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Sports PM avoids promising federal inquiry into Nova Scotia shooting rampage

01:00  23 may  2020
01:00  23 may  2020 Source:   msn.com

PM avoids promising federal inquiry into Nova Scotia shooting rampage

  PM avoids promising federal inquiry into Nova Scotia shooting rampage OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau won't commit to a federal inquiry into the recent Nova Scotia shootings. Nova Scotia's premier said this month he would not plan a public inquiry into the shooting and burning rampage that claimed 22 lives last month, saying the province is waiting to see what Trudeau's government decides. Stephen McNeil told reporters the province "will wait to see" what Ottawa commits to, other than an ongoing RCMP investigation.

HALIFAX — The Nova Scotia government has again rejected calls for a provincial public inquiry into the shooting rampage last month that claimed Police have said she managed to escape into nearby woods where she hid until early in the morning of April 19. Last week 33 Dalhousie University law

READ MORE: Nova Scotia shooting : A detailed timeline of how the rampage unfolded. Furey said he was also concerned about delays, noting that it took the province two years to organize a provincial inquiry to determine why former Canadian soldier Lionel Desmond fatally shot his mother, wife and

Justin Trudeau wearing a suit and tie © Provided by The Canadian Press

HALIFAX — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau won't commit to a federal inquiry into the recent Nova Scotia shootings, even as the province's premier continues to say it's up to Ottawa to take the lead in examining the tragedy.

Nova Scotia's premier said this month he would not initiate a public inquiry into the shooting rampage that claimed 22 lives last month, saying the province is waiting to see what Trudeau's government decides.

Stephen McNeil told reporters the province "will wait to see" what Ottawa commits to beyond the ongoing RCMP investigation, and McNeil has said he believes the key areas of jurisdiction — such as the procedures used by the Mounties — are federal.

Dalhousie law professors ask premier to launch public inquiry into mass shooting

  Dalhousie law professors ask premier to launch public inquiry into mass shooting Dalhousie law professors ask premier to launch public inquiry into mass shootingHALIFAX — More than 30 faculty members at Dalhousie University's law school have signed a letter urging Nova Scotia's premier to call an independent public inquiry into the shooting rampage that took 22 lives last month.

HALIFAX — The Nova Scotia government has again rejected calls for a provincial public inquiry into the shooting rampage last month that claimed 22 Last week 33 Dalhousie University law faculty members said Nova Scotia should lead a review of decisions made by the RCMP during the 13-hour

Nova Scotia shooting : shock at killings by 'quiet, gentle' denturist. Lisa Mccully, a teacher and mother of two, was also killed during the rampage , according to a post on An RCMP officer at the checkpoint on to Portapique Beach Road after a suspected shooter was taken into custody.

However, speaking to reporters Friday in Ottawa, Trudeau said the RCMP is still working on the case, and the federal government will work with Nova Scotia on what to do next. He sidestepped a question on whether his government will launch an inquiry federally.

"People have many questions about what happened in Nova Scotia, and we are encouraging the RCMP to do its work on the initial investigation, but as we move forward there will be of course larger questions to ask, and we will work with the government of Nova Scotia on getting those answers," Trudeau said.

Family members of victims and legal experts have repeatedly called for more information on the police handling of the rampage, which lasted more than 12 hours.

There have also been questions raised about how the RCMP informed the public of the shootings as they unfolded over five locations. The perpetrator's prior history of domestic violence has also been raised as a key issue to examine.

Photo shows replica RCMP car inside Nova Scotia gunman’s home months before rampage

  Photo shows replica RCMP car inside Nova Scotia gunman’s home months before rampage A photo taken inside the Nova Scotia gunman's home shows what appears to be the same mock cruiser used during the rampage. The photo shows a white Ford Taurus adorned with RCMP decals, and the identifying number 28B11. This appears to be the same number that RCMP highlighted on Twitter alerting the public to a mock cruiser the gunman used on April 18 and 19, as he killed 22 people in a series of shootings and house fires. Another photo also shows a fully stocked bar next to the vehicle. The photos are among several taken last November by a contractor who had discussed doing work at the gunman’s home.

Nova Scotia RCMP Chief Supt. Chris Leather told reporters during a press conference Wednesday afternoon that he is "very satisfied" with the way the RCMP communicated information during last weekend's deadly shooting rampage in Nova Scotia via Twitter, and had no issues with the

Ross Lord reports on the deadly mass shooting in Nova Scotia , where an accused gunman went on a 12-hour rampage , killing at multiple people in what's being

The Mounties provided a timeline of the rampage indicating that it began in Portapique, N.S., on April 18 after a domestic assault incident where the gunman, Gabriel Wortman, detained and abused his common law wife. Police have said she managed to escape into nearby woods where she hid until early in the morning of April 19.

Last week, a former neighbour of Wortman said she reported an account of a 2013 incident of domestic violence by Wortman against the common law spouse to the RCMP in Truro. Brenda Forbes said she reported witnesses telling her that Wortman had strangled and beaten his common law partner, and she said she told police there were guns in the house.

The RCMP said in an email Friday it is still looking for the police record of the incident and declined further comment.

Ed Ratushny, the author of "The Conduct of Public Inquiries," said in an interview that he firmly believes a public inquiry should be called and that it could be a joint federal-provincial effort. He said such an inquiry will be necessary to get to the bottom of what led to the mass shooting.

Psychological autopsy to be conducted on gunman of Nova Scotia mass shooting: RCMP

  Psychological autopsy to be conducted on gunman of Nova Scotia mass shooting: RCMP RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Lisa Croteau said the psychological autopsy will be conducted “with the intent of gathering insights into why he committed the acts of violence.” “This includes an analysis of his personality, past behaviour and how he related to others,” Croteau announced. READ MORE: Nova Scotia gunman was involved in several disputes before shooting, RCMP says Gabriel Wortman is the lone suspect in the shooting that spanned five rural Nova Scotia communities over a 13-hour period on April 18 and 19. The rampage began in Portapique, N.S., and ended roughly 100 kilometres away outside a gas station in Enfield, N.

Nova Scotia is waking up in a state of shock on Monday morning following a shooting rampage that has left at least 16 people dead including an RCMP officer, making it the worst mass shooting in modern Canadian history.

Nova Scotia RCMP Chief Supt. Chris Leather told reporters during a press conference Wednesday afternoon that he is "very satisfied" with the way the RCMP communicated information during last weekend's deadly shooting rampage in Nova Scotia via Twitter, and had no issues with the

The University of Ottawa professor emeritus of law said there are overlapping issues of provincial and federal jurisdiction.

He gave the example of the issue of domestic abuse, noting that the way support is provided to abuse victims is largely a provincial responsibility, while changes to relevant Criminal Code offences to prevent abuse would be a federal matter.

"I think there's much more room for provincial and federal governments for getting their acts together on inquiries, because the problems don't happen in silos. They're often very inter-related," he said.

"If they want to get to bottom of it, just get together and get a really good commissioner who has the trust of the public," he said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 22, 2020.

— With files from Jordan Press in Ottawa

Michael Tutton, The Canadian Press

Nova Scotia’s municipal elections to continue as planned in October, minister confirms .
Municipal affairs minister Chuck Porter said despite the unprecedented circumstances that it is critical to preserve and respect the democratic rights of Nova Scotians. He admits that it is unlikely to be a regular election. "Because the situation continues to be unpredictable, I encourage municipalities to continue their preparations for an October election with the current public health protocols in mind," Porter wrote. The minister said he believes there are a number of options for municipalities to conduct elections safely, including mail-in ballots, over the telephone, through the computer or by advance polling.

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