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Money Boeing 737 missing in Indonesia: black box recordings can be read

11:05  15 january  2021
11:05  15 january  2021 Source:   ouest-france.fr

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Rescue teams in Indonesia resumed their search for the Boeing Co. jet carrying 62 people after uncovering debris that are “strongly suspected” to be part of Sriwijaya Air Flight SJ182, which has been missing since Saturday afternoon. Emergency signals transmitted by two devices have been

The Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737 -500 lost contact shortly after takeoff on Saturday from Jakarta with 62 people on board. It was heading for Pontianak in West Kalimantan, a journey that takes about 90 "We are doing our best to save the victims. We pray together so that the victims can be found," he said.

Des équipes de recherche mènent des opérations en mer depuis la disparition d’un Boeing 737-200 en Indonésie le 9 janvier dernier. Ce vendredi 15 janvier, les enquêteurs indonésiens ont pu extraire les enregistrements de l’une des boîtes noires. © ADEK BERRY / AFP Search teams have been carrying out operations at sea since the disappearance of a Boeing 737-200 in Indonesia on January 9. This Friday, January 15, Indonesian investigators were able to extract the tapes from one of the black boxes.

Indonesian investigators announced this Friday, December 15, that they were able to extract the recordings from one of the black boxes of a Boeing that crashed at sea with 62 people on board last weekend and start their work.

According to authorities, the recordings of a black box of a Boeing 737 which crashed at sea with 62 people on board last weekend , are readable.

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" Black boxes " from a passenger plane that crashed into the sea soon after take-off in Indonesia on Aircraft parts and human remains have been found. The Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737 was carrying 62 The missing aircraft is not a 737 Max, the Boeing model that was grounded from March 2019 until

Indonesian authorities have retrieved one of two black boxes , the Flight Data Recorder , from a Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737 -500 that crashed into the Java Sea on Saturday. The recordings are housed inside crash-survivable containers able to withstand 3,400 times the force of gravity on impact.

The records "are in good condition and we are now examining the data" , said Soerjanto Tjahjono, head of the Indonesian Transport Safety Committee who is helping to investigate the causes of the Boeing 737 crash.

La black box (FDR) which records the flight parameters, was recovered at sea on Tuesday January 12 and could provide valuable clues to understand the causes of the disaster.

Sriwijaya Air's Boeing 737-500 on Saturday January 9 shortly after take-off suddenly fell some 10,000 feet (3,000 meters) in less than a minute and plunged into the Java Sea.

Some 3,000 people mobilized

The divers are still looking for the second black box of the device which contains the recordings of the cockpit conversations.

Investigators are also looking to recover human remains, pieces of the fuselage and debris from the Boeing at sea.

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The Boeing 737 -500 jet crashed into the Java Sea on Saturday four minutes after takeoff from Jakarta's main airport. Investigators will rely heavily on the two Indonesia 's transport ministry said on Tuesday the plane, which was grounded during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, had passed an

The Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737 lost contact en route to Pontianak in West Kalimantan province, officials said. Flight tracking website Flightradar24.com said the aircraft had lost more than 3,000m (10,000ft) in altitude in less than a minute. The transport ministry said search and rescue efforts were under way.

Some 3000 people are mobilized as well as dozens of boats and helicopters for this research off Jakarta.

Authorities have not given any explanation at this stage for the crash of a 26 year old plane.

Authorities explained that the crew had not issued a distress signal before the accident and that the aircraft was probably still intact when it touched the water. The investigation could take several months.

The regional company Sriwijaya Air has not experienced major accidents since its creation in 2003 but the air transport sector in Indonesia has regularly experienced disasters in recent years and several airlines from this country have been banned in Europe until in 2018.

The Boeing 737 MAX is again authorized to fly in Europe .
© Supplied by Le Point Boeing The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) announced on Wednesday that it had given its official green light to return to flight in the European sky of the Boeing 737 MAX, grounded for twenty-two months after two fatal accidents. “After a thorough analysis by EASA, we determined that the 737 MAX could safely return to service .

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