Offbeat: Why Do We Wear Costumes on Halloween? - - PressFrom - Canada
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Offbeat Why Do We Wear Costumes on Halloween?

14:15  22 october  2019
14:15  22 october  2019 Source:   mentalfloss.com

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Have you ever been dressed like a dolphin while asking your neighbors for free candy and wondered: why do we dress up in costumes on Halloween ?? Welcome to

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There’s no one explanation for how Halloween costumes originated. Much like the holiday itself, the practice of dressing up is the result of a hodgepodge of traditions from around the world.

Many historians suspect that the tradition has some basis in the Celtic festival of Samhain (also called Calan Gaeaf in Wales). Celebrated between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice, Samhain marks the official start of winter—known to the Celts as the “dark season.” During Samhain, “the world of the gods was believed to be made visible to humankind,” according to the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Consumers crowd the costume shops in the central region on the afternoon of Tuesday (30) in São Paulo. Demand for costumes and props for Halloween parties increase the week before halloween, celebrated on 31 October. © Cris Faga/NurPhoto via Getty Images Consumers crowd the costume shops in the central region on the afternoon of Tuesday (30) in São Paulo. Demand for costumes and props for Halloween parties increase the week before halloween, celebrated on 31 October. That wasn’t a comfort to the ancient Celts, who believed their deities were prone to playing tricks on human worshippers. Many festival participants disguised themselves as animals or beasts, hoping to hide from malevolent spirits who might bring them misfortune.

Move forward a few centuries and the modern-day practice of dressing up and trick-or-treating has its roots in the European custom of “mumming and guising.” Mummers would dress up in costumes, often woven from straw, and perform plays and songs for neighbors in exchange for food. Scottish and Irish immigrants brought that tradition to North America, where it later morphed into what we now know as trick-or-treating.

Related Slideshow: Spookily cute dogs in Halloween costumes (Provided by Photo Services)


Halloween costumes didn’t experience their true heyday until the mid-1900s, though. For that, you can thank New York City entrepreneurs Ben and Nat Cooper, who started a company producing pop culture-themed costumes at a low cost. Ben Cooper, Inc., found a niche in helping kids become the characters they admired from television and comic books, often purchasing merchandising rights before said characters ever became popular. Due in no small part to the Cooper family’s innovation, Halloween costumes became an accessible and even necessary part of holiday festivities.

Today, Halloween costumes are big business. The National Retail Federation estimates that Americans will spend about $3.2 billion on costumes this year (of that, about half a billion will go to costuming pets).

You have to wonder what the ancient Celts would have thought about today’s Halloween costumes.

Ariana Grande Is Unrecognizable in 'Twilight Zone'-Inspired Halloween Costume -- See the Pic! .
Ariana Grande knows beauty is in the 'Eye of the Beholder.'If it wasn't for her signature high pony, the "Don't Call Me Angel" singer would be completely unrecognizable in her Halloween costume this year. Grande, a big Twilight Zone fan, channeled the show's 1959 episode, "Eye of the Beholder," which provides commentary on what is -- and isn't -- deemed beautiful by conventional standards.

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