Sports: Allegations of Astros’ sign-stealing raise key questions for MLB - - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

Sports Allegations of Astros’ sign-stealing raise key questions for MLB

16:50  13 november  2019
16:50  13 november  2019 Source:   sportsnet.ca

Cole hints at Astros exit: It was a pleasure to play in Houston

  Cole hints at Astros exit: It was a pleasure to play in Houston Houston Astros right-hander Gerrit Cole didn't seem enthusiastic about speaking with the media after his club lost Game 7 of the World Series on Wednesday. "I'm not an employee of the team," Cole said to an Astros spokesperson, according to Hunter Atkins of the Houston Chronicle. "I guess as a representative of myself " Cole continued, and then he addressed reporters. The 29-year-old is hitting free agency and is poised to earn a massive contract wherever he signs.A client of agent Scott Boras, Cole's apparel during his media availability hinted that he is looking to cash in.(Video courtesy: MLB.

Sign - stealing is, of course, a time-honoured tradition in baseball but anything done outside the field of play is considered verboten. Technological advancements have made it easier and easier to skirt the rules — in 2017, MLB fined the Boston Red Sox for using smartwatches to steal signs against the

A bombshell report about sign stealing was released Tuesday. Pitch tipping vs. sign stealing . Let's not get our signals crossed here. There's a big difference between Of note is that while MLB was investigating sign stealing during 2017, the rules weren't specifically firmed up until before last season.

a close up of a man throwing a baseball: Astros© Provided by Rogers Media Inc Astros

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — In the summer of 2011, ESPN The Magazine ran a story detailing a convoluted sign-stealing plot allegedly hatched by the Toronto Blue Jays involving the now-infamous ‘Man in White’ parked in centre field.

The sources cited were four unnamed relievers from an undisclosed team who reported seeing a gentleman seated in Rogers Centre stands relaying the signals in to hitters during games. For a while the tale lingered, even though no one made a direct accusation to the Blue Jays and no team filed a formal complaint with the commissioner’s office.

“This is bogus. This is fictitious. This is made up,” Jose Bautista told me at the time.

Astros owner: 'We're going to take a run' at re-signing Cole

  Astros owner: 'We're going to take a run' at re-signing Cole Don't rule out the Houston Astros in the upcoming Gerrit Cole sweepstakes. Owner Jim Crane said Monday that the Astros want to bring the free-agent ace back, but it should be a challenge. "We’re going to take a run at it," Crane said, according to Brian McTaggart of MLB.com. "We don't know if we can get to where they want to get. (Agent Scott) Boras is tough to deal with." Crane added that the Astros could exceed the luxury tax threshold in 2020.Houston did offer Cole a $17.8 million qualifying offer on Monday. However, it's a near certainty the AL Cy Young finalist will reject it as he's likely to receive a contract in free agency in excess of $200 million.

MLB clears Astros of sign - stealing allegations ; Dave Dombrowski defends Red Sox. "With respect to both incidents regarding a Houston Astros employee, security identified an issue, addressed it and turned the matter over to the Department of Investigations.

Remember, there were allegations against the Astros this postseason about whistling when an off-speed MLB is investigating Taubman, and the league could expand that inquiry into the franchise's sign Expect the issue of high-tech sign stealing to be a key point of discussion this offseason for

The same cannot be said of the electronic sign-stealing by the Houston Astros during the 2017 season exposed in remarkable detail by Ken Rosenthal and Evan Drellich of The Athletic.

Former Astros starter Mike Fiers spoke about the club’s system on the record while three other members of the ’17 team discussed it privately, detailing how a video-camera feed from centre field was connected to a monitor in the tunnel leading to the dugout, and breaking balls were identified with a loud bang on a trash can.

An example was subsequently identified and posted to Twitter by Jomboy Media.

“That’s not playing the game the right way,” Fiers told The Athletic.

Report: Astros stole signs electronically in 2017

  Report: Astros stole signs electronically in 2017 Warning: Video contains coarse language The Houston Astros stole signs during home games at Minute Maid Park during the 2017 season, reports The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal and Evan Drellich. Four people who were with the Astros in 2017, including pitcher Mike Fiers, confirmed to Rosenthal and Drellich that the Astros were stealing signs in real time with the aid of a camera in the outfield. MLB is already investigating the Astros' cultureThe Houston Astros stole signs during home games at Minute Maid Park during the 2017 season, reports The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal and Evan Drellich.

# Astros GM Jeff Luhnow on allegations of his club stealing signs using technology: "I think what happens " Sign - stealing is not an uncommon practice and there in fact is not a rule against it," MLB Commissioner Trading for MLB 's best shortstop could finally give LA their key to a World Series.

MLB must address sign - stealing scandal after report on Astros ’ video espionage. Former Astros pitcher Mike Fiers confirmed the existence of a sign - stealing system in Major League Baseball rules prohibit the use of cameras or other electronic equipment for the purpose of stealing signs.

Major League Baseball, already investigating the Astros over their handling of former assistant GM Brandon Taubman’s deplorable behaviour toward a group of female reporters during the post-season, is now probing the sign stealing, too.

The Astros released a statement and this time did not throw gasoline directly into a fire.

“Regarding the story posted by The Athletic earlier today, the Houston Astros organization has begun an investigation in co-operation with Major League Baseball. It would not be appropriate to comment further on this matter at this time,” it read.

Sign-stealing is, of course, a time-honoured tradition in baseball but anything done outside the field of play is considered verboten. Technological advancements have made it easier and easier to skirt the rules — in 2017, MLB fined the Boston Red Sox for using smartwatches to steal signs against the New York Yankees.

MLB needs to step up on cheating allegations against Astros: 'It's a serious matter'

  MLB needs to step up on cheating allegations against Astros: 'It's a serious matter' Veteran righty Mike Fiers said that the Astros were stealing signs using electronic means during the 2017 season, another blemish for the organization.Oh, not that whistleblower.

Major League Baseball and the Astros announced after Fiers' allegations that they would immediately launch an investigation on whether The Astros ’ reputation for illegally stealing signs was rampant enough that Nationals GM Mike Rizzo said Tuesday at the General Manager Meetings

The Astros were accused of stealing signs during Game 1 of the ALCS when an Astros employee was seen with a video camera aimed Boston Red Sox new Chief Baseball Officer Chaim Bloom is a busy man this offseason and promises to get busier as key decisions about the team's direction await.

Last year, the Astros were accused of planting an employee to point a camera into the Red Sox dugout during the American League Championship Series, while this year, the Yankees claimed the Astros used whistles to identify pitches.

Paranoia about sign-stealing has been attributed to the spike in mound visits that led to the implementation of limits on catcher trips to the pitcher. MLB strengthened its rules around sign stealing prior to this season, but suspicion lingers.

“There’ve been times because of all the talk in and around it where we’ve wondered and asked questions,” said Blue Jays GM Ross Atkins. “But it’s never been something where we’ve opened up an investigation.”

One coach said the Astros “aren’t even close to only team doing this,” and the latest revelations may provide some sort of tipping point on more substantial action by MLB to try and clean things up, even if Atkins said, “I don’t think it’s throughout the game and rampant.”

“All that we can do is think about ways to put our players in the best positions to have success,” said Atkins. “When it comes up, we talk about ways to understand if there’s opportunities for us to be thinking about preventing something, or thinking about making sure that we’re prepared from just creating as much distraction as possible. … It’s something we spend some time on, but we spend the bulk of our time thinking about how we can make the best pitches and how we can execute best on the base paths and as hitters and as defenders.”

Sure, but in all the ways technology and modern business practices have changed the game for the better, the use of video and other tools in sign-stealing is changing the game for the worse.

Back in 2011, when the ‘Man in White’ allegations emerged about the Blue Jays, Ozzie Guillen, then managing the White Sox, said, “If they’re stealing signs, you got a dumb catcher.”

It’s not that simple any more. Teams can now use detailed Edgertronic video to overlay a pitcher’s delivery when throwing fastballs against breaking balls to try and identify a small tell, or find any subtle variance that can be used to a hitter’s advantage.

Whether such actions are crossing a line is an important question, one of many Major League Baseball is facing now that the most outlandish of sign-stealing schemes has gone from ridiculous to reality.

Fired Astros scouts providing information to MLB about cheating? .
The Houston Astros' reliance on analytics and data has resulted in a culling of their scouting department over the last decade, and their reportedly cavalier way of treating former scouts may have resulted in the emergence of the recent sign-stealing scandal now rocking MLB.Since then, more evidence of the alleged cheating has been published, including an email that reportedly directed scouts to potentially use cameras to steal signs.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!