Offbeat: Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues - PressFrom - Canada
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OffbeatArchaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues

11:41  24 august  2019
11:41  24 august  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Jerry Dias acclaimed as Unifor president for third and final term

Jerry Dias acclaimed as Unifor president for third and final term QUEBEC — Unifor says Jerry Dias has been acclaimed as national president of the union for a third and final three-year term. It says he was appointed at the union's national convention in Quebec City, where Lana Payne was chosen as secretary-treasurer. Dias, who has been a vocal critic of Opposition leader Andrew Scheer and the Conservative party, starts his new term as Canada prepares for a federal election this fall. He says in a statement that he is energized to continue to lead the union as it continues the fight for social justice.

Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1 , 000 - year - old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues . Was first discovered inside Prague Castle in 1928 by Ivan Borkovský. Nazis seized Czechoslovakia in 1939

Last year's heatwave and the record-breaking temperatures of this summer are believed to have allowed the phenomenon to occur, with the plant committing resources to blooming last year. Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1 , 000 - year - old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used

Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The man who lived during the 10th century was buried with a sword and two knives (pictured)has long been the focal point of a debate that continues to rage between academics

A skeleton from the Middle Ages that was first discovered inside Prague Castle in 1928 and then used as gruesome Nazi propaganda continues to baffle scientists.

The man who lived during the 10th century was buried with a sword and two knives has long been the focal point of a debate that rages between warring academics.

No agreement has been found among experts as to who or what the individual was, despite Hitler's government claiming the remains 'proved' the castle was Germanic.

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The new study used a high pressure water technique that simulates oil and gas generation in deep reservoirs and applied it to shale to evaluate in Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1 , 000 - year - old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as

Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1 , 000 - year - old skeleton 'For example, many of the most clinically relevant viruses around today have RNA genomes, and the RNA stage is often crucial to understanding the intricacies and complexities of gene regulation.

The skeleton made another bizarre appearance later, when the Soviets tried to pull the same trick the Nazis and claim it was of Soviet origin.

The latest analysis says it could be a Slav from a neighbouring region, 'who had mastered Old Norse as well as Slavonic' or he may have been a legitimate Viking

Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues

A new study published in the journal Antiquity looked at all previous analysis and theories to try and reach a conclusion.

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Targeted ads use data aggregated from myriad sources in order to promote products based on user preferences, and coupled with a robust audience of children, are critical to YouTube's business model. Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1 , 000 - year - old skeleton discovered in 1928 which

However, the authors failed to bring any clarity to the murky picture.

The authors could not conclude for definite the origin of the bones but were able to give some clarity to possible explanations.

They write: '[The] material culture is a mix of foreign (i.e. non-Czech) items, such as the sword, axe and 'fire striker' (a common piece of Viking equipment), and domestic objects, such as the bucket and the knives'.

They also reveal that the sword is especially unique as it is the only one discovered in 1,500 early medieval graves so far found in Prague Castle.

Related Slideshow: 16 of history's greatest unsolved mysteries (Provided by Photo Services)

Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues

It is possible, they say, that the individual was a Slav from a neighbouring region, 'who had mastered Old Norse as well as Slavonic' or he may have been a legitimate Viking.

On 11 July 1928, the remains of a male were discovered under the courtyard of Prague Castle.

A project to excavate the region led by the National Museum intended to study the earliest phases of the Castle stumbled across the skeleton for the first time.

The body was located on the edge of an old burial ground from when a hill fort was built on the site, likely dating to AD 800–950/1000.

It had a number of weapons, including a sword, located in the grave with the remains.

THE HISTORY OF THE PRAGUE CASTLE SKELETON

It was discovered by Ivan Borkovský on July 11 1982.

The true identity was unknown and the discoverer opted not to publish his findings.

It is possible he was concerned with the progress of his application for Czech citizenship.

Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues
Archaeologists remain baffled by a 1,000-year-old skeleton discovered in 1928 which was used by Nazis and the Soviet Union as propaganda - as new study offers no clues

This decision proved fateful when the Nazis invaded.

Nazis invaded Czechoslovakia in 1939 and seized Prague Castle, and the skeleton, and claimed it was German in order to further the Nazi ideology.

The nation then came under the control of the Soviets in 1945.

They tried a similar tactic with the skeleton.

His true origin is unknown, but his burial with weapons and some analysis has found he may have been a Slav from a neighbouring region, 'who had mastered Old Norse as well as Slavonic' or he may have been a legitimate Viking.

It was discovered by Ivan Borkovský, a Ukrainian who fought for both the Austro-Hungarians and the Russians in the early 20th century.

Nazi soldiers invaded Czechoslovakia in 1939 and the discoverer became embroiled in a scandal and accusations were fired at him that he conspired to conceal the skeleton's true identity.

Nazi's claimed the remains were Germanic, or maybe Viking, but certainly not Slavic.

The Nazis pushed this unfounded ideology to add credence to their claim that German heritage was a real thing which spread over established borders of space and time.

The unwitting remains became part of a larger rhetoric which claimed Prague Castle, a national landmark, belonged to Germany.

Mr Borkovský  is thought to have attempted to publish his analysis, but was threatened with imprisonment in a concentration camp if he did so.

The tale of the discoverer became almost as enthralling as the skeleton's story itself when Czechoslovakia was occupied by the Soviets and in 1945.

His anti-communist past condemned him to a Siberian gulag, but he narrowly escaped and fled the country.

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