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Offbeat Cat That Went Missing In Portland, Oregon Shows Up in Santa Fe, New Mexico—Five Years Later

12:07  26 november  2019
12:07  26 november  2019 Source:   mentalfloss.com

This Is Why Santa Says "Ho, Ho, Ho"

  This Is Why Santa Says Want to know why Santa says "ho, ho, ho"? We dug into the catchphrase's origins to find an answer—just in time for the jolly holiday season.The truth is simple: The catchphrase is "used to represent laughter," according to Merriam-Webster. So, when Santa utters "ho, ho, ho," he isn't actually saying anything—he's laughing! Now, you might be asking yourself why Santa doesn't simply say "ha, ha, ha" if he's having a chuckle. Well, the answer lies in his figure. One of Santa's most iconic features is his round belly—and when a person says "ho, ho, ho," the sound is considered to come from the stomach.

According to the Santa Fe Animal Shelter, the former shelter animal miraculously looks like he “hasn’t missed a meal.” A few weeks ago, 31-year-old medical student Viktor Usov answered a call from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter claiming to have found his cat , Sasha, who had wandered off five years

Usov, who lives in Portland , Oregon , first thought it was surely a different cat . Sasha might be more adventurous than most house cats , but he’s far from the only one who has turned up years later and miles away—find out the incredible lost-and-found stories of Alfie, Crockett, and seven other cats here.

A few weeks ago, 31-year-old medical student Viktor Usov answered a call from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter claiming to have found his cat, Sasha, who had wandered off five years ago—and 1300 miles away from New Mexico. Usov, who lives in Portland, Oregon, first thought it was surely a different cat. But his name was listed on the microchip, and the shelter workers described a black, long-haired, friendly feline that sounded exactly like Sasha.

a black and yellow cat with its mouth open© Oleksandr Shchus/iStock via Getty Images

According to OregonLive.com, after Usov adopted the cat from the Oregon Humane Society six years ago, his tender loving care (and his mother’s acupuncture treatments) helped cure Sasha’s distended stomach and chronically runny nose. Sasha soon became affable and spirited, even forming a friendship with Usov’s labradoodle puppy, Tara.

Move Over Dogs, Goats, and Peacocks: Llamas Are the Hot New Therapy Animal

  Move Over Dogs, Goats, and Peacocks: Llamas Are the Hot New Therapy Animal Therapy llamas are spreading holiday cheer, alleviating stress, and lowering blood pressure from Oregon to Texas and beyond.The Washington Postreports that the friendly, festively dressed llamas belong to Mountain Peaks Therapy Llamas and Alpacas, which usually brings them to hospitals, rehabilitation centers, senior communities, hospice care, special-needs organizations, and even schools. According to the organization’s website, the visits help “alleviate loneliness, lower blood pressure, and reduce stress.

1. fewer cats are ending up in shelters these days. A few weeks ago, 31-year-old medical student Viktor Usov answered a call from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter claiming to have found his cat , Sasha, who had wandered off five years ago—and 1300 miles away from New Mexico .

Usov, who lives in Portland , Oregon , first thought it was surely a different cat . But his name was listed on the microchip, and the Sasha might be more adventurous than most house cats , but he’s far from the only one who has turned up years later and miles away—find out the incredible lost-and-found

A year later, when Sasha disappeared during a walk, Usov assumed the worst.

“We waited a week or so, but when we didn’t get a call from the Humane Society and no one returned him, we figured a coyote got him,” Usov told OregonLive.com. “We were upset but we moved on.”

Not only did Sasha evade every coyote from Portland to Santa Fe, he also somehow managed to stay well-fed and healthy during his epic journey south.

“How [he] managed to survive to get here is the million-dollar question,” Santa Fe Animal Shelter spokesperson Murad Kirdar told the Santa Fe Reporter. “I can tell you [he] hasn’t missed a meal.”

While Kirdar thinks Sasha might have hitched rides on U-Hauls, trains, and/or cars, Usov imagines that his beloved pet embarked on a spectacular sightseeing tour of the West.

“He went on a grand American adventure,” he told KGW. “He stopped by the Grand Canyon, Crater Lake; he saw the monuments, all the national parks, definitely Redwood Forest.”

Sasha might be more adventurous than most house cats, but he’s far from the only one who has turned up years later and miles away—find out the incredible lost-and-found stories of Alfie, Crockett, and seven other cats here.


Toronto woman mourns zombie Santa, who was stolen amid neighbourhood feud .
A Toronto woman is embracing the absurdity of the holiday season after a spat over her zombie Santa lawn ornament ended with the shambling corpse of Saint Nick being stolen from her front yard over the weekend. Riverdale resident Nikolina Nikolova — who is actually named after Saint Nicholas — told CBC News that she can't stop laughing about the situation, in what might be one of the most ridiculous cases of NIMBYism the city has ever seen. "I think zombie Santa has lived up to the legend he was supposed to be," Nikolova said. "He had a jolly ending … There is no hard feelings.

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