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OffbeatGorillas pose for selfie with anti-poaching officers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

05:16  21 april  2019
05:16  21 april  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

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Two gorillas have been photographed posing for a relaxed selfie with the rangers who rescued them as babies. The image was taken at a gorilla orphanage in Virunga National Park, DR Congo , where the animals were raised after poachers The gorillas , he added, think of the rangers as their parents.

An anti - poaching ranger in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has described his striking selfie with a pair of endangered mountain gorillas as "just The selfie was taken with two endangered mountain gorillas in the Virunga National Park. Mr Shamavu's selfie grabbed international attention

Gorillas pose for selfie with anti-poaching officers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo © Provided by ABC News The two mountain gorillas were photographed at Congo's Virunga National Park.

An anti-poaching ranger in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has described his striking selfie with a pair of endangered mountain gorillas as "just another day in the office".

Virunga National Park anti-poaching ranger Mathieu Shamavu posted his selfie with the two gorillas on Facebook as part of his units' efforts to raise awareness and funds for the species at the UNESCO World Heritage site.

The image, featuring the two gorillas standing upright and looking at the camera, has grabbed international attention on social media, bringing the plight of the species into the spotlight.

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A third gorilla doesn't appear to mind being caught picking its nose as its friend appears to pose with its thumb in the air. Mr Karabaranga said: 'I think it's the Amazing pictures taken of orphaned gorillas in Virunga national park in Rumangabo, Democrtic Republic of Congo by their guardian Patrick Sadiki

Tbh the whole issue of anti - poaching in the Congo area is actually really complex, as this article suggests: Wildlife charities fund abuses of The two Congo Wars and ongoing conflict there mean that an entire ethnic group of humans is at risk as well as the gorillas , and there are no easy answers.

According to the Virunga National Park website, one third of the world's population of critically endangered mountain gorillas live in the region.

The park is protected by a team of more than 600 rangers, and is situated in a region of the country which has been impacted by war for more than 20 years.

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"These local men and women go through intensive training, risking their lives on a daily basis to safeguard the park's exceptional wildlife, including the last of the world's critically endangered mountain gorillas," the website says.

Facebook users thanked the rangers for their work protecting the species, with many donating money.

"Wow that is an awesome office you've got there," said one commenter of Mr Shamavu's workplace.

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