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Money Expect to pay more for your Timmies, says analyst

16:23  12 january  2018
16:23  12 january  2018 Source:   thestar.com

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At least one analyst believes Tim Hortons customers will ultimately pay more for their double-doubles after a A spokesperson for the association said it now represents 60 per cent of Tim Hortons franchise owners across the country and has had no indication that RBI will allow menu price increases.

Expect to pay more for your Timmies , says analyst . Timmies , the ex-franchisee continues, was a signature smooth taste, in his view, developed and supplied by Mother Parkers back when Tim Horton was playing for the Leafs.

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Tims customers fight cutbacks at rallies

  Tims customers fight cutbacks at rallies TORONTO - Protesters who rallied outside Tim Hortons locations across Ontario on Wednesday roasted some franchisees for slashing workers' benefits and breaks in an effort to compensate for the province's minimum wage hike, but many said their gripes would not derail their daily coffee runs. Those who gathered said they were worried staff would be negatively impacted if they boycotted to spite the small handful of franchisees — not necessarily the 16 locations that were targeted — who demanded workers cover a larger share of their dental and health-care benefits and take unpaid breaks to offset the 20 per cent raise to $14 an hour.

Expect to pay more for your Timmies , says analyst . “The reality is that the franchisor is not exerting significant control over their franchisees,” counters Ryan Eickmeier, Vice President of Government Relations & Public Policy for the Canadian Franchise Association.

Expect to pay more for your Timmies , says analyst . Tim Hortons locations hit by protests over wage clawbacks. Opinion | Edward Keenan: Timmies ’ warm-and-fuzzy brand identity becomes faded and torn.

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At least one analyst believes Tim Hortons customers will ultimately pay more for their double-doubles after a backlash sparked by cuts to employee benefits by some franchise owners linked to the increase in Ontario’s minimum wage.

“We believe that [Tim Hortons’ parent Restaurant Brands International Inc.] will eventually allow some menu price increases and franchisees will make adjustments,” Peter Sklar, retailing analyst at BMO Capital Markets, said in a note to investors Thursday.

He said stock in Restaurant Brands International (RBI) has come under pressure due to negative media reports related to cost control steps by franchisees, including cutting employee hours, eliminating paid breaks and reducing the subsidy of employee benefits.

“These measures have been perceived negatively by the press, with the media painting the franchisees as villains, and the Ontario government referring to certain franchisees as ‘bullies,’” Sklar wrote in his note.

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You’ve already set your price as “free”, they aren’t going to pay more . Yup, without your own boundaries you certainly can’t expect your prospects to set them for you. I tried it with one client and cringed inwardly waiting for her response but she said she was happy to pay for my time.

Pressed to elaborate on what “over time” actually meant, Maestri said Apple would say more in its next quarterly report, when the company typically updates its shareholder-return plans. The bulk of that money will likely head right back to investors.

There has also been a social media movement to boycott some Tim Hortons franchises.

“While the direct impact on profitability is at the franchisee level and should not impact RBI's corporate results (as royalties are based on revenue, not profits), there are still two potential negatives related to the minimum wage increase and resultant public backlash,” he wrote.

The move by some Tim Hortons franchise owners to cut employee hours, eliminate paid breaks and reduce employee benefits after Ontario raised its minimum wage has sparked a public backlash.© Steve Russell The move by some Tim Hortons franchise owners to cut employee hours, eliminate paid breaks and reduce employee benefits after Ontario raised its minimum wage has sparked a public backlash.

“First, as franchisees have reduced employee hours, there may be longer lines in (Tim Hortons) stores, resulting in weaker financial results. Second, if Canadians are sympathetic to the TH employees and the consumer boycott is meaningful and sustained, it could also impact sales.”

On Jan. 1 the minimum wage in Ontario increased to $14 per hour from $11.60, a 21-per-cent jump, which along with other labour law changes, will cost the average franchise owner more than $200,000 per year, the Great White North Franchisee Association estimates. The association was formed in 2017 to combat what it calls mismanagement by Tim Hortons corporate parents.

RBI, which is majority owned by Brazilian investment company 3G Capital, controls the Tim Hortons menu board and pricing, and some members of the association, a group RBI calls “rogue” and unsanctioned, have reportedly resorted to cost control measures targetting employees.

A spokesperson for the association said it now represents 60 per cent of Tim Hortons franchise owners across the country and has had no indication that RBI will allow menu price increases. She said the association also wants RBI to lower prices for food and other materials it supplies to the outlets.

An analysis by Bloomberg Intelligence said RBI, focused on controlling franchise costs, is unlikely to allow any price increase until lawsuits filed by franchise owners against corporate owners relating to pricing and other issues are resolved.

A spokesperson for RBI, which also controls Burger King and Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Why Tim Hortons’ foul play gives unions a big assist .
There’s a missing ingredient in the battle still brewing at Tim Hortons.Never mind the conventional narrative of family-owned businesses versus their vulnerable employees. It has more to do with the economic power imbalance when business (big and small) wages war against minimum wage workers who aren’t organized to fight back.By organized, I mean unionized.The protective power of unions has been missing from much of the sound and fury over a bunch of Tim Hortons outlets clawing back paid breaks and tips. This isn’t about ideology but practicality.

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