Offbeat: Rare Ancient Tomb of Rich Minoan Woman Discovered at Monumental Archaeological Complex in Crete - PressFrom - Canada
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Offbeat Rare Ancient Tomb of Rich Minoan Woman Discovered at Monumental Archaeological Complex in Crete

17:55  09 october  2019
17:55  09 october  2019 Source:   newsweek.com

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The rare ancient tomb of a wealthy Minoan woman has been discovered at a monumental archaeological complex on the Greek island of Crete . Archaeologists say that these types of burials are rare on Crete . In fact, they are only found at the city of Chania and Knossos—the most

Archaeological excavation in eastern Crete has brought to light an intact chamber tomb from the late Minoan period. Found in the town of Ierapetra in The archaeologists stated –. A chamber tomb was discovered , dug into the soft limestone of the area. The access to the tomb was made by a vertical

a man standing on a rock: Monumental complex with central courtyard in Sissi with remnants of a Proto-Minoan settlement in the northwest. © EBSA, N. Kress Monumental complex with central courtyard in Sissi with remnants of a Proto-Minoan settlement in the northwest. The rare ancient tomb of a wealthy Minoan woman has been discovered at a monumental archaeological complex on the Greek island of Crete.

The cist grave—a small, coffin-like grave built using stone—contained an almost complete and intact skeleton of a woman, as well as a several valuable objects, according to the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports.

These objects include a bronze mirror with an ivory handle, bone and bronze garment pins, and a necklace consisting of several gold beads shaped like olives or olive pits.

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AncientPages.com - Two burials with rich grave goods were discovered in a pit of the Middle Minoan IA era (2100-2000 BC) in Siteia, NE Crete , during excavations of a palace-related cemetery, according to Tornos News. The excavations took place at the cemetery of Petras in the area of Siteia, dated to

The Minoan civilization flourished in the Middle Bronze Age on the island of Crete located in the eastern Mediterranean The archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans was first alerted to the possible presence of an ancient civilization on Crete by surviving carved seal stones worn as charms by

Archaeologists say that these types of burials are rare on Crete. In fact, they are only found at the city of Chania and Knossos—the most important ancient Minoan settlement on the island.

The fact that the woman was buried with valuable objects, suggests she was a wealthy person in life.

The find came during excavations conducted in the municipality of Sissi by the Belgian School at Athens (EBSA) in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of Lasithi. This work involved more than 100 archaeologists from around the world.

These excavations—led by Jan Driessen from the EBSA and the University of Louvain in Belgium—uncovered a large monumental complex on a hill in Sissi, which is located on the island's northern coast.

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The Minoan civilization was a Bronze Age Aegean civilization on the island of Crete and other Aegean Islands, flourishing from c. 2700 to c. 1450 BC until a late period of decline

Thousands of years before Evans discovered the first evidence of the Minoans , Crete had long been known as the subject of myth and legend. Yet it was not only in their myths that the ancient Greeks spoke of Crete . In the Odyssey, which is thought to reflect events of the Late Bronze Age, Homer

Furthermore, the archaeologists identified remains in the western part of the complex which indicated the presence of an Early Minoan settlement dating back to around 2,600 B.C.

Related slideshow: 'Cursed' tombs and discoveries through the years (Provided by Photo services)

The archaeologists say that a monumental building was constructed to the east of the settlement after the village was abandoned by its inhabitants.

This building was later destroyed by a fire in 2,500 B.C., however, its remains were subsequently incorporated almost entirely into the monumental complex, which was constructed in 1,700 B.C.

The team's excavations at the complex uncovered a floor coated with fine quality mortar and covered with dotted decorations, as well as a ceramic pipeline built to carry water from the 108-foot long courtyard towards the east slope of the complex.

The researchers also made several other notable finds, including a house which may have been destroyed between 1,700 and 1,650 B.C. by an earthquake and the previously-mentioned cist grave from the Neopalatial Period (1,750 to 1,500 B.C.)

The Minoan Civilization flourished on Crete and other islands in the Aegean Sea from around 3,000 B.C. to 1,100 B.C. It is considered by many to be the birthplace of "high culture" in Europe, bringing numerous cultural and artistic achievements.

Peaking around 1,600 B.C., the Minoan civilization was known for its great cities and architectural complexes, sophisticated artwork, its written script, and extensive trade routes which spread out across the Mediterranean.

The Minoan woman's tomb is not the only grave to be uncovered recently in Greece. In August, the Ministry of Culture and Sports announced the discovery of two ancient chamber tombs in southern Greece which date back to the Late Mycenaean Period (1,400-1,200 B.C.)

The Mycenaean culture was the first advanced civilization to develop on the Greek mainland, centered around the capital of Mycenae. The Mycenaean period spanned the years between around 1,600 and 1,100 B.C. and during this time, they developed a syllabic script which represents the earliest form of Greek.

Also in August, Russian archaeologists said they had uncovered the 1,500-year-old crypt of a warrior who was buried with his wife and children in an ancient city.

The remains were found in the eastern necropolis at Phanagoria—a coastal settlement founded by the Ancient Greeks located in what is now the Krasnodar Krai administrative region of Russia on the shores of the Black Sea.

Phangoria was founded in the mid-sixth century B.C. by Greek settlers who were largely fleeing conflict in Asia Minor—where modern-day Turkey is located. The settlement eventually developed into the most influential city in the Black Sea area and one of the largest Greek metropolises before being abandoned in the 9th and 10th centuries due to unknown reasons.

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