Offbeat: Swedish Divers Just Discovered Two Shipwrecks That Might Be Related to the Famous Vasa Warship - - PressFrom - Canada
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Offbeat Swedish Divers Just Discovered Two Shipwrecks That Might Be Related to the Famous Vasa Warship

06:00  13 november  2019
06:00  13 november  2019 Source:   mentalfloss.com

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Now, the Guardian reports Swedish maritime archaeologists from Vrak—Museum of Wrecks have located two shipwrecks in the Swedish archipelago outside of Vaxholm They believe the first wreck they discovered may be the Äpplet, and the second wreck could be either the Kronan or the Scepter.

Now, two newly discovered wrecks from the same era may be the remains of the warships that “We have learned so much from the Vasa , not just about Swedish warships but about European As a sister to the Vasa Museum, it seems only fitting that the museum’s dive program may have turned

a large building© Christian Lundh, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

In 1625, King Gustavus II Adolphus of Sweden commissioned shipbuilders to create the most beautiful, lethal flagship that ever existed, as a symbol of Sweden’s naval strength. Three years later, crowds gathered to watch the Vasa, named after Sweden’s royal house, set sail for the first time. But less than a mile into its maiden voyage, the poorly and hastily constructed warship sunk to the bottom of the Baltic Sea, where it remained until 1961 when it was salvaged and later transported to the Vasa Museum.

Now, the Guardian reports Swedish maritime archaeologists from Vrak—Museum of Wrecks have located two shipwrecks in the Swedish archipelago outside of Vaxholm that could be linked to the Vasa. This is because the shipwright responsible for the Vasa built three other ships, the Äpplet, the Kronan, and the Scepter (though, unlike their ill-fated sibling, they actually made it into battle).

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Swedish maritime archeologists have discovered two wrecks believed to be 17th century At least one of the ships is believed to be the sister ship Sweden 's most famous warship the The divers took wood samples of the ships which will be sent to a laboratory for dating. Despite being centuries old, the wrecks -- just like the Vasa -- are in fairly good condition, thanks to the brackish waters of the

Two wrecks discovered may be sister ships of Vasa , which sank on its maiden voyage. Swedish maritime archaeologists have discovered two wrecks believed to be 17th-century warships , at The divers took samples of wood samples from the latest wrecks to be discovered , which will be sent to

“It was like swimming around the Vasa ship,” maritime archaeologist Jim Hansson said in a museum press release. They believe the first wreck they discovered may be the Äpplet, and the second wreck could be either the Kronan or the Scepter.

“We think that some of them were sunk in the area,” Patrik Hoglund, another Vrak archaeologist, told the Guardian. But these ships didn’t capsize because of shoddy engineering or even an enemy attack. Instead, experts believe the Swedish navy intentionally sunk them after they were decommissioned, so their wrecks would function as surprise spike strips to damage approaching enemy ships.

The divers brought back wood samples from the wrecks to send to a laboratory for testing. Once they know when and where the timber came from, they can cross-reference the data with Swedish archives to find out if it matches information from the Vasa.

Even if the warships do turn out to be the Vasa’s long-lost siblings, it’s unlikely that they’ll be salvaged and displayed alongside it, since the Baltic Sea’s brackish waters actually preserve them much better than a museum could.

Sweden isn’t the only nation that boasts a beautiful shipwreck or two—here are 10 other shipwrecks around the world that you can visit.

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