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MoneyBoeing defends Dreamliner plant against claim of shoddy production

12:40  23 april  2019
12:40  23 april  2019 Source:   nbcnews.com

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A new Boeing 787 -10 Dreamliner taxis past the Final Assembly Building at Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston, South Carolina, in March Boeing Co. sharply denied published allegations that " shoddy production " and oversight at its North Charleston, South Carolina, factory threatens the

Boeing ’s factory in North Charleston, South Carolina, one of two plants that produces the 787 Dreamliner , has faced problems with production and oversight that create a safety threat, a report said. Boeing management defends its South Carolina team.

Boeing defends Dreamliner plant against claim of shoddy production© Randall Hill Image: FILE PHOTO: The new Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner taxis past the Final Assembly Building at Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston

Boeing Co. sharply denied published allegations that "shoddy production" and oversight at its North Charleston, South Carolina, factory threatens the safety of the company's long-haul 787.

The report, published Saturday by The New York Times, comes as Boeing is the subject of multiple investigations into the certification process for a different aircraft, the 737 Max series, after 346 people were killed in crashes of a Lion Air flight in October and an Ethiopian Airlines flight last month.

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Boeing Co. sharply denied published allegations Sunday that " shoddy production " and oversight at its North Charleston, South Carolina, factory threatens the safety of the company's long-haul 787 Dreamliner , NBC News reports. The allegations, published Saturday by The New York Times, come

And now, a second Boeing aircraft — the 787 Dreamliner — is coming under scrutiny, with whistleblowers who worked at a North Charleston, South Carolina, factory that produces the jet claiming the company is compromising safety with its “ shoddy production ” and “weak oversight.”

In a communiqué to employees, Brad Zaback, site leader of the South Carolina facility and general manager of Boeing's 787 program, said The Times distorted information and rehashed old stories "that have long ago been put to rest."

The Times reported Saturday that Boeing ignored and in some cases sought retribution against employees who complained that the plant turned a blind eye to problems created by what the newspaper characterized as the company's rush to produce the planes as quickly as possible.

Citing internal emails, corporate and federal documents and interviews with current and former employees, The Times reported that the plant valued production speed over quality, leading to problems like manufacturing defects and potentially dangerous debris left in completed planes.

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Boeing Co.’s factory in North Charleston, S.C., one of two plants that produces the 787 Dreamliner , has faced problems with production and oversight that create a safety threat, the A technician at the plant , Joseph Clayton, said he routinely found debris dangerously close to wiring beneath cockpits.

And now, a second Boeing aircraft — the 787 Dreamliner — is coming under scrutiny, with whistleblowers who worked at a North Charleston, South Carolina, factory that produces the jet claiming the company is compromising safety with its “ shoddy production ” and “weak oversight.”

Boeing produces the Dreamliner in North Charleston and in Everett, Washington, north of Seattle. The report examined only the South Carolina facility, and The Times acknowledged that "there is no evidence that the problems in South Carolina have led to any major safety incidents."

Zaback, who called the Times report "offensive," responded by telling employees that the planes undergo "rigorous quality inspections" and "perform exceptionally well in service for our valued airplane customers around the world."

"It's unfortunate and disappointing that the New York Times chose to publish this misleading story," he said, saying the company invited The Times to "visit Boeing South Carolina once they contacted us, so that they could see first-hand the great work that is done here."

"They declined this invitation," Zaback wrote.

Danielle Rhoades Ha, The Times' vice president for communications, said Sunday night that Boeing made its offer of a tour on Friday and that the newspaper declined to delay Saturday's scheduled publication. She said the company declined to make executives at the plant available for on-the-record interviews.

CORRECTION (April 21, 2019, 9 p.m. ET): A previous version of this article misstated when an Ethiopian Airlines plane and a Lion Air plane crashed. The Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed in March; the Lion Air flight crashed in October.

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