•   
  •   
  •   

MoneyIndustry, Kenney pleased with energy-friendly proposed revamp of Bill C-69

07:25  17 may  2019
07:25  17 may  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

OPINION | Why Kenney's honeymoon popularity may last less than 9 months

OPINION | Why Kenney's honeymoon popularity may last less than 9 months Jason Kenney should savour these days, political analysts say, as the "glow that comes with winning" almost invariably gets tarnished by the weight of governing.

Alberta's energy industry is pleased with the latest changes to a controversial piece of legislation that many initially feared would cripple Canada's natural resource sector. On Thursday, the Senate energy committee approved nearly 200 amendments to Bill C - 69 , which is supposed to improve the

The political debate around Bill C - 69 , which aims to overhaul the environmental assessment process for major resource projects, has been centred on "what it would do to pipelines," Rabson told The Current's Anna Industry , Kenney pleased with energy - friendly proposed revamp of Bill C - 69 .

Industry, Kenney pleased with energy-friendly proposed revamp of Bill C-69© CBC Alberta Independent Sen. Doug Black says the senate committee took a 'horrible piece of legislation' and turned it into something that could be a win-win for industry, the environment and First Nations.

Alberta's energy industry is pleased with the latest changes to a controversial piece of legislation that many initially feared would cripple Canada's natural resource sector.

On Thursday, the Senate energy committee approved nearly 200 amendments to Bill C-69, which is supposed to improve the way the environmental impacts of major energy and transportation projects are evaluated, making the assessments more stringent so that they are less likely to fail court challenges.

OPINION | The sudden diplomacy of Premier Jason Kenney

OPINION | The sudden diplomacy of Premier Jason Kenney When newly-minter Alberta Premier Jason Kenney met with Prime Minister Trudeau in Ottawa Thursday it was the political equivalent of matter and antimatter colliding. Kenney has a shopping list of disputes with Trudeau that include the federal carbon tax, Bill C-48, Bill C-69, and equalization. To make the meeting even more awkward, Kenney has made no secret of his complete disdain for Trudeau both professionally and personally, once publicly insulting Trudeau as "an empty trust-fund millionaire who has the political depth of a finger bowl.

Bill C - 69 is supposed to improve the way the environmental impact of major energy and But the oil industry , backed by Alberta Premier Jason Kenney , has launched ferocious opposition to the bill Conservative senators, who proposed 90 amendments, hailed the committee's acceptance of them

Bill C - 69 is supposed to improve the way the environmental impact of major energy and Kenney pronounced himself pleased with the changes but said he wants to see what happens with the final Conservative senators, who proposed 90 amendments, hailed the committee’s acceptance of them

The amendments approved by the Senate's energy, environment and natural resources committee would reduce cabinet discretion to intervene in the assessment process, make it harder for anyone to initiate court challenges to decisions on projects and change how climate change impacts are considered. Some of the amendments are word-for-word what was proposed by energy lobby groups.

"The package that the Senate has put together, I think, has positioned this bill as good as is possible," said Tim McMillan, CEO of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers. "They are the best possible structure that this bill could be in at this point."

Industry, Kenney pleased with energy-friendly proposed revamp of Bill C-69© Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press Pro-pipeline supporters rally outside a public hearing of the Senate committee on energy, the environment and natural resources regarding Bill C-69 in Calgary in early April.

On Thursday, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, who has dubbed the bill the "No More Pipelines Act," pronounced himself pleased with the changes, but he said he wants to see what happens with the final law.

In major reversal, Jason Kenney now says Alberta can live with amended C-69 environmental assessment bill

In major reversal, Jason Kenney now says Alberta can live with amended C-69 environmental assessment bill Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and the leaders of the three other provincial parties are offering an olive branch to the Trudeau government on C-69, saying they're now prepared to accept the controversial overhaul of Canada's environmental assessment process — as long as the Senate's amendments are part of it. In a joint letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's point man in the Senate, Peter Harder, the multipartisan group asks the government to accept the changes to Bill C-69 — including amendments long demanded by oil and gas lobbyists — to avoid a constitutional fight over federal-provincial jurisdiction in natural resources.

Industry , Kenney pleased with energy - friendly proposed revamp of Bill C - 69 . Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines.

Olszynski says Bill C - 69 has been politicized to rile up populist sentiment against the governing Liberals, particularly in oil-reliant Alberta. Several energy - industry groups say Canada’s reputation has already taken a hit in the oil and gas sector due Bill C - 69 is set to receive royal assent on Friday.

Sen. Doug Black of Alberta says the bill, in its "revamped" form, should satisfy Kenney.

"I believe it's a package that's going to work to allow projects to be built in Canada and to ensure that investment comes back to Canada while respecting the environment and our obligations to First Nations people. So we may be on the verge of a win-win here after a very, very long fight," Black told CBC Calgary News at 6.

But the fight's not over, added Black.

The Senate as a whole must now decide whether to accept or reject the amendments, which environmentalists say would gut the bill.

Industry, Kenney pleased with energy-friendly proposed revamp of Bill C-69© Justin Tang/Canadian Press Tim McMillan, Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers' president and CEO, says CAPP will be encouraging the federal government to accept the amendments.

Next steps

Alberta Sen. Paula Simons, who sits on the energy committee, called the amendments an imperfect but pragmatic solution.

Senate committee passes majority of amendments for Bill C-69

Senate committee passes majority of amendments for Bill C-69 A Senate energy committee has adopted a vast majority of amendments to Bill C-69, but Alberta's premier says it's still too early to celebrate.

Oil industry executives decried it as a bill that would prevent any new major energy projects from ever being built while Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says the bill is a nightmare for national unity. Senate committee approves dozens of energy - industry - friendly amendments to C - 69 .

Conservative and Independent senators on the energy committee are proposing major rewrites of Bill C - 69 , with many of the proposed changes aimed at clarifying language around the scope and the length of the assessment process, the role of the environment minister and how much public

"I think we've presented amendments that make the bill significantly better, and I think the government has shown a willingness to consider a significant number of those amendments, so fingers crossed."

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has indicated the government is open to amending the bill, but he and Environment Minister Catherine McKenna have refused to comment on amendments proposed by senators until the upper house makes a final decision on them.

The Senate energy committee's amendments will now go before the full Senate, where further amendments may be proposed. If the Senate approves the bill in its revamped form, the legislation will go to the House of Commons for deliberation.

Kenney says he will meet with senators next week in Edmonton for lunch, and has invited Opposition Leader Rachel Notley along with him.

"She is happy to do so. This issue goes beyond partisan politics, and we will work with the Government of Alberta and all stakeholders to see this bill fixed or tossed out," said NDP spokesperson Matt Dykstra in an emailed statement.

The amendments to C-69 come less than 24 hours after another Senate committee voted to kill the Trudeau  government's proposed ban on oil tankers on the coast of northern British Columbia.

The ban was promised by Trudeau during the 2015 election campaign.

The full Senate must still weigh in on that decision.

Read more

Kenney followed the rules by claiming mom's basement as primary residence, board decides.
While conservative MPs on the Board of Internal Economy were satisfied with the ruling, they called the process a partisan attack and warned they could dig into historical expense claims, as well. "I think, quite frankly, this board should be very concerned that this process was engaged for what can only be determined to have been partisan considerations to affect the ability of Mr. Kenney to conduct his campaign to become premier of Alberta," said MP Mark Strahl. "So, quite frankly, I think this was a very disturbing case, because we can all play this game.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!