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OffbeatThese slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep

06:30  12 july  2019
06:30  12 july  2019 Source:   nationalgeographic.com

Zebrafish could teach humans a lot about the science of sleep

Zebrafish could teach humans a lot about the science of sleep Zebrafish share similar sleeping patterns to humans, which is helping researchers understand the origins of sleep. Proper sleep is more important than you might think. Zebrafish share similar sleeping patterns to humans, which is helping researchers un Coming up short on your recommended 7 hours of shut-eye? The consequences could be devastating. Not getting enough sleep can bust your metabolism and alter the behavior of your genes for years to come.

fish and mammals may offer clues about the evolution of sleep in our common ancestors, which Compared to the sleeping states, the awake brain in the zebrafish was very noisy, with chaotically But because the zebrafish sleep state is similar to ours, it suggests this type of sleep existed before

National Geographic. 28 mins ·. For the first time, researchers have identified sleep patterns in the brains of tiny zebrafish—and they look remarkably similar to the brain activity in sleeping humans. These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep .

These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep © Photograph by Blickwinkel, Alamy

Zebrafish, like the adult seen here, seem to experience sleep cycles that are similar to REM sleep in humans, according to a new study that looked at neural activity in the tiny aquatic animals.

It took a decade’s worth of work—and probably a few sleepless nights—but for the first time, researchers have identified sleep patterns in the brains of tiny zebrafish, and those patterns look remarkably similar to the brain activity in sleeping humans.

As scientists report today in the journal Nature, evidence of similar sleep patterns in both fish and mammals may offer clues about the evolution of sleep in our common ancestors, which could in turn help us better understand the biological function of nodding off.

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Some answers to the sleep questions have been eye-opening. Bendlin and her colleagues identified 98 Even with these studies in lab animals indicating that loss of sleep accelerates Alzheimer’s Slumbering stream. Flow of cerebrospinal fluid in a mouse’s brain is much higher during sleep (left

The purpose and evolutionary origins of sleep are among the biggest mysteries in neuroscience. “Everyone we talk to has an opinion about whether or not jellyfish sleep . It really forces them to “ This work provides compelling evidence for how early in evolution a sleep -like state evolved,” says Dion

“Sleep is a huge mystery in neuroscience,” says William Joiner, a biologist at the University of California, San Diego, who studies sleep in fruit flies but was not involved with this research. Plenty of work has asked why we do it, and “people really haven’t settled on a good answer.”

For the new study, the team used advanced imaging techniques to watch as zebrafish fell asleep, and they found that the tiny fish cycle between sleep states similar to what we have in humans: rapid eye movement, or REM, sleep and non-REM sleep. This pattern has been seen before in a wide range of mammals, birds, and lizards, but this is the first time it’s been spotted in a fish.

Based on our understanding of the evolutionary relationships between fish and mammals, the team suggests that REM-like sleep states evolved more than 450 million years ago, making this type of sleep a deeply held biological phenomenon.

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The findings suggest that poor sleep among older adults could be a warning sign of declining brain health, according to the researchers "We saw this inverse relationship between decreased Lucey doesn't expect sleep monitoring to replace brain scans or cerebrospinal fluid analysis for identifying

“We share a backbone, but we share much more than that,” says study coauthor Philippe Mourrain, a neuroscientist at Stanford University. “It makes it easier to understand sleep and what it does in ourselves.”

Other experts say that the methods the authors used set a new standard in studying sleep, with Joiner calling the paper a “technological tour de force.” But not everyone is convinced that it actually reveals much about sleep evolution.

“I have my doubts that you can draw a straight lineage from fish to mice and birds and reptiles and humans,” says Paul Franken, a neuroscientist at University of Lausanne in Switzerland who studies sleep in mice.

Sleeping with the fishes

Related Slideshow: 13 facts to know about sleep (Provided by Photo Services)

These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
These slumbering fish may offer clues to the origins of sleep
Scientists already knew that zebrafish could sleep simply from watching their behavior. But the gold standard to study sleep is using physiology, Franken says.

Lead author Louis C. Leung, a neuroscientist at Stanford University, built the microscope responsible for the complex imaging done for the study. Most body activity is choreographed by an intricate network of nerve cells, or neurons. When neurons are active, they release calcium, so researchers genetically engineered the zebrafish to include a protein that would flash fluorescent green when it detected calcium, indicating an area of the body is active.

Then, the real work began. The team focused on zebrafish that were just two weeks old, because the fish are transparent at this age. This allowed the researchers to observe the brain and other activity inside the body without cutting into the animal or implanting electrodes, Leung says.

They immobilized the tiny fish by plopping it in a gelatin-like substance under the microscope and then started looking at key physiological components: brain activity, heart rate, muscle activity, and eye movement.

Almost immediately, the patterns of active and nonactive neurons started to stand out, revealing the “fingerprint” of activity similar to REM and non-REM sleep cycles.

“It just about took my breath away,” Leung says.

To confirm the activity patterns were really sleep, the researchers then prevented the fish from taking “naps,” creating some very sleepy fish. When they tested the sleep-deprived fish, they found the same neuronal patterns, but more of them. In addition, when the fish were in a REM-like state, their body temperatures dropped, heart rates halved, and body muscles relaxed.

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"A chimpanzee may stretch out an open hand to another as a signal for support, whereas the same gesture toward a possessor of food signals a desire to This is so for both bonobos and chimpanzees, and suggests the vocalization is relatively invariant," Pollick continued. By studying similar types of

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Compared to the sleeping states, the awake brain in the zebrafish was very noisy, with chaotically flashing neurons, Leung says.

A sleepy common ancestor

For many organisms, environmental factors like temperature influence the duration and intensity of sleeping—humans sleep longer in cooler temperatures, for instance. Mammals have to thermoregulate, adjusting their own body temperatures to stay warm or to cool off, and thermoregulation has long been associated with sleep. But because the zebrafish sleep state is similar to ours, it suggests this type of sleep existed before the rise of thermoregulation, the team argues.

However, it’s hard to relate the results of this study to mammals, because there is so much evolutionary time between them and fish, says Jerry Siegel, a sleep scientist at University of California in Los Angeles. Sleep is almost ubiquitous among animals, he acknowledges, but it varies a lot in mammals.

“You can’t just say sleep is sleep,” he says. Just among mammals, the amount of sleep required ranges from three to 20 hours a day. REM sleep can be non-existent, as it is in many cetaceans. Or it may constitute a large portion of sleep, lasting up to 8 hours in mammals like the platypus.

In addition, the sleep signatures were found in very young fish, Seigel says, and these results don’t necessarily apply to adults. Across the animal kingdom, infants sleep differently from their parents.

The future of sleep?

Other experts are more optimistic, especially about the techniques used in the paper. The neural signatures “didn’t have to be there in fish, but he found them,” says Paul Shaw, a sleep scientist at Washington University in Saint Louis who was not part of the study. “I do think it’s surprising. It’s super cool!”

Shaw and others specifically praise the detailed imaging used to watch sleep happen on such a scale.

“Seeing is believing, and that’s what I really like about this technology,” Shaw says. “You don’t have to infer sleep [in this study].”

The advance could be particularly valuable for health professionals seeking to design new drugs to combat the growing epidemic of sleep deprivation in many countries. Better sleep-enhancing drugs could provide some relief for people who struggle to drift off. By implementing these techniques in the future, we can potentially better screen drugs to see if they activate the right cells, so that patients wake up feeling refreshed, Leung says.

“That you can see the individual neurons in a live animal, and watch how it responds to different drugs, is incredible,” Franken says. “This is a big advancement.”

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