Money: Millions of piracy notices coming to Canadians can no longer demand cash - PressFrom - Canada
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MoneyMillions of piracy notices coming to Canadians can no longer demand cash

12:50  27 january  2019
12:50  27 january  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

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As a result of this “ notice and notice scheme,” millions of Internet subscribers have received warnings in their mailboxes, with some asking for cash That’s good news for members of the public who are no longer at risk. Canada Prohibits Piracy Settlement Demands in ISP Copyright Notices .

Piracy notices demanding settlement fees have left some Canadians fearful or confused. Critics say it's time for Ottawa to take a serious look at its piracy notice system and decide what those letters can say to Canadians . Since notice -and- notice came into effect the university — which is also an internet provider — has Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted. By submitting a comment, you

Millions of piracy notices coming to Canadians can no longer demand cash© CBC CBC Close to four years after its piracy-notice system took effect, the federal government has amended the rules to clarify that the notices can't demand cash from Canadians.

Implemented in 2015, Canada's notice system enables copyright holders to send warning emails to people suspected of illegally downloading content such as movies or music.

Since its inception, critics have loudly complained that some notices crossed a line by threatening legal action if the recipient didn't pay a settlement fee — often hundreds of dollars.

Recipients of such notices also loudly complained, including 89-year-old grandmother Christine McMillan in Toronto. In 2016, she received a notice demanding money for something she says she never did — illegally download a shoot 'em up video game.

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Meanwhile, Canada 's notice system continues and so does a controversial type of notice telling recipients they need to pay a settlement fee. Canadians are still getting notices when they're suspected of internet piracy and some of them include demands for cash .

Canadian ISPs are calling on the Government to prevent copyright holders from using the country's notice -and- notice scheme to forward piracy settlement demands . Following a long series of debates, Canada modernized its Copyright Act several years ago.

"I was really angry," she said. "This is a scam that's being perpetrated by the government."

The government has now clarified the rules with new amendments to Canada's Copyright Act. They state that piracy notices can't ask for personal information or a payment including a settlement fee.

"Our amendments to the regime will protect consumers," Hans Parmar, spokesperson for Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, said in an email.

However, some internet service providers (ISPs) claim the amendments don't go far enough.

Millions of piracy notices coming to Canadians can no longer demand cash© Canadian Government Andy Kaplan-Myrth with TekSavvy voiced his concerns about notices requesting settlement fees before a government committee in September. Rights holders don't know their suspect's actual identity, only the IP address linked to the illegal download. While ISPs won't disclose the identity of a customer behind the IP address, they're obligated by law to forward that customer any piracy notices.

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The mandatory piracy notifications that were implemented to deter copyright infringement in Canada By using VPN services or BitTorrent proxies their sharing activities can no longer be linked to their The abuse of these notices in particular. Another consequence of the new law is that Canadian VPN

They demanded a ransom, believed to be ,000 (£61,700) – peanuts for a franchise that has pulled in bn Big releases are destined for piracy as soon as they hit the multiplexes anyway, so how much The days of installing a torrent software and dealing with peers / seeds is coming to an end.

To cope with the flood of notices they must pass on, ISPs largely rely on automated systems, which means ones demanding cash could still slip through.

"The immediate onus is on ISPs to either search for or find some way to filter for these settlement demands, which is, I think, not really possible," said Andy Kaplan-Myrth, vice-president of regulatory and carrier affairs for internet provider TekSavvy.

Some have paid up

Canada's notice system was created to discourage piracy, not collect cash. But that didn't stop some content creators from sending notices demanding money plus a link to a website where people could pay by credit card.

A compliant recipient not only paid a fine they weren't obligated to pay, but also exposed their identity.

"It's just not good for customers to be getting misleading information and misleading links and we don't want any part of it," said Kaplan-Myrth.

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Canada 's new piracy warning notice scheme is young but already controversial. A change in the law means that when copyright holders spot Canadian subscribers’ Internet connections sharing content online without permission, ISPs must forward any resulting infringement notices to their customers.

Suspected Canadian pirates continue to get email notices telling them to pay a settlement fee. At least one anti- piracy company is still sending copyright infringement notices on behalf of Hollywood studios, demanding Canadians pay a settlement Yet the emails demanding cash keep coming .

Millions of piracy notices coming to Canadians can no longer demand cash© CBC CBC

In McMillan's case, she was told if she didn't pay a fee, she could face legal fines of up to $5,000. She chose to ignore her notice.

But others have complied, including a 60-year-old woman who claimed she was falsely accused of illegally downloading porn and, out of fear, paid a settlement fee of $257.40.

Her notice, along with McMillan's, were sent by Canadian anti-piracy company Canipre on behalf of rights holders.

Canipre says it didn't break any rules by asking for fees and that its goal was simply to educate abusers and deter them from reoffending.

"When you have to pay something out of your pocket, it hurts," said Barry Logan, Canipre's managing director. "It's a deterrent."

Logan said his company wasn't out to make money or collect personal data from alleged pirates.

"There was a myth out there, that, 'Don't contact them, they track you.' No. Come on. This isn't the KGB."

Logan declined to say how much money Canipre has collected in fees and said the company stopped sending these types of notices in early 2018, due to concerns expressed by the government.

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While notices are one of the more reasonable anti- piracy options available today, there are companies that want to augment those gentle warnings into Close to day one of the new law, U.S.-based anti- piracy outfit Rightscorp began sending infringement notices to Canadians with cash -settlement

Following the introduction of Canada 's notice and notice system earlier this year, hundreds of thousands of ISP subscribers have received piracy warnings Due to a recent change i Canada ’s copyright law, ISPs are now required to forward copyright infringement notices to their customers.

He said he's not disappointed by the new amendments because Canipre's notices requesting fees achieved its goal by educating people about the repercussions of piracy.

"We got through to a few people. I know we did."

'Millions of notices'

Canipre said it has stopped sending requests for cash, but some major ISPs fear the new amendments may not be enough to stop a company that defies the rules.

In a recent submission to the government's standing committee on industry, science and technology, a group involving six major ISPs including Bell, Rogers and Telus, asked for additional amendments to toughen up the government's rules.

The group, which calls itself Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright (BCBC), said internet providers now must weed out settlement fee notices — an imperfect plan considering they deal with "millions of notices per month."

BCBC recommends the government also mandate a standardized piracy notice that senders must adhere to, which would help eliminate the risk of non-compliant notices slipping through.

Millions of piracy notices coming to Canadians can no longer demand cash© CBC CBC

TekSavvy isn't a member of BCBC, but agrees with the plan.

"The change that should have come sort of hand in hand with this new addition is some kind of standard form," said Kaplan-Myrth.

Even Canipre's Logan said he's fine with a standardized notice format — as long as it can still contain information about the legal ramifications for illegally downloading content.

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While notices are one of the more reasonable anti- piracy options available today, there are companies that want to augment those gentle warnings into Close to day one of the new law, U.S.-based anti- piracy outfit Rightscorpbegan sending infringement notices to Canadians with cash -settlement

According to the University of Manitoba’s copyright office, among a flood of 8,000 piracy notices are some warning students that they could lose their scholarships or even be deported if Copyright trolls are known for their dubious tactics but a new report from Canada shows just how low they can sink.

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada said that the concerns raised by ISPs will be explored during the government's current review of the Copyright Act.

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