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Entertainment The Judges from Hot Bench Share Their Best Advice for Coming to Court

23:40  06 april  2022
23:40  06 april  2022 Source:   people.com

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When it comes to the American justice system, the three judges on Hot Bench — a court television show created and produced by Judge Judy Sheindlin — have been handing out verdicts long before their reality TV debuts.

On the program, Judge Tanya Acker, Judge Patricia DiMango and Judge Michael Corriero preside over small claims cases before rendering a verdict.

Below they share their best advice for those who wind up in court.

Judge Tanya Acker

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"Think like the other side.  Look at your best piece of evidence and criticize it the way the person who you're suing or who is suing you would do. Be prepared for what they are going to throw at you. Be extra hard on your own case before the judge has the time to do it," Acker tells PEOPLE.

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Acker received her B.A. degree at Howard University in 1992 and attended Yale Law School, where she represented low-income women in family law cases and served as a teaching assistant in Constitutional Law and Civil Procedure courses.

Acker is an experienced civil litigator who has represented a wide array of clients, from major automobile manufacturers in high-stakes product liability litigation to media companies in hotly contested trade secret disputes.

In 2020, she wrote a book, titled Make Your Case: Finding Your Win in Civil Court, which provides curated and targeted information about what people should know including what happens during court proceedings and why, how to best prepare for it, how to avoid court entirely and find out if there is a better way.

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Judge Patricia DiMango

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"Know the facts of your case.  Be truthful about what happened.  Bring whatever physical evidence you have that corroborates your story.  But most of all, be truthful, candid and forthright," she tells PEOPLE.

Upon her graduation from college, Justice DiMango was an elementary school teacher in the New York City Public Schools, focusing on special education of children with emotional and cognitive needs.

During her teaching years, and before law school, she received her master's degree. She went on to receive her law degree from St. John's University. Then, during the course of her judicial career, she gained public recognition for handling high-profile trials, particularly those involving murders of young children, other crimes against children and hate crime murders.

Justice DiMango was the first to be appointed as a Judge of the Criminal Courts for the City of New York by then-Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. She also became the first Italian American woman ever appointed to that position. She was then elected to the New York State Supreme Court bench in the 2nd and 11th Judicial Districts, and again was the first Italian American woman elected to that position.

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Judge Michael Corriero

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"When you come to court, be prepared to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.  Always take the moral high ground in a dispute," he tells PEOPLE.

Judge Corriero graduated from St. John's University School of Law and St. John's University. He served as a prosecutor in the office of Manhattan District Attorney Frank Hogan, a criminal defense attorney and a judge for 28 years in the criminal courts of New York State.

For 16 years, he presided over Manhattan's Youth Part, a special court he created in the Supreme Court of New York State which is designed to focus attention and scarce resources on young offenders prosecuted as adults pursuant to New York State's Juvenile Offender Law. Under his leadership, the Youth Part became a model for mobilization and coordination of treatment and social services for children prosecuted in adult courts.

He retired from the bench in 2008 to become the Executive Director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City. Two years later, he left the organization to establish the New York Center for Juvenile Justice, which promotes a comprehensive model of justice for minors that treats children as children and responds to their misconduct with strategies designed to improve their chances of becoming constructive members of society.

Read the original article on People

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