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SportsMariano Rivera looks back on teaching Roy Halladay his legendary cutter

02:20  21 july  2019
02:20  21 july  2019 Source:   sportsnet.ca

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Mariano Rivera joins MLB Tonight to discuss teaching Roy Halladay the grip for his cut fastball during the 2008 All-Star Game.

Mariano Rivera , the career saves leader whose elegant efficiency helped the Yankees win five World Series, on Tuesday became the first player ever elected unanimously to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Two other right-handed pitchers, Roy Halladay and Mike Mussina, also were elected, Halladay on his first

Mariano Rivera looks back on teaching Roy Halladay his legendary cutter© Provided by Rogers Media Inc Halladay2

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. – In the bottom right-hand corner of the glass display housing some Roy Halladay artifacts in the Hall of Fame, there’s a baseball with the blue-pen tracelines of two fingers cutting diagonally across the horseshoe part of the seams.

It’s a memento from the 2008 All-Star Game, but the significance is in its backstory. During an outfield conversation before the Midsummer Classic, Halladay asked Mariano Rivera how he threw his legendary cutter. The New York Yankees closer gladly obliged, sharing with the Toronto Blue Jays ace the secret behind his bat-shredding weapon.

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Rivera famously gave the late Blue Jays and Phillies ace a baseball while explaining his cutter back in 2008.

Rivera threw his final pitch in 2013, and now he is on top of the pile: the only Hall of Famer ever elected unanimously by the baseball writers. Rivera — the second Hall of Famer from Panama, after Rod Carew — did not throw his signature cutter when the Yankees signed him for ,500 in 1990.

Mariano Rivera looks back on teaching Roy Halladay his legendary cutter© Provided by Rogers Media Inc

Eleven years later, Rivera recounted the exchange Saturday in Cooperstown ahead of Sunday’s induction ceremonies for the two pitching giants as part of the Baseball Hall of Fame’s Class of 2019. Although the Hall’s placard says Rivera traced his fingers on the ball for Halladay, Rivera remembers it differently, saying, “I didn’t trace it. He did that.”

But the rest of the story, complete with Derek Jeter and the rest of the Yankees fining Rivera in Kangaroo Court for helping an ace opponent, is on the money.

“When you have all-star games, you always chit-chat with the guys, exchanging success (stories), just talking,” said Rivera. “I was talking with Halladay and he asked me how I throw the cutter and I taught him. He did good and my guys got mad at me because I taught him. But it’s all right. That’s part of me.”

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Mariano Rivera could become the first unanimous National Baseball Hall of Fame inductee. The late Roy Halladay deserves to join him in next year's class. The Class of ’19 looks like Rivera , Martinez and Halladay , with Mussina possibly joining them, especially because Halladay ’s candidacy should

Mariano Rivera looks back on teaching Roy Halladay his legendary cutter© Provided by Rogers Media Inc

Their conversation is reflective of both men, Halladay always seeking ways to improve, even as he was dominating the majors, Rivera always generous, even it meant helping an opponent.

The latter belies the competitiveness of baseball’s all-time saves leader, whose ruthlessness in closing out opponents on the mound stood in such stark contrast to his joy in helping others when off it.

“I’ll tell you what, I’m going to put it like this: If I was going to charge the guys that I gave advice, I would have made a lot more money. That’s how many players, hitters and pitchers, I spoke to and I gave them advice,” he said of the dichotomy between trying to both help and defeat rivals. “It’s a part of me. I always want people to do good and to have success. If I had to do something for them to be successful, I would do it.”

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