Sports: Bruce Arthur: Toronto responds like a champion when celebration turns to chaos - PressFrom - Canada
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SportsBruce Arthur: Toronto responds like a champion when celebration turns to chaos

03:30  18 june  2019
03:30  18 june  2019 Source:   thestar.com

Bruce Arthur: NBA’s hands-off policy rightly puts Warriors shareholder in his place for contact with Kyle Lowry

Bruce Arthur: NBA’s hands-off policy rightly puts Warriors shareholder in his place for contact with Kyle Lowry OAKLAND, CALIF.—Kyle Lowry could have lost control, but he didn’t. The Toronto Raptors point guard had just sold out to chase a ball into the stands, flying with the emotional abandon that Lowry has to live by to survive. Lowry didn’t know the man in the front row who had shoved him and was telling him to go f-- himself was a billionaire minority owner of the Golden State Warriors. All Lowry knew was that someone had put their hands on him, and that, furious, he had to keep from doing the same. Some moments feel even bigger than they are, and a day later, that flashpoint was just one of the fires burning in what might be Golden State’s crumbling empire.

Chaos will give birth to a dancing star (a triumphant once). Necessity is the mother of invention. When we are dearth, we create and we innovate. Social convention and morality policing, in his opinion, sapped out the beautiful chaos in one’s soul and leaves them slave to the hive mind.

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Bruce Arthur: Toronto responds like a champion when celebration turns to chaos© Rick Madonik A chaotic scene during Monday’s Raptors rally at Nathan Phillips Square turned celebration to tears for some rally-goers.

It was already a bit of a mess. There were so many people. The concrete City Hall arches weren’t secured, and some brave idiots clambered up and danced on top, with no fear of falling. The video and audio on the big screens in and around Nathan Phillips Square didn’t work, so people stood shoulder to shoulder and baked in the sun and cheered other occasional dangerous climbing stunts, or fireworks, or purple and red flares. There wasn’t enough water, and some people passed out and had to be dragged from the square. Cops couldn’t get in; people had trouble getting out. God, they were patient in there.

Bruce Arthur: Raptors break the damaged Warriors to move to within one game of NBA title

Bruce Arthur: Raptors break the damaged Warriors to move to within one game of NBA title OAKLAND, CALIF. — The Golden State Warriors were desperate. They had unwrapped their injured, the ones they could; they came out with the fire of a champion. The Toronto Raptors had forced them into the deepest place, where the Warriors haven’t always had to go, in the last few years. They always had answers before, talent, nuclear missiles ready to launch. They didn’t often have to dig all the way to the bottom. Well, the Raptors have pushed them there, and they are the ones with more answers, now. On a night where the shots weren’t falling, the Raptors reached an apex in Game 4, winning in Oakland by a score of 105-92.

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Chaos originally referred to the unordered state of matter in classical accounts of cosmogony. It has since come to mean any state of disorder, or any confused or amorphous mixture or conglomeration. What do we have left once we abandon the lie? Chaos .A gaping pit waiting to swallow us all. Chaos

Across town, the Toronto Raptors parade buses were sent down a route with no barriers, as narrow as a Tour de France ascent through a madding crowd. By the time they reached City Hall, they were three hours late. They used to joke in this town — in other towns, more, making fun of the Leafs — Plan The Parade. Turns out it can be harder than it looks.

And then came the Raptors, the conquering heroes, a reward. The politicians showed up too, and Doug Ford was given the righteously vicious booing he deserved. The crowd roared for their guys, for the champs. So many people were there, full of collective joy and purpose. A group combined to lift people out of the crowd on the east side, onto a ramp: children, people in distress, two people in wheelchairs. They lifted them above their heads and the hot, bored crowd cheered them afterwards. Despite everything, it could be a wonderful day.

Bruce Arthur: Raptors build momentum one defining moment at a time

Bruce Arthur: Raptors build momentum one defining moment at a time The second Toronto Raptors game I ever covered was in Detroit at the old Palace of Auburn Hills, a madhouse, the deciding Game 5 of the first round in 2002. Toronto was down three, but Toronto’s Chris Childs forgot the score. He thought it was four. His hurried, off-balance three-pointer missed, and Keon Clark smoked a cigarette in the shower. You couldn’t forget it. It was the night Childs lost his place in the plot, and for a long time the Raptors never seemed to truly find it. Until now. Stay in the moment: That was what Kawhi Leonard preached every step along the way as the Raptors marched to the precipice of a title, no matter the situation. Stay in the moment.

Offering his insights to SportsCentre, Arthur also contributes regularly to TSN Radio stations. Every Champion needs a Challenger. WATCH NOW. Named Canada’s best sports writer in 2012 by Sports Media Canada, the Toronto Star’s Bruce Arthur is one of Canada’s most respected sports

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Owner Larry Tanenbaum was talking when the people started running. When a crowd runs it lurches like an animal, desperate, and they lurched from the southeast corner of the square. Some tried to run up to the concrete catwalk where the media were working, and were stopped by police and security. The panic spread. Someone was down. “Four shots,” said a witness.

“Every possession, every basket, every steal, every block … They never gave up. Because our Raptors never give up,” said Tanenbaum, in what must have been one of the great moment of his successful and illustrious life. “The Raptors united an entire country with 50 Jurassic Parks. Nobody has ever done that before.”

In the crowd people yelled “Gun, gun, he’s got a gun” and ran. On the southwest corner, lawyer Michael Paris was in the crowd. People were hot and testy, and suddenly he heard a rumble and people screaming and falling and he was pushed back, like he was up to his shoulders in a wave. He repeated fire drills in his head: stay calm.

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Jordan Bernt Peterson (born June 12, 1962) is a Canadian clinical psychologist and a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto .

“I’m thinking, it could be fireworks,” Paris said. “Some people were saying the wood platform planks collapsed over the fountain. But you also think (about the Toronto van attack of 2018).

He said, “And I shamefully tried to shield my face or get behind someone in case it’s bullets.”

It wasn’t shameful. Paris realized he didn’t have his wallet and keys, because they were in his bag and he’d been separated from the bag in the wave. He looked, and a man was holding it up. The man’s name was Nicholas. He had picked up two other bags and was looking for their owners, too.

On the catwalk, police officers yelled “Get down” on the catwalk and the TV people and the Raptors staffers and a lot of kids — a surprising number of kids — got down. A police officer ran and yelled “Medic” to the three paramedics standing by the corner. He sent them down the stairs.

On the stage, the speeches continued. Matt Devlin, Toronto’s play-by-play man and rally emcee, heard through the earpiece that there was an emergency. He was told: Cut Larry off, talk to the crowd, tell them there’s a situation. Keep it cool.

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@ekoreen @ bruce _ arthur @WolstatSun @wojespn @JalenRose @MichelleDBeadle @SarahSpain just donated to Kevin Durant Foundation as an apology for Toronto fans, we are better than that and hope you guys can share so we get more donations.

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“I was so focused in on the moment of just trying to make sure everybody stayed calm,” Devlin told the Star. “I think there was a question of what is going on. When you’re up there, you’re trying to speak from the heart and make sure the situation doesn’t escalate. At that point, I’m not thinking of anything other than, you want to convey a message (that) will keep the situation as calm as possible.”

Devlin kept people calm. Devlin did a hell of a job.

The cops were still yelling “Get down” and more people were running. On James St. a block to the east; out of 483 Bay, right there; then out of the Eaton Centre, a block east down Albert St. Police officers, of course, ran in.

On the stage, Nick Nurse was hoarse. The crowd had chanted “box and one” earlier, in reference to the gimmicky, grade-school defence the Raptors coach had successful hauled out in the NBA Finals, of all places. He yelled, “Bono said: ‘The world needs more Canada.’ The world just got it.”

Justin Trudeau was still on the stage; Ford was still on the stage; the mayor was still on the stage. There was yellow crime tape at Queen and Bay. The cops might have recovered the two firearms by then, or taken the three people into custody, and maybe the paramedics were trying to help the injured by then. Maybe that happened later. It happened, though.

There are too many guns in this city. There are so many good people, too, who help each other out, always. On Monday so many people together were patient, worked together, stood shoulder to shoulder, helped each other out. That’s Toronto. Champs.

With files from Dave Feschuk

Bruce Arthur is a Toronto-based sports columnist. Follow him on Twitter: @bruce_arthur

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Masai Ujiri looked so happy. He has spoken before about how much he loves Toronto, about his belief in the Raptors, about his ambition and his passions and his staff. He has spoken from the heart before, and it’s not the first time he has shown why people believe in him. Ujiri is a one-of-a-kind basketball executive. We knew that already. But now the president of the Toronto Raptors is a champion, and it has made all the difference. Ujiri finally held his season-ending media conference after his masterpiece season and you could see how proud he was, how powerfully he felt it. He let his ambition and his heart show.

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