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Sports Hinch 'deeply sorry' for role in Astros' sign-stealing scandal

14:55  14 january  2020
14:55  14 january  2020 Source:   thescore.com

Report: Beltran steps down from Mets amid sign-stealing scandal

  Report: Beltran steps down from Mets amid sign-stealing scandal Carlos Beltran has decided to step down as manager of the New York Mets following the revelation of his role in the Houston Astros' 2017 sign-stealing scandal, according to The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal. Beltran was the only player named in MLB's investigation. The report led to the suspensions and eventual firings of Houston manager AJ Hinch and general manager Jeff Luhnow. Beltran is the third manager out of a job this week due to the investigation. Along with Hinch, Alex Cora and the Boston Red Sox mutually decided to part ways on Tuesday.The 42-year-old Beltran was hired by the Mets in November and never managed a game.

Former Houston Astros manager AJ Hinch acknowledged his role in the sign - stealing scandal that ultimately cost him his job on Monday. "While the evidence consistently showed I didn't endorse or participate in the sign - stealing practices, I failed to stop them and I am deeply sorry .

A sign - stealing scandal could land the final blow. Tim BrownMLB columnist. On Tuesday, the conclusion was to investigate a report the Astros had stolen signs by way of a complex video In the wake of another reason to wonder about the Astros ’ methods and the people who inspire those

a man wearing a baseball hat© Patrick Smith / Getty Images Sport / Getty

Former Houston Astros manager AJ Hinch acknowledged his role in the sign-stealing scandal that ultimately cost him his job on Monday.

Hours after he was fired by Astros owner Jim Crane - on the heels of being issued a one-year suspension by commissioner Rob Manfred - Hinch said he accepted the punishments handed to him.

"As a leader and major-league manager, it is my responsibility to lead players and staff with integrity that represents the game in the best possible way," Hinch said in a statement obtained by Chandler Rome of the Houston Chronicle. "While the evidence consistently showed I didn't endorse or participate in the sign-stealing practices, I failed to stop them and I am deeply sorry.

Astros' Crane says scandal doesn't taint 2017 World Series win

  Astros' Crane says scandal doesn't taint 2017 World Series win Houston Astros owner Jim Crane doesn't think the sign-stealing scandal rocking his franchise has delegitimized the club's 2017 World Series victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers. “I don’t think it taints (the title)” Jim Crane said. #Astros pic.twitter.com/BYiokxFHVk — Jose de Jesus Ortiz (@OrtizKicks) January 13, 2020 Crane explained the team had been competitive for a number of years prior to 2017, and that the scandal does not define Houston's“I don’t think it taints (the title)” Jim Crane said. #Astrospic.twitter.

The Houston Astros fired manager A.J. Hinch and general manager Jeff Lunhow for their roles in the sign - stealing scandal during the 2017 season in which they won While the evidence consistently showed I didn’t participate in the sign stealing practices, I failed to stop them and I am deeply sorry .

Mets' carlos beltran avoids punishment for role in astros sign - stealing scandal despite key role . Others then responded. The Astros fired Hinch and Luhnow soon after MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred ruled that each man would be suspended for a year for their

"I apologize to Mr. Crane for all negative reflections this may have had on him and the Astros organization ... I apologize to all of you (the fans) for our mistakes but I'm confident we will learn from it - and I personally commit to work tirelessly to ensure I do."

Manfred's investigation of the 2017 season found it was the team's then-bench coach Alex Cora, not Hinch, who developed the sign-sealing scheme. A video monitor was set up just beyond the dugout with a camera in center field; someone in the dugout would then hit a trash can to tip Astros hitters on what pitch was coming.

But while Hinch did not create the scheme, he also did not stop it. The 45-year-old told Manfred he smashed the video monitors on two separate occasions, but did not tell Cora or his players to stop what they were doing. Manfred wrote in his report that Hinch's inaction was enough to warrant the one-year suspension from baseball.

Hinch compiled a 481-329 record in five seasons managing the Astros. His teams reached the playoffs in four of those five years, won 100 games three times, and took home a pair of AL pennants plus the 2017 World Series championship.

Both Hinch and former Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow were banned from baseball for one year and fired by the team. Luhnow issued his own statement on Monday in which he denied his personal involvement in the scheme and said he is "not a cheater."

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Mendoza: Fiers going public about sign stealing 'didn't sit well with me' .
Sunday Night Baseball analyst Jessica Mendoza criticized former Astros pitcher Mike Fiers for speaking publicly about Houston's sign-stealing scheme during an appearance on "Golic and Wingo." “To go public with it and call them out and start all of this, it’s hard to swallow.” -@jessmendoza on former Astros pitcher Mike Fiers revealing the Astros sign-stealing scheme. pic.twitter.com/LSQY6B0dSC — Golic and Wingo (@GolicAndWingo) January 16, 2020 "Going public, yeah," Mendoza responded when asked if she had a problem with Fiers. "I mean, I get it.

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