Offbeat: A royal facial deformity is linked to inbreeding - - PressFrom - Canada
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Offbeat A royal facial deformity is linked to inbreeding

15:10  02 december  2019
15:10  02 december  2019 Source:   inews.co.uk

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A facial deformity prominent among the Habsburg dynasty of Spanish and Austrian kings and their wives can be attributed to inbreeding , researchers have This new study, published in the Annals of Human Biology, proves the long-suspected condition was linked to inbreeding as a result of

The new study combined diagnosis of facial deformities using historical portraits with genetic analysis of the degree of relatedness to determine whether there was a direct link . The causes of the relationship between inbreeding and facial deformity remain unclear, but the authors suggest it's

Portrait of Charles II of Spain, 1680-1683. Found in the collection of the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, Barcelona. (Photo by Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images) Portrait of Charles II of Spain, 1680-1683. Found in the collection of the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, Barcelona. (Photo by Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images) A facial deformity prominent among the Habsburg dynasty of Spanish and Austrian kings and their wives can be attributed to inbreeding, researchers have confirmed.

The 'Habsburg jaw' caused the lower jaw to protrude significantly above the upper jaw, resulting in a distinct chin clearly visible in historical portraits of the family's members.

This new study, published in the Annals of Human Biology, proves the long-suspected condition was linked to inbreeding as a result of generations of intermarriage.

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THE jutting 'Habsburg jaw' - a facial deformity common to the European royal family of the same name - was the results of centuries of inbreeding , according to a new study. Generations of intermarriage secured the Habsburg dynasty's dominance over a vast European empire

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It asked 10 maxillofacial surgeons (specialised in surgery of the face, mouth and jaw) to diagnose facial deformity in 66 portraits of 15 members of the Habsburg dynasty, examining 11 features of mandibular prognathism (protrusion of the lower jaw) and seven maxillary deficiency (upper jaw area) features - including a prominent lower lip and overhanging nasal tip.

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Centuries of inbreeding is to blame to a facial deformity prevalent among European royals known as “Habsburg jaw”, scientists have said. The condition led the lower jaw to protrude significantly and affected the Habsburg dynasty of Spanish and Austrian kings and their wives, who secured their

Two hundred years of inbreeding among European royals may be to blame for a facial deformity known as the 'Habsburg jaw', scientists claim. Geneticists and surgeons analysed the deformities visible in various portraits of the dynasty and compared this with the amount of inbreeding across

  A royal facial deformity is linked to inbreeding © Provided by The i

The House of Habsburg held the throne of the Holy Roman Empire from 1438 until 1740, when the final male monarch King Charles II of Spain died after failing to produce a male heir.

The surgeons determined that Mary of Burgundy, who married into the family in 1477, showed the least degree of both traits, while  Philip IV, King of Spain and Portugal from 1621 to 1640, displayed the greatest amount of mandibular prognathism.

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The cause of the relationship between the inbreeding and facial deformity remain unclear, but the study authors suggest it's because mating between relatives increases the chance of offspring inheriting identical forms of a gene from both parents. This reduces someone's genetic fitness - meaning the

A royal family's signature facial deformity was almost certainly thanks to their rampant inbreeding , scientists say. The Habsburg dynasty ruled The most distinctive feature of Charles' misshapen appearance was his prominent jaw, a combination of two deformities - maxillary deficiency and

Correlation between the conditions

Maximilian I (regent from 1493), his daughter Margaret of Austria, his nephew Charles I of Spain, Charles' great-grandson Philip IV and Charles II were found to have the greatest degree of maxillary deficiency.

Maximilian I', (1933). Portrait of Maximilian I (1459-1519), Holy Roman Emperor and King of Germany. Maximilian I', (1933). Portrait of Maximilian I (1459-1519), Holy Roman Emperor and King of Germany.

The researchers detected a correlation between the two conditions, suggesting they share a common genetic trait basis. They also identified a strong relationship between the degree of inbreeding and the degree of mandibular prognathism.

While the relationship to maxillary deficiency was also positive, it was only statistically significant in two of the seven features diagnosed.

"The Habsburg dynasty was one of the most influential in Europe, but became renowned for inbreeding, which was its eventual downfall. We show for the first time that there is a clear positive relationship between inbreeding and appearance of the Habsburg jaw," said lead researcher Professor Roman Vilas from the University of Santiago de Compostela.

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