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Entertainment Today in Music History - Sept. 13

11:51  13 september  2021
11:51  13 september  2021 Source:   msn.com

Japan’s Fujipacific Chairman Ichiro Asatsuma Talks 55-Year Career, Future of J-Pop & More

  Japan’s Fujipacific Chairman Ichiro Asatsuma Talks 55-Year Career, Future of J-Pop & More Billboard Japan celebrated the industry veteran’s recognition on Billboard’s 2021 International Power Players list with an in-depth interview delving into his illustrious career spanning five decades.Asatsuma was chairman of Japan’s Music Publishers Association from 2004 to 2010 and has been chairman of Fujipacific Music since 2005. Billboard Japan celebrated the industry veteran’s recognition on the honored list with an in-depth interview delving into his illustrious career spanning five decades, asking him for his thoughts on the differences between the way business is done in Japan and the U.S. and what he expects from the music scene in the future.

September 13 th in Music History looks like this. 1963, Graham Nash fell out of The Hollies van after a gig in Scotland. Nash checked to see if the door was locked, it wasn’t and he fell out as it travelled at 40 m.p.h. 1964, During a UK tour two dozen rugby players were hired as ‘a human crash barrier’ at a At the age of 92 it made her the oldest living artist to achieve this feat with an album. Birthdays today include Ray Elliott of Them bit handy on Sax, Flute and Keys. Peter Cetera, Chicago and Zak Starkey – son of Ringo! Don’t forget you can now get This Week in Music History every Friday from Nova.ie

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Today in Music History for Sept. 13:

In 1925, singer-songwriter Mel Torme, nicknamed "The Velvet Fog," was born in Chicago. He was known as one of the great male jazz singers of his generation. He also composed the music for "The Christmas Song." He died on June 5, 1999.

In 1941, Canadian rock singer David Clayton-Thomas was born in Surrey, England. He began playing guitar in his late teens during time spent in Ontario prisons. As Sonny Thomas, he formed "The Fabulous Shays," who had two Canadian hits in 1965, "Walk That Walk" and "Out of the Sunshine." He then formed "The Bossmen," one of the first rock bands to include jazz elements in their music. They had a hit in 1966 with "Brainwashed." Thomas went to the U.S. in 1966, and from 1968-72 was the lead singer for "Blood, Sweat and Tears." He sang on many of their hits, such as "Spinning Wheel," "And When I Die" and "You Make Me So Very Happy." He rejoined "Blood, Sweat and Tears" in 1974 and was with them until 1976. In 1978, he reformed the band in Toronto with local musicians. In 1996, he was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame.

Executive Turntable: UMe Names Business Affairs Head; FADER Label Grows Team

  Executive Turntable: UMe Names Business Affairs Head; FADER Label Grows Team A rundown of executive hires, promotions and exits in the week ending September 3, 2021.Hilderley’s hire marks a homecoming for the executive, who previously worked under the UMG umbrella for over 20 years, most recently as executive vp and head of business and legal affairs at Interscope Geffen A&M Records. She joins UMe from King, Holmes, Paterno & Soriano, LLP, where she represented artists, producers, songwriters, record labels, music executives and entrepreneurs. Her career began at Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp, LLP following her graduation from Harvard Law School.

Today in Music History for Sept . 10: In 1819, Canadian hymnwriter Joseph Scriven was born. In 1988, a dozen gang members held a man to the ground as he was stabbed to death during a rap concert at the Nassau Coliseum in Mineola, N.Y. At least 13 people were either knifed or beaten during the show by Eric B. and Rakim, Kool Moe Dee and Doug E. Fresh. In 1991, Garth Brooks released his album "Ropin' the Wind."

Today in Music History for Sept . 12: In 1931, country music legend George Jones, the peerless, hard-living country singer who recorded dozens of hits about good times and regrets and peaked with the heartbreaking classic "He Stopped Loving Her Today ," was born in Saratoga, Texas. In a career that lasted more than 50 years, "Possum" recorded more than 150 albums and became the champion and

In 1959, Elvis Presley first met his future wife, 14-year-old Priscilla Beaulieu, while stationed in West Germany with the U.S. Army. They married in 1967, but divorced in 1973.

In 1960, the U.S. House of Representatives officially made the practice of payola illegal -- in which record companies paid disc jockeys to play certain records. The congressional investigation into payola caused the downfall of pioneer disc jockey Alan Freed, who did more than any other deejay to bring rock 'n' roll to a mass audience. Freed was fined $300 and given a suspended sentence in 1962 after pleading guilty to two counts of commercial bribery. He was blackballed by the radio industry, and died a broken man on Jan. 20, 1965, at age 42.

In 1965, a son, Zak, was born to "Beatles'" drummer Ringo Starr and his wife, Maureen.

College football Week 2 overreactions: Oregon a lock for the playoff, Michigan is a Big Ten contender

  College football Week 2 overreactions: Oregon a lock for the playoff, Michigan is a Big Ten contender It was another eventful college football weekend. It's important to not put too much stock into the results. Here are five overreactions from Week 2.That's a dangerous proposition when there are 11 more weeks and the unpredictable nature of the sport has already been on full display this season. Almost half of the preseason Top 25 in the USA TODAY Sports AFCA Coaches Poll has already lost a game. There are more to come.

Today in Music History for Sept . 12: Load Error In 1931, country music legend George Jones, the peerless, hard-living country singer who recorded dozens of hits about good times and regrets and peaked with the heartbreaking classic "He Stopped Loving Her Today ," was born in Saratoga, Texas. In a career that lasted more than 50 years, "Possum" recorded more than 150 albums and b

13 Sept . 2021 12:01 am EST by Judy Byington, MSW, LCSW, Therapist ret, Journalist, Author, “Twenty Two Faces: inside the extraordinary life of Jenny Hill and her twenty two multiple personalities.” Trust the Plan: The Storm of the Century Has Arrived. “Children of the same vile spirit” – George W. Bush compares “domestic extremists” on January 6 with Islamic terrorists in a speech on September 11. Trump in an interview: “I am actually sure that the results of the 2020 elections will be canceled (…)

In 1969, John Lennon, Yoko Ono and "The Plastic Ono Band" played their first gig at the "Toronto Rock 'N' Roll Revival." It was Lennon's first concert performance in three years, and the appearance was documented in the album "Live Peace in Toronto, 1969."  "The Plastic Ono Band" consisted of Lennon and Eric Clapton on guitars, Klaus Voorman on bass and Alan White of "Yes" on drums. Also on the bill at the "Toronto Rock 'n' Roll Revival" were Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Bo Diddley and Gene Vincent.

In 1974, Stevie Wonder played the Nassau Coliseum on Long Island, N.Y., his first concert appearance since a near-fatal auto accident a year earlier.

In 1975, "The Guess Who," fronted by Burton Cummings, performed together for the last time, at the Montreal Forum. Several reconstituted versions, including the original lineup, of "The Guess Who" have played in concert since then.

In 1977, conductor Leopold Stokowski died in England at age 95. He was conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra for 24 years, ending in 1936, and in 1940 served as musical supervisor for Walt Disney's classic film "Fantasia." Stokowski also had much to do with improving the techniques for recording classical music.

Opinion: Peyton and Eli Manning make Monday's game a blast with alternate simulcast

  Opinion: Peyton and Eli Manning make Monday's game a blast with alternate simulcast Manning brothers Peyton and Eli brought their special blend of sarcasm and self-deprecation to the alternate simulcast of "MNF."If you didn't check your local listings for the NFL's Week 1 capper between the Ravens and Raiders in Las Vegas – tuning in to ESPN by rote – then you missed the alternate simulcast on ESPN2, "Monday Night Football with Peyton and Eli.

On the June 13 edition of Music History Today podcast, a couple of trials end, a couple of legends pass away, and Paula Abdul debuts. Plus, members of the groups Smash Mouth, Weezer, and Heart celebrate birthdays.

Today in Music History for Sept . 24: In 1941, Linda McCartney was born in Scarsdale, N.Y. She married Paul McCartney in 1969, soon after he broke up with Jane Asher. Linda's maiden name was Eastman and she was a photographer, but she was not, as reported at the time of her marriage, the heiress to the Eastman photographic fortune. Linda was heavily involved in Paul's 1971 album "Ram," and

In 1979, Swedish pop group "ABBA" began their first North American tour, in Edmonton. Their personal appearances were infrequent, partly because of the difficulty of reproducing their multi-tracked recordings on stage.

In 1985, rock vocalist Sting of "The Police" began a solo tour in San Diego to promote his album "Dream of the Blue Turtles."


Video: Today in History for September 10th (The Canadian Press)

In 1986, CKND-TV in Winnipeg broadcast the Canadian Country Music Awards nationally for the first time.

In 1996, rapper Tupac Shakur died in a Las Vegas hospital, six days after he was wounded in a drive-by shooting on the city's casino strip. He was 25. Shakur was hit by four bullets as he rode in a car driven by the head of Death Row Records, Marion (Suge) Knight, who suffered a minor wound. No one was ever charged. Shakur was one of rap music's most notorious and successful artists, selling millions of copies of such albums as "All Eyez on Me" and "If I Die 2Nite." He also had numerous troubles with the law, serving time for assault, weapons violations and sex abuse. Two months after Shakur's death, a witness to the Las Vegas shooting was gunned down in a housing project in Orange, N.J. Yafeu Fula was a member of Shakur's backup group, "The Outlaws Immortalz." He was in the car behind Shakur when the rapper was shot.

Opinion: Las Vegas fans hit jackpot in Raiders' season opener with boisterous performance

  Opinion: Las Vegas fans hit jackpot in Raiders' season opener with boisterous performance Raiders fans in Las Vegas passed their first test: in an OT victory against the Ravens, they performed, helping the team "pull out that win."Is Las Vegas truly worthy of an NFL team? 

In 1997, the Francis Winspear Centre, a $40 million concert hall, opened in Edmonton. The 10-day opening festival included concerts by jazz greats Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter, Irish folk legends "The Chieftains" and a joint performance by the Edmonton and Calgary symphonies.

In 1998, Melanie Brown, also known as "Scary Spice" of the "Spice Girls," married dancer Jimmy Gulzar in England. The couple had a child the following March. They divorced in 2000.

In 2009, Johnny Reid won five trophies at the Canadian Country Music Association awards, including Album of the Year for "Dance With Me." Reid also won for Video of the Year, Male Artist of the Year, the Fans' Choice Award and Songwriter of the Year for "A Woman Like You." "Doc Walker" won the Group Award, Crystal Shawanda took the Female Artist of the Year and Dean Brody was given Single of the Year for "Brothers." Tara Oram won the Rising Star Award.

In 2009, the MTV Video Awards began on a more sombre note with Madonna introducing a poignant, tender tribute to the late Michael Jackson. During the show, rapper Kanye West had yet another awards show meltdown. Taylor Swift, who became the first country artist to win an MTV award, was on stage accepting her award for Best Female Video for "You Belong to Me," when West jumped on stage and took the microphone from Swift and protested her win, saying Beyonce should have won instead for "Single Ladies (Put a Ring On It)."  When Beyonce later won Video of the Year for that song, she brought Swift back on stage to have her finish her acceptance speech. Among the highlight performances of the night was P!nk's trapeze act while singing "Sober."

Clemson football fans beg Clemson fans to stop a certain Tigers cheer

  Clemson football fans beg Clemson fans to stop a certain Tigers cheer Some younger Clemson fans hold up a paw hand gesture, and other Clemson fans hate it. It's likened to what some consider the lamentable "woo-hoo."What was supposed to resemble the famous tiger paw was seen as an "arthritic hand gesture" to at least one observer on Twitter.

In 2010, rap icons Eminem and Jay-Z performed at the new Yankee Stadium, the first musical concert since it opened in 2009. Beyonce, Kanye West, Dr. Dre, Drake, 50 Cent, and Chris Martin of "Coldplay" were among the musical guests.

In 2011, former "Beatle" Paul McCartney was named MusiCares Person of the Year, citing not only his music but his charitable side also. The annual event celebrates a legend in the days leading up to the Grammy Awards with an array of music stars paying tribute by singing their songs, and the honoree sometimes performs as well.

In 2011, Wilma Lee Cooper, who teamed with her husband Stoney Cooper, to become a top country duo for three decades, died of natural causes at her home in Sweetwater, Tenn. She was 90. She earned the title "The First Lady of Bluegrass." She and her husband began recording in the late 1940s, then performed regularly on the Grand Ole Opry from 1957 until his death in 1977. She continued as a solo singer on the show until 2001 when she had a stroke.

In 2011, Grammy winner and Rock and Roll Hall-of-Famer Bob Seger ended his time as an iTunes holdout when downloads of the concert albums "'Live' Bullet" and "Nine Tonight" appeared on iTunes and Amazon.com. He said his remaining catalogue would "come out in dribs and drabs."

In 2015, Gord Bamford repeated as Male Artist of the Year and for Single of the Year at the Canadian Country Music Awards in Halifax. He also won Songwriter of the Year. For his first CCMA ever, former Default rocker-turned country singer Dallas Smith won the coveted Album of the Year award for "Lifted." Jess Moskaluke won Female Artist of the Year for the second year in a row, while Johnny Reid claimed the Fans' Choice Award for the sixth time in the past seven years.

In 2015, Gary Richrath, a former guitarist for the classic rock band REO Speedwagon who also co-wrote the group's hit song "Take It on the Run," died at age 65. He was a member of the band when it released its self-titled debut in 1971 until 1989.

In 2019, rock star Eddie Money died in Los Angeles, just a few weeks after he announced he had stage 4 esophageal cancer. He was 70. The husky-voiced, blue collar performer was known for such hits as "Two Tickets to Paradise" and "Take Me Home Tonight." Born Edward Joseph Mahoney, Money grew up in a family of police officers and was training in law enforcement himself before he rebelled and decided he'd rather be a singer.

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(The Canadian Press)

The Canadian Press

Purdue WR David Bell carted off field vs. Notre Dame, 'up, walking' after game .
Purdue receiver David Bell was "up, walking" after he was taken off the field in the fourth quarter against Notre Dame after a hit from Kyle Hamilton.Bell made a 9-yard catch from Aiden O'Connell but bounced hard off the turf and stayed down.

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