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MoneyBoeing changes executive in charge of the 737 Max factory

11:01  12 july  2019
11:01  12 july  2019 Source:   msn.com

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The executive who manages the Boeing 737 Max program and the Seattle-area factory where the now-grounded plane is built is retiring. Eric Lindblad has been in the job less than a year, taking over as Boeing struggled with shortages of engines and fuselages from suppliers. A Boeing spokesman said

The executive who manages the Boeing 737 Max program and the Seattle-area factory where the now-grounded plane is built is retiring. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story. CHICAGO (AP) — The executive who manages the Boeing

Boeing changes executive in charge of the 737 Max factory© Thomson Reuters Unpainted Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Renton Municipal Airport near the Boeing Renton facility in Renton, Washington, U.S. July 1, 2019. Picture taken July 1, 2019. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson CHICAGO — The executive who manages the Boeing 737 Max program and the Seattle-area factory where the now-grounded plane is built is retiring.

The manager, Eric Lindblad, said he planned to retire last summer, and a Boeing spokesman said Thursday that Lindblad's decision was unrelated to two deadly accidents involving Max jets.

Lindblad has been in the job less than a year, taking over as Boeing struggled with shortages of engines and fuselages from suppliers. He has been with Boeing 34 years.

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The executive who manages the Boeing 737 Max program and the Seattle-area factory where the now-grounded plane is built is retiring. FILE - In this May 19, 2016, file photo, Eric Lindblad, vice president in charge of the Boeing 777X wing, looks over the "clean" room area of the new 777X

Friday, July 12, 2019 Boeing changes executive in charge of the 737 Max factory | Sky U.S CHICAGO (AP) — The executive who manages the Boeing 737 Max

Lindblad will be replaced over the next several weeks by Mark Jenks, a vice-president who oversees possible development of a new mid-size plane that would start flying around 2025. Jenks previously managed the Boeing 787, which was grounded in 2013 after batteries overheated on several planes.

Mike Sinnett, a product-strategy executive who has talked to airline pilots and reporters about the flight-control system on the Max, will take over the mid-size plane program.

The 737 Max was grounded in March after crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people. Preliminary reports highlighted the role of new flight-control software that pushed the planes' noses down. Boeing hopes to submit a fix to federal safety regulators in September.

Airbus takes lead over Boeing in 2019 aircraft deliveries

Airbus takes lead over Boeing in 2019 aircraft deliveries CHICAGO — Deliveries of Boeing airliners tumbled 37% in the first half of 2019 as the company struggled to fix its bestselling plane after two deadly crashes, and Europe's Airbus surged far ahead in the competition between the world's leading aircraft manufacturers 

CHICAGO (AP) — The executive who manages the Boeing 737 Max program and the Seattle-area factory where the now-grounded plane is built is retiring. The change in leadership of the Max program was announced in a letter to employees from Kevin McAllister, chief of Boeing ’s commercial

Ed Pierson, a former senior manager at the 737 factory , believes production problems may have But the company kept producing planes and did not make major changes in response to his complaints. His account of the disarray lends new weight to reports that Boeing rushed the 737 Max to market

The Max is critical to Boeing's future; the company has a backlog of about 4,500 orders from around the world. But Boeing's orders and deliveries have tumbled this year — falling far behind Airbus — while it faces investigations and has suspended deliveries of the Max.

The change in leadership of the Max program was announced in a letter to employees from Kevin McAllister, chief of Boeing's commercial airplanes business. He said during his time running the 737 program, Lindblad "has navigated some of the most difficult challenges our company has ever faced."

Lindblad said in a letter to employees that he planned to retire last summer but accepted the assignment to take over the Max program.

"There are still challenging times ahead once the MAX safely returns to service," he wrote. "But this team has always done what it takes to succeed."

Boeing Co. shares rose $6.70, or 1.9%, to close at $359.

The Associated Press

Read more

Boeing insists fix to 737 Max software will 'get it right,' but flights are likely still months off.
It's the height of the summer travel season, and if the country's major airports are anything to go by, commercial flights are humming along at a brisk clip, but there's not a 737 Max jet in sight — and likely won't be for months. Boeing's bestselling plane, which was grounded last March after two 737 Max jets crashed, killing 346 people, including 18 Canadians and at least four permanent residents of Canada, likely won't be back in operation until December or January 2020, industry watchers predict. That doesn't mean that Boeing has stopped making the planes.

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