•   
  •   
  •   

Money This is what your smartphone is doing to your brain -- and it isn't good

05:55  11 march  2018
05:55  11 march  2018 Source:   businessinsider.com

HTC confirms US layoffs and will combine its smartphone and VR divisions

  HTC confirms US layoffs and will combine its smartphone and VR divisions HTC has laid off several employees from its US offices, as reported by Digital Trends and independently confirmed by The Verge. The Taiwan-based company has laid off a significant but unspecified number of its US-based staff, keeping only HTC Global employees in US offices. According to an anonymous source cited by Digital Trends, the number is between a few dozen to around 100 people.

That doesn' t mean that using your phone for searching causes you to be "dumber," it could just be that these smarties are searching less because they Lustig says that even these kinds of apps aren' t inherently evil. They only become a problem when they are given free rein to interrupt us, tugging at

That doesn' t mean that using your phone for searching causes you to be "dumber," it could just be that these smarties are searching less because they Lustig says that even these kinds of apps aren' t inherently evil. They only become a problem when they are given free reign to interrupt us, tugging at

Dopamine versus serotonin top image© Provided by Business Insider Dopamine versus serotonin top image

All day long, we're inundated by interruptions and alerts from our devices. Smartphones buzz to wake us up, emails stream into our inboxes, notifications from coworkers and far away friends bubble up on our screens, and "assistants" chime in with their own soulless voices.

Such interruptions seem logical to our minds: we want technology to help with our busy lives, ensuring we don't miss important appointments and communications.

But our bodies have a different view: These constant alerts jolt our stress hormones into action, igniting our flight or flight response; our heartbeats quicken, our breathing tightens, our sweat glands burst open, and our muscles contract. That response is intended to help us outrun danger, not answer a call or text from a colleague.

Huawei made a Porsche slightly autonomous with a smartphone

  Huawei made a Porsche slightly autonomous with a smartphone With no flagship phone to show off to the assembled mass of journalists, bloggers and tech execs, Huawei took a different tack this year at MWC. If it wasn't slick laptops with pop-up webcams, then it's this: The "RoadReader." To showcase the company's AI push (read: remind everyone it's really into this neural processing gig), the Huawei used its Mate 10 Pro smartphone as a lightweight autonomous car brain, inside a Porsche, right outside FC Barcelona's stadium. I was one of the lucky few to experience what it's like to be driven around by an Android phone.

That doesn't mean that using your phone for searching causes you to be "dumber," it could just be that these smarties are searching less because they know more. This technique isn ' t just used by social media, it 's all over the internet. Airline fares that drop at the click of a mouse.

Smartphones and social media are changing the way our brains work. Scientists are zeroing in on what’s happening, and the problems may go well beyond addiction.

We are simply not built to live like this.

woman phone smartphone© Provided by Business Insider woman phone smartphone

Our apps are taking advantage of our hard-wired needs for security and social interaction and researchers are starting to see how terrible this is for us. A full 89% of college students now report feeling "phantom" phone vibrations, imagining their phone is summoning them to attention when it hasn't actually buzzed.

Another 86% of Americans say they check their email and social media accounts "constantly," and that it's really stressing them out.

Endocrinologist Robert Lustig tells Business Insider that notifications from our phones are training our brains to be in a nearly constant state of stress and fear by establishing a stress-fear memory pathway. And such a state means that the prefrontal cortex, the part of our brains that normally deals with some of our highest-order cognitive functioning, goes completely haywire, and basically shuts down.

Google Maps lets businesses promote themselves as women-led

  Google Maps lets businesses promote themselves as women-led Businesses can now describe themselves in Google Maps listings as being owned, led or founded by women, the Alphabet Inc unit announced Wednesday.The feature would roll out this week in celebration of International Women’s Day, on March 8, Google said in a blog post.

That doesn’t mean that using your phone for searching causes you to be “dumber,” it could just be that these smarties are searching less because they know more. This technique isn ’ t just used by social media, it ’s all over the internet. Airline fares that drop at the click of a mouse.

New research suggests that some of us are relying on our phones instead of our brains — and it isn ' t good . Lethargic thinking isn ' t the only negative effect of smartphones . Research shows that phones may be hurting our health and happiness in more ways than one.

"You end up doing stupid things," Lustig says. "And those stupid things tend to get you in trouble."

Your brain can only do one thing at a time

Scientists have known for years what people often won't admit to themselves: humans can't really multi-task. This is true for almost all of us: about 97.5% of the population. The other 2.5% have freakish abilities; scientists call them "super taskers," because they can actually successfully do more than one thing at once. They can drive while talking on the phone, without compromising their ability to gab or shift gears.

How dopamine and serotonin circulate differently in the brain© Provided by Business Insider How dopamine and serotonin circulate differently in the brain

But since only about 1 in 50 people are super taskers, the rest of us mere mortals are really only focusing on just one thing at a time. That means every time we pause to answer a new notification or get an alert from a different app on our phone, we're being interrupted, and with that interruption we pay a price: something called a "switch cost."

Android beats iOS in smartphone loyalty, study finds

  Android beats iOS in smartphone loyalty, study finds Samsung's new Galaxy S9 may not quite live up to the iPhone X when it comes to Samsung's implementation of a Face ID-style system or its odd take on AR emoji. But that's not going to matter much to Samsung device owners - not only because the S9 is a good smartphone overall, but because Android users just aren't switching to iPhone anymore. In fact, Android users have higher loyalty than iOS users do, according to a new report today from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP).The research firm found that Android brand loyalty has been remaining steadily high since early 2016, and remains at the highest levels ever seen.

Your phone is a keeping you in a constant state of stress, warn scientists. But this isn ' t how we're actually built to live, according to scientists. And the latest research shows our phones could be taking advantage of our need for security and social interaction in ways that could negatively impact our

"What would it cost police to wait 60 minutes after a Taser deployment before engaging suspects in custodial interrogations?" the study asks. The percentage of police departments armed with these weapons gets even larger among police departments that cover larger populations.

Sometimes the switch from one task to another costs us only a few tenths of a second, but in a day of flip-flopping between ideas, conversations, and transactions on a phone or computer, our switch costs can really add up, and make us more error-prone, too. Psychologist David Meyer who's studied this effect estimates that shifting between tasks can use up as much as 40% of our otherwise productive brain time.

Every time we switch tasks, we're also shooting ourselves up with a dose of the stress hormone cortisol, Lustig says. The switching puts our thoughtful, reasoning prefrontal cortex to sleep, and kicks up dopamine, our brain's addiction chemical.

In other words, the stress that we build up by trying to do many things at once when we really can't is making us sick, and causing us to crave even more interruptions, spiking dopamine, which perpetuates the cycle.

More phone time, lazier brain

Our brains can only process so much information at a time, about 60 bits per second.

The more tasks we have to do, the more we have to choose how we want to use our precious brain power. So its understandable that we might want to pass some of our extra workload to our phones or digital assistants.

Scott Baio Confirms Wife’s New Health Crisis, Diagnosed With Microvascular Brain Disease

  Scott Baio Confirms Wife’s New Health Crisis, Diagnosed With Microvascular Brain Disease Scott Baio Confirms Wife’s New Health Crisis, Diagnosed With Microvascular Brain DiseaseScott Baio's wife Renee had some sad news to share about her health, which the former "Happy Days" star confirmed via social media.

Blue light in your phone ’s screen tells your body that it ’s daytime – meaning you don’ t sleep as well. Harvard researchers found that blue light could Using your phone excessively can lead to a slump in creativity, say Bournemouth University researchers – and the devices should carry a health warning.

New research suggests that some of us are relying on our phones instead of our brains — and it isn ’ t good . Lethargic thinking isn ’ t the only negative effect of smartphones . Research shows that phones may be hurting our health and happiness in more ways than one.

But there is some evidence that delegating thinking tasks to our devices could not only be making our brains sicker, but lazier too.

The combination of socializing and using our smartphones could be putting a huge tax on our brains.

Researchers have found smarter, more analytical thinkers are less active on their smartphone search engines than other people. That doesn't mean that using your phone for searching causes you to be "dumber," it could just be that these smarties are searching less because they know more. But the link between less analytical thinking and more smartphone scrolling is there.

We also know that reading up on new information on your phone can be a terrible way to learn. Researchers have shown that people who take in complex information from a book, instead of on a screen, develop deeper comprehension, and engage in more conceptual thinking, too.

Brand new research on dozens of smartphone users in Switzerland also suggests that staring at our screens could be making both our brains and our fingers more jittery.

In research published this month, psychologists and computer scientists have found an unusual and potentially troubling connection: the more tapping, clicking and social media posting and scrolling people do, the "noisier" their brain signals become. That finding took the researchers by surprise. Usually, when we do something more often, we get better, faster and more efficient at the task.

10 best cheap smartphones 2018: affordable phones to suit any budget

  10 best cheap smartphones 2018: affordable phones to suit any budget Cheap phones which don't break the bank - get the latest handset features on a budgetWe think the Honor View 10 is the best cheap smartphone you can buy. It carries all of the Apple prestige and premium build quality, without the massive price tag.

Here’s what your smartphone is actually doing to your brain ( and it ’s pretty grim). Rob WaughMonday 12 Mar 2018 1:31 pm. Share this article via facebook Share this article via twitter Share this article via messenger. Share this with.

Think of the brain as a car. You have a Ferrari — and that 's like having a very smart , computationally advanced brain — but the gas pedal determines "One thing the smartphone might do is make it easier for us to not exercise our brain ," Pennycook said. " It doesn' t mean that we're making the car

But the researchers think there's something different going on when we engage in social media: the combination of socializing and using our smartphones could be putting a huge tax on our brains.

Social behavior, "may require more resources at the same time," study author Arko Ghosh said, from our brains to our fingers. And that's scary stuff.

Driving texting smartphone© Provided by Business Insider Driving texting smartphone

Should being on your phone in public be taboo?

Despite these troubling findings, scientists aren't saying that enjoying your favorite apps is automatically destructive. But we do know that certain types of usage seem especially damaging.

Checking Facebook has been proven to make young adults depressed. Researchers who've studied college students' emotional well-being find a direct link: the more often people check Facebook, the more miserable they are. But the incessant, misery-inducing phone checking doesn't just stop there. Games like Pokemon GO or apps like Twitter can be addictive, and will leave your brain craving another hit.

Teens Texting© Provided by Business Insider Teens Texting

Addictive apps are built to give your brain rewards, a spike of pleasure when someone likes your photo or comments on your post. Like gambling, they do it on an unpredictable schedule. That's called a "variable ratio schedule"and its something the human brain goes crazy for.

This technique isn't just used by social media, it's all over the internet. Airline fares that drop at the click of a mouse. Overstocked sofas that are there one minute and gone the next. Facebook notifications that change based on where our friends are and what they're talking about. We've gotta have it all, we've gotta have more, and we've gotta have it now. We're scratching addictive itches all over our screens.

Lustig says that even these kinds of apps aren't inherently evil. They only become a problem when they are given free reign to interrupt us, tugging at our brains' desire for tempting treats, tricking our brains into always wanting more.

"I'm not anti technology per se," he counters. "I'm anti variable-reward technology. Because that's designed very specifically to make you keep looking."

Lustig says he wants to change this by drawing boundaries around socially acceptable smartphone use. If we can make a smartphone addiction taboo (like smoking inside buildings, for example), people will at least have to sanction their phone time off to delegated places and times, giving their brains a break.

"My hope is that we will come to a point where you can't pull your cell phone out in public," Lustig says.

NOW WATCH: What would happen if humans tried to land on Jupiter

Google launches news initiative to combat fake news .
Alphabet Inc's (GOOGL.O) Google is launching the Google News Initiative, to weed out fake news online and during breaking news situations, it said in a blog post on Tuesday. Google said it plans to spend $300 million over the next three years to improve the accuracy and quality of news appearing on its platforms. The changes come as Google, Facebook Inc and Twitter Inc face a backlash over their role during the U.S. presidential election by allowing the spread of false and often malicious information that might have swayed voters toward Republican candidate Donald Trump.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!