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Money Abandoned businesses where nature is taking over

13:50  08 november  2019
13:50  08 november  2019 Source:   lovemoney.com

Mother Nature spooks Montreal, others into postponing trick-or-treating

  Mother Nature spooks Montreal, others into postponing trick-or-treating MONTREAL — Mother Nature's scary weather forecast has spooked some Quebec towns and cities — including Montreal — into postponing trick-or-treating festivities until Friday. What began with a handful of suburban towns opting to push back Halloween celebrations due to heavy rain and strong winds in the forecast for Thursday evening culminated with Montreal, Longueuil and most major towns south of the city also announcing plans to postpone.What began with a handful of suburban towns opting to push back Halloween celebrations due to heavy rain and strong winds in the forecast for Thursday evening culminated with Montreal, Longueuil and most major towns south of the city also announcing plans to postpone.

But there are some premises where nature has taken over places long forgotten by humans. From a plant-covered cinema to an abandoned lab and a penguin takeover at an old whaling station, here are the abandoned businesses where wildlife has fought back.

Soon, the forces of nature began to take over . Now most of the village is covered in plants and vines. This striking phenomenon has made the abandoned town a popular tourist attraction in recent years, and those looking for breathtaking photo opportunities are not disappointed.

a close up of text on a whiteboard: The provincial government sets the budget for the Alberta Energy Regulator, but the oil and gas industry funds the regulator through administrative fees.© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation The provincial government sets the budget for the Alberta Energy Regulator, but the oil and gas industry funds the regulator through administrative fees.

These are strange days at the Alberta Energy Regulator.

Weeks after the provincial government removed its board and launched a review of the agency, three investigations detailed gross mismanagement and a culture of fear inside the industry watchdog.

Then, the same week Finance Minister Travis Toews unveiled a provincial budget that includes reductions to the AER's ranks, the regulator announced its three executive vice-presidents were no longer with the organization.

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Nature quickly got to work. Sprouting trees broke through sidewalks; thick The East River insistently lapped at the island’s fringes, eventually wearing down barriers and swallowing a road that once circled its outer edge, leaving only a manhole cover and a bit of brick where veterans and nurses once strolled.

Nature takes back Untouched Abandoned House - Urbex Finland - Продолжительность: 17:30 Syrbex Finland Exploration Recommended for you. Brand New Japanese House Tour - Продолжительность: 17:53 Life Where I'm From Recommended for you.

Change is definitely blowing through the halls of the regulator.

"We're doing a full review of the AER and its mandate, its governance structure and its operational practices," Energy Minister Sonya Savage told reporters ahead of the provincial budget last month.

That's no small endeavour.

The AER is one of Alberta's most recognized public agencies. It oversees the massive energy sector and is expected to ensure the safe and environmentally responsible development of the industry.

If the province is going to shake up or refocus the organization, it may also want to ask how it can help rebuild confidence in the agency and, fundamentally, what kind of regulator Alberta needs.

These questions aren't easily answered, particularly now.

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The photographs in Naturalia: Reclaimed by Nature were taken in over 30 countries across four continents. "It is poetic, even magic, to see nature retaking WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. It is the essential source of information and ideas that make sense of a world in constant transformation.

Abandoned Shopping Mall Taken Over By Fish In Bangkok. Man Opens Up A Barbershop Where Men Can Share Their Past Trauma So That It Doesn't Affect Their Relationships.

The oil and gas industry — the biggest cog in the provincial economy — continues to struggle to regain its footing while it is under heightened scrutiny for its environmental legacy and the effects of climate change.

Not that Alberta hasn't dealt with big challenges before.

The province's first regulator was created in 1938 amid fears that if industry was left unchecked, the race to get rich by drilling fastest could damage oil reservoirs and nip the sector in the bud.

Though they were not popular with everyone, rules were established with the public interest in mind.

The regulator has undergone several evolutions since then. The AER was created in 2013 with a mandate to ensure orderly and efficient resource development, but safe and environmentally responsible, too.

The Progressive Conservative government said then it would streamline processes, saving megaproject developers months of waiting for approvals while allowing Alberta to focus more effectively on its environmental priorities.

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‘I always found topics that brought me to buy a plane ticket and go away, most of the time alone, to be in direct contact with local cultures.’ As part of his travels, Jonk has dedicated himself to capturing snaps of abandoned places taken over by nature – old buildings decorated in graffiti and crawling

Soon, the forces of nature began to take over . Now, most of the village is covered in plants and vines. This striking phenomenon has made the abandoned Xu Yueding and his wife Tang Yaxue, who left the village over 20 years ago, come back every day to their former house to welcome visiting tourists

In time, however, industry complained of slow approval times, while environmentalists brought attention to the growing and costly legacy of aging energy infrastructure like orphaned pipelines and oil wells.

a person standing in front of a wall: During a press conference in September, Alberta Energy Minister Sonya Savage said the government would review the regulator.© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation During a press conference in September, Alberta Energy Minister Sonya Savage said the government would review the regulator.

Then three provincial probes into the AER found its senior leadership had shifted much of their focus to an international side project called ICORE.

Its operation led to questions about the priorities and oversight of the AER as well as the treatment of staff, many of whom were worried speaking out would cost them their jobs.

It's the kind of scandal that could invite big change.

The government's vision includes a "leaner" regulator that more "efficiently manages industry investments," according to budget documents. It says total savings to industry are expected to be $147 million over four years.

The agency is funded through administrative levies charged to industry. It says it has less than 1,160 full-time employees, though its numbers will decrease further over the next few months.  Budget documents show the number positions will drop to 970 this year.

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An old abandoned paper factory where nature is taking over . Once he finds the hidden sites, they're usually locked down tight. Shot in an old abandoned swimming pool where woman and men had a separate entrances. The doors you see lead to small rooms with bath tubs or tanning (beds).

Photographer Johnny Joo has travelled the United States photographing overgrown derelict sites from fairgrounds to shopping malls.

But cutting resources is not where the review's focus should be, says Nikki Way, a senior analyst for the Pembina Institute, a clean-energy think-tank.

She said the AER had the right intentions when it was created with a mandate that includes environmentally responsible development. What the government should review is where the AER directs its resources, she says.

a machine on a dry grass field: The regulator oversees oil and gas development across Alberta. © Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation The regulator oversees oil and gas development across Alberta.

"We've seen a lot of resources invested in two programs that speed up and accelerate timelines for the approvals of projects, which I think is not a bad thing," Way said.

"But if those savings don't go back to programs that deal with cumulative effects, with reducing [greenhouse gas] emissions, in dealing with other environmental concerns that are increasingly becoming problematic in Alberta, then the regulator has lost track of what it needs to do."

'A credible regulator is essential'

She is concerned a smaller budget will mean the programs intended to fulfil the agency's environmental mandate will continue to be underfunded or even make the situation worse.

"A credible regulator is essential," Way said. "If Albertans don't have confidence we have a regulator that upholds the regulations we tout as world class, those regulations don't mean much in practice."

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Nature always seems to find a way, especially in areas abandoned by humans. Check out these 9 amazing example of nature reclaiming her land. After the mines were exhausted, the village was abandoned in 1954. Now the desert is taking over and returning the former village to nature .

Conventional wisdom says that an abandoned area will start to look like a forest in about five years. You can see that the roof has deteriorated to the point where anything can get inside. You shouldn’t have to worry about a roof collapsing but here are some signs other parts of your house are failing.

Neil McCrank, chairman of one of the regulator's predecessors, the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, from 1998 to 2007, believes there are fundamental issues the government should examine.

McCrank said the government should decide whether the regulator is going to be truly independent. He said some provinces, like Saskatchewan, deal with regulatory matters inside government. But if Alberta wants the organization to run as an independent agency, it should ensure that it really is.

McCrank also believes it may be time to evaluate the structure atop the organization, from the board to the C-suite. If the AER is going to keep a board of directors, its responsibilities must be clear, he said. The auditor general's report on ICORE found the AER's board did not have all the skills to conduct proper oversight.

Finally, McCrank says there's a discussion to be had about how the AER is funded. For decades, its funding was shared between the government and industry, though the sector gradually ended up paying most of it. These days it's funded solely by industry.

"I think if the government, on behalf of the people, is paying half of the cost of the regulator and the industry is paying the other half, there seems to be a balance," McCrank said.

a group of people sitting at a table in front of a curtain: Alberta Ethics Commissioner Marguerite Trussler, left, Public Interest Commissioner Marianne Ryan, centre, and Auditor General Doug Wylie speak in Edmonton on Oct. 4 about findings from their independent investigations into AER activities.© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Alberta Ethics Commissioner Marguerite Trussler, left, Public Interest Commissioner Marianne Ryan, centre, and Auditor General Doug Wylie speak in Edmonton on Oct. 4 about findings from their independent investigations into AER activities.

Canada's oilpatch has struggled to attract investment in recent years, while the U.S. has slashed taxes and red tape for its sector. Some believe changes at the regulator could make Alberta more competitive.

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Now that humans no longer walk through the environment, plants have sprung up and have taken on a life of their own. “I have visited over three hundred abandoned sites in the last three years and I have seen several places that I could call my favourite.

Hover over the profile pic and click the Following button to unfollow any account. Say a lot with a little. When you see a Tweet you love, tap the heart — it lets the person who wrote it "@AbandonedPosts: Abandoned house with nature taking over . pic.twitter.com/sdMx6WCTYx" dream house @jmlc_20.

Groups like the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), with a membership that produces most of the country's oil and gas, sees a more focused and efficient regulator as something that could help the sector. Greater regulatory certainty, they say, will result in increased capital investment.

In a submission to the government last month, CAPP and other industry associations said timelines for application decisions can be lengthy and highly variable. That is a competitiveness risk for the sector, it says.

They say the regulator needs to focus on key roles, like making sound and timely development decisions. What it shouldn't do, in their opinion, is stray outside its mandate, like spending money on scientific studies where a direct link to AER jurisdiction isn't clear.

"It's going to take some tough decisions and some strong focus, but at the end of the day, this is going to be critical to re-establishing and asserting Alberta competitiveness," said CAPP vice-president Ben Brunnen.

"It's one of the key levers that the Alberta government has to strengthen the competitiveness of the industry."

Brian Fleck, an AER board member from 2017 until September, said the agency has taken steps to cut red tape and duplication in its approvals processes, including the use of an online tool that reduces paperwork. When the province unveiled the new approach last year, it said it should ultimately save the industry more than $600 million annually.

In his opinion, it's important the AER continue with those efforts.

With the UCP government declaring that it wants Alberta to be one of North America's most attractive places to do business, one might expect a retooling of its energy regulator with that in mind.

But many people in and outside Alberta will also be watching to see the government's actions don't come at the expense of safe and environmentally responsible development. That's still a part of the AER's mandate.

Alberta's regulator has faced challenges before, but this could be among its biggest yet.

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