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Entertainment Homophobic law in Hungary: Gulacsi sets standards

18:45  23 february  2021
18:45  23 february  2021 Source:   sport1.de

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Goalkeeper Peter Gulacsi from Bundesliga club RB Leipzig has clearly positioned himself against homophobia in his home country Hungary.

Homophobes Gesetz in Ungarn: Gulacsi setzt Zeichen © Provided by sport1.de Homophobic law in Hungary: Gulacsi sets standards

Goalkeeper Peter Gulacsi from Bundesliga club RB Leipzig has clearly positioned himself against homophobia in his home country Hungary.

The 30-year-old criticized the law passed at the end of December in a Facebook post on Tuesday, according to which homosexual couples are not allowed to adopt children.

"Everyone has the right to equal rights," wrote the goalkeeper: "Every child has the right to grow up in a happy family - regardless of how many people it consists of, what skin color you have, whom you love or to what you believe. "

Prime Minister Viktor Orban's government has been causing a stir for years with its anti-LGBTQ policies.

Gulacsi emphasized that during his time abroad he had "met many different people with different nationalities, different religions or cultures and philosophies of life".

Through these many meetings he noticed "that the fact that not everyone is the same only makes the world more colorful and that the most important thing is love, acceptance and tolerance for others." Gulacsi has not played in his home country since 2007 and has been for RB since 2015.

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usr: 16
This is interesting!