Money: Ban on single-use plastics could be boon for Ontario forestry industry - PressFrom - Canada
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MoneyBan on single-use plastics could be boon for Ontario forestry industry

08:05  12 june  2019
08:05  12 june  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

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Ontario is weighing a ban on single - use plastics as part of a broader strategy to send less waste to landfills. Ontario government open to ban on single - use plastics . Allison Jones, The Canadian Press Published Sunday, March 10, 2019 9:50 AM EDT Last Updated Sunday, March 10, 2019 2

Ban on single-use plastics could be boon for Ontario forestry industry© CBC The Domtar plant in Espanola is one of the few paper mills still operating in northern Ontario, thanks largely to the specialty products its 400 workers make.

Northern Ontario forestry producers are hoping the Canadian economy is about to trade plastic for paper.

The federal government wants to ban single use plastics like straws and forks, as early as 2021, and the Forest Products Association of Canada is hoping that wood and paper will take their place.

Bob Larocque, senior vice-president of the group, says this would open new markets for northern Ontario mills.

"This will be new types of end product development that will require the current products that are being made by the northern pulp and paper facilities," Larocque said. "It's creating and maintaining a more diverse market than we have today, so that's incredibly helpful for our current facilities."

Ottawa pledges to spend $15 million to restore Ontario's tree-planting program

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Ontario is weighing a ban on single - use plastics , which include bags, water bottles and straws. One question it asks is if a ban on single - use plastics would be effective in reducing plastic waste. (Darren Staples/Reuters). The Canadian Plastics Industry Association did not respond to requests

Aside from the 2021 complete ban on plenty of singleuse products, the use of plastics for which no Garbage patches reaching ludicrous areas can be found pretty much anywhere, from the Lest we forget, the plastic manufacturing industry is a colossus that has a huge influence over countries’

Larocque says they're working on substituting their own products for ones that will be most affected by the government ban.

"For example, we can make packaging that would replace Tupperware or plastic bags," he says. "But we're also working with them to replace plastic-type chemistry to make water bottles, for example, with chemicals that come from a tree."

Domtar paper in Espanola has already shifted to making specialty paper products, such as the takeout bags at Tim Hortons.

But Larocque says the forest industry as a whole is at least a few years away from being ready to replace plastic products.

How some small businesses are ditching plastic.
Some B.C., businesses were already making the move away from single-use plastics before there was talk of a nationwide plastic ban.

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