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Entertainment Today in Music History - Nov. 28

12:11  28 november  2021
12:11  28 november  2021 Source:   msn.com

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Today in Music History for Nov. 28:

In 1902, the Quebec Symphony Orchestra gave its first concert at Tara Hall with violinist J. Alexandre Gilbert as soloist. The Quebec Symphony is Canada's oldest surviving major orchestra.

In 1918, pioneer Canadian composer Alexis Contant died in Montreal at the age of 60. His major work was "Cain," one of the first oratorios composed by a Canadian and premiered in 1905.

In 1925, the first "WSM Barn Dance" was broadcast over the Nashville radio station. The program was the brainchild of program director George D. Hay, who had run a similar program on a Chicago radio station. Hay also was responsible for renaming the program the Grand Ole Opry in 1927. The Grand Ole Opry has remained a Saturday night tradition on WSM to this day, and is country music's most famous institution.

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In 1929, Berry Gordy Jr., the founder of Motown Records, was born in Detroit. He first gained fame as a songwriter, penning the million-sellers "Reet Petite" and "Lonely Teardrops" for Jackie Wilson and "You Got What It Takes" for Marv Johnson. In 1959, he borrowed $700 from his sister, Anna, to start Motown Records. The company became the major R&B and soul music outfit of the 1960s and '70s, launching such acts as "Smokey Robinson and the Miracles," "The Temptations," Stevie Wonder, "Diana Ross and the Supremes" and "The Commodores." Gordy designed the Motown sound to appeal to both black and white audiences, and more than 120 of the company's records made the Billboard top-20 in the 1960s. Gordy moved his company's operations from Detroit to Los Angeles in 1971. By the end of the decade, Motown had become the largest black-owned conglomerate in the U.S. On June 28, 1988, it was sold to MCA Records and an investment firm for US$61 million.

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In 1940, 1960s rocker Bruce Channel was born in Jacksonville, Texas. After his "Hey Baby" went to the top of the U.S. charts in 1962, Channel toured Britain with "The Beatles."

In 1942, almost 500 people died in a flash fire at Boston's Cocoanut Grove nightclub. Nightclub singer Bill Payne saved 10 patrons by leading them into a huge icebox in the building's basement.

In 1943, singer-songwriter Randy Newman was born in New Orleans. He had a surprise hit in 1978 with the controversial "Short People," which mocked bigotry. The sharply satirical tone of most of Newman's lyrics tends to limit his appeal. But many other artists have done well with his songs, particularly "Three Dog Night," who took "Mama Told Me Not to Come" to the top of the charts in 1970. Newman later turned to stage and movie work, amassing 16 Academy Award nominations until finally collecting his first Oscar in 2002 for Best Original Song for "If I Didn't Have You" from the animated film, "Monsters, Inc."

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In 1961, Halifax-born baritone James Milligan died suddenly in Basel, Switzerland, at the age of 33. His death came only months after a much-praised debut at the Wagner Festival in Bayreuth as the Wotan-Wanderer in "Siegfried." Milligan, a Halifax native, also made several recordings with the famed conductor, Sir Malcolm Sargent.

In 1964, "Leader of the Pack" by "The Shangri-Las" reached No. 1 on the Billboard pop chart. It was the group's biggest hit, and inspired a parody, "Leader of the Laundromat" by "The Detergents."

In 1964, Willie Nelson made his debut on the Grand Ole Opry.

In 1966, "The Beatles" began recording sessions for "Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band." The album took four months and cost $75,000 to record. It was released the following June.

In 1973, Canadian mezzo-soprano Huguette Tourangeau made her Metropolitan Opera debut as Nicklausse in "The Tales of Hoffman."

In 1974, John Lennon made his last public appearance at a Madison Square Garden concert by Elton John. They performed three songs together -- "Whatever Gets You Through the Night," "I Saw Her Standing There" and "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds." All three were on an LP released after Lennon's death in December 1980. As well, "I Saw Her Standing There" appeared on the flip-side of John's 1975 chart-topper, "Philadelphia Freedom."

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In 1976, Canadian composer Robert Fleming died in Ottawa at the age of 55. A native of Prince Albert, Sask., Fleming composed more than 250 film scores, mainly for the National Film Board. He also wrote a song cycle, "The Confession Stone," for Canadian contralto Maureen Forrester in 1966, and a ballet, "Shadow on the Prairie," for the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in 1952.

In 1988, Toronto blues-rock guitarist Jeff Healey created a sensation when he made his British debut at the Borderline Club in London. Healey was known for his distinctive method of playing the guitar on his lap. The critic for the "Daily Telegraph" raved that reports of Healey's explosive talent were not exaggerated. Healey was in Britain to promote his first album, "See the Light." Healey died of cancer on March 2, 2008.

In 1990, officials in Los Angeles decided there wasn't enough evidence to prosecute singer Axl Rose for assault in connection with a dispute with his neighbour. The neighbour claimed Rose hit her over the head with an empty wine bottle.

In 1991, "Guns N' Roses" announced rhythm guitarist Izzy Stradlin had left the band, the second departure from the group within a year. Drummer Steve Adler was fired earlier over a heroin problem and later sued "Guns N' Roses." Stradlin's replacement was Gilby Clarke of "Kill for Thrills."

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In 1996, 2,854 children played a 15-minute piece called "Let Music Live," conducted by Sir Simon Rattle, setting a record as the world's largest orchestra.

In 2001, Aretha Franklin sued the tabloid "Star" magazine for defamation. Franklin demanded $50 million, accusing the magazine of making up a report that she's a heavy drinker.

In 2001, lyricist Kal Mann died in Philadelphia at age 84. He combined with composer Dave Appell to write such 1950s and '60s dance hits as "Let's Twist Again," "South Street," "Bristol Stomp," "Wild One" and "Wah-Watusi." Mann also co-wrote Elvis Presley's "(Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear."

In 2008, country music rising star Crystal Shawanda was the big winner at the 10th annual Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards, taking home five trophies. Shawanda -- an Ojibwa from the Wikwemikong reserve on Manitoulin Island, Ont. -- swept every category she was nominated in, picking up Best Female Artist, Best Single and Best Video ("You Can Let Go") and Best Country Album and Album of the Year for "Dawn of a New Day."

In 2009, Del-Fi Records founder Bob Keane, who discovered rocker Ritchie Valens, died of renal failure in Los Angeles at age 87. In 1958, he discovered the 17-year-old Valens at a small concert and invited him to record in his home studio. Their brief association led to Valens' hits "Come On, Let's Go," "Donna" and "La Bamba."

In 2010, several delays and at least two actors who were left helplessly dangling from cables high in the air marred the first preview of the $75-million Broadway mega-musical "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark." The show, the brainchild of Tony Award-winning director Julie Taymor with music by Bono and The Edge of "U2," took more than eight years to make. (It debuted on June 14, 2011, after a record 183 previews and closed its Broadway run on Jan. 4, 2014, after 1,268 performances and grossing more than $200 million. It went on to take up residence in Las Vegas.)

In 2012, Barbadian superstar Rihanna finally achieved her first No. 1 album when "Unapologetic" debuted atop the Billboard 200 Album chart. She had the unfortunate distinction of having the most No. 1 singles (12) on the Hot 100 without having a No. 1 album.

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(The Canadian Press)

The Canadian Press

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