Offbeat: Indian temple helps nurture 'extinct' turtle back to life - - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

OffbeatIndian temple helps nurture 'extinct' turtle back to life

05:46  12 june  2019
05:46  12 june  2019 Source:   msn.com

'Jeopardy!' champ James Holzhauer donates $10,000 to a charity that helps kids from dropping out of school

'Jeopardy!' champ James Holzhauer donates $10,000 to a charity that helps kids from dropping out of school "Jeopardy!" champion James Holzhauer is donating $10,000 to an educational charity in Nevada, according to CNN affiliate KTNV. The lucky winner of a portion of the game show winner's money is Communities in Schools of Nevada, a state branch of a national organization that works to prevent students from dropping out of school. The charity said Holzhauer was perusing the Charity Navigator website and was impressed with the group's record of helping students graduate from Nevada schools.

An “ extinct ” species of turtle is being reintroduced to the wild after a small population was found flourishing in a pond at an Indian temple . The black softshell turtle (Nilssonia nigricans) was declared extinct in the wild 17 years ago by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

The black softshell turtle is officially extinct in the wild but a centuries-old temple in India , the adjoining pond and its nature-loving caretaker are

The black softshell turtle is officially extinct in the wild, but a centuries-old Indian temple and its nature-loving caretaker are helping the creature make a tentative comeback.

The northeastern state of Assam was once rich in freshwater turtles, but habitat loss and over-exploitation -- they were once a popular local food -- have massively depleted their population.

The black softshell turtle was declared extinct in the wild in 2002 by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, while the Indian softshell turtle and the Indian peacock softshell turtle are classified as vulnerable.

Speeding truck slams into Kingston home, leaving gaping hole in basement wall

Speeding truck slams into Kingston home, leaving gaping hole in basement wall "It's crazy. Extensive damage", says Khairullah. No one in the home or in the neighbourhood was injured, but there is now a gaping hole in the side of the house, seeing into the basement of the home. "We are actually going to have a look up here, apparently there is damage all the way down Glengarry," says Khairullah. "You can see where he went over our driveway and down." Police arrested a male driver at the scene and was transported to hospital. His injuries are unknown. Police have not said if alcohol or drugs were a factor.

The black softshell turtle is officially extinct in the wild, but a centuries-old Indian temple and its nature-loving caretaker are helping the creature

The black softshell turtle is officially extinct in the wild, but a centuries-old Indian temple and its nature-loving caretaker are helping the creature make a tentative comeback. The black softshell turtle was declared extinct in the wild in 2002 by the International Union for Conservation of Nature

Indian temple helps nurture 'extinct' turtle back to life
Indian temple helps nurture 'extinct' turtle back to life
Indian temple helps nurture 'extinct' turtle back to life

But all the while, the pond of the Hayagriva Madhav temple in the Hajo pilgrimage centre has provided a safe haven, thanks to the sacred status of turtles protecting them from harm.

"There are plenty of turtles in the temple pond," said Jayaditya Purkayastha, from conservation group Good Earth.

The group has teamed up with the temple authorities in a breeding programme.

Meet the Museum of Natural History's newest guest: a T. rex

Meet the Museum of Natural History's newest guest: a T. rex The newest guest at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History is a coveted Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. Curators have eagerly sought the skeleton for years.

HAJO ( INDIA ) - The black softshell turtle is officially extinct in the wild, but a centuries-old Indian temple and its nature-loving caretaker are helping The black softshell turtle was declared extinct in the wild in 2002 by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, while the Indian softshell turtle

The black softshell turtle was declared extinct in the wild as far back as 2002 The black softshell turtle is officially extinct in the wild, But, in a centuries-old temple in India , the adjoining pond and its nature-loving caretaker, are helping the creature make a tentative comeback, AFP reports.

"The population of the turtle in Assam has gone down by a great extent. So we thought we needed to intervene and do something to save the species from extinction," he told AFP.

In January his organisation's first batch of 35 turtle hatchlings, including 16 black softshells hand-reared at the temple, was released into a nearby wildlife sanctuary.

Indian temple helps nurture 'extinct' turtle back to life© Biju BORO Assam state was once rich in freshwater turtles, but habitat loss and over-exploitation have massively depleted their population

A key figure is the caretaker of the temple pond, Pranab Malakar, who long before environmentalists became involved took a keen interest in the turtles' wellbeing.

"I used to take care of them as I like them. Later, after I became associated with Good Earth, it became my responsibility," he said.

"No one harms them here as they are incarnations of Lord Vishnu (a Hindu deity). I was born and grew up here. We have been seeing the turtles since our childhood. People respect them," he said.

Feds have failed to explain 'inaction' in Grassy Narrows: UN rapporteur

Feds have failed to explain 'inaction' in Grassy Narrows: UN rapporteur OTTAWA — The case of a northern Ontario First Nation plagued by mercury contamination is "emblematic" of an overall pattern of inaction in the face of grave risks to the health of Indigenous Peoples, a United Nations human-rights expert said Thursday — the same day the community's chief came to Ottawa to urge action. Baskut Tuncak, the UN's special rapporteur on human rights and hazardous substances and wastes, said he has heard during a

Hajo ( India ) (AFP) – The black softshell turtle is officially extinct in the wild, but a centuries-old Indian temple and its nature-loving caretaker are helping The black softshell turtle was declared extinct in the wild in 2002 by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, while the Indian softshell turtle

The black softshell turtle is officially extinct in the wild, but a centuries-old Indian temple and its nature-loving caretaker are helping the creature make a tentative comeback. The northeastern state of Assam was once rich in freshwater turtles , but habitat loss and over-exploitation -- they were.

Indian temple helps nurture 'extinct' turtle back to life© Biju Boro

Malakar collects eggs laid by the turtles on the sandy banks of the pond -- a new concrete bank had to be demolished a few years ago -- and gingerly puts them into an incubator.

The project has been so successful that Good Earth has identified 18 other temple ponds in the area which could also be used for similar initiatives.

But it is not without its challenges.

For one thing, some of the hundreds of daily visitors to the temple outside Guwahati throw bread and other food to the turtles -- which they clearly like.

"This has triggered some biological changes among the turtles in the pond. They have also lost their natural tendency of hunting for food,” Purkayastha said.

Read more

Chief asks why the PM makes time for a Raptors parade but hasn't visited Grassy Narrows.
Grassy Narrows First Nation members are in Toronto as part of the community's campaign to secure construction and long-term funding for a care home for those poisoned by mercury pollution. © Rhiannon Johnson/CBC Grassy Narrows member Sandra Pahpasay at the design unveiling. A conceptual design for the mercury care home was unveiled Wednesday by Indigenous designer Bret Cardinal to media and community members. © Jody Porter/CBC New research shows more than 90 per cent of the population at Grassy Narrows First Nation is experiencing symptoms of mercury poisoning.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!