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Sports Wolff hurt by bad breaks, mistakes and DeChambeau at US Open

03:10  21 september  2020
03:10  21 september  2020 Source:   msn.com

Patience, pitching and big drives put DeChambeau in position

  Patience, pitching and big drives put DeChambeau in position Bryson DeChambeau held off on shakes and steaks to work on pitches and patience. All that work from the night before made him look like a genius come Friday. With the wind kicking up and the temperature dropping at Winged Foot, DeChambeau was one of the very few to conquer the U.S. Open-like conditions that finally showed up for the second round. He shot 2-under 68 to reach the halfway point at 3-under 137, one of only five players in red numbers with the afternoon starters about halfway through their rounds.

Matthew Wolff stood over the closest thing he'd find to an easy shot at Winged Foot: 103 yards away from the pin on a flat lie in the fairway.

It got worse from there. The player Wolff was chasing, Bryson DeChambeau , didn't make those kind of mistakes . After carrying a two-shot lead into Sunday, Wolff shot 5-over 75. He finished at even-par 280 and lost to DeChambeau by six shots. While giving all respect to DeChambeau , Wolff was hardly

a person swinging a golf club © Provided by The Canadian Press

Matthew Wolff stood over the closest thing he'd find to an easy shot at Winged Foot: 103 yards away from the pin on a flat lie in the fairway.

The 21-year-old basher, who gouged his way out of the rough all week at the U.S. Open, blocked the wedge into the deep grass to the right of the 11th green. A possible birdie attempt to stay within two ended up as a par to fall behind by three.

It got worse from there.

The player Wolff was chasing, Bryson DeChambeau, didn't make those kind of mistakes. After carrying a two-shot lead into Sunday, Wolff shot 5-over 75. He finished at even-par 280 and lost to DeChambeau by six shots.

Even without hostile NY crowds, this US Open is tough enough

  Even without hostile NY crowds, this US Open is tough enough It’s rare when fans wind up rooting for the golf course, even one as majestic as Winged Foot, but suddenly that’s a viable option. Maybe because the two players atop the leaderboard heading into Round 3 at the U.S. Open are not exactly — how to put this? — the most likeable guys in the game. Patrick Reed, who leads at 4-under 136, has been hounded by cheating allegations since college. They spilled out in public last December after he was slapped with a two-stroke penalty for intentionally (Reed denied that part) improving his lie in a waste bunker at the World Hero Challenge.

Matthew Wolff , of the United States , walks up to the 15th green during the final round of the US Open Golf Championship, Sunday, Sept. It got worse from there. The player Wolff was chasing, Bryson DeChambeau , didn’t make those kind of mistakes . After carrying a two-shot lead into Sunday, Wolff

It got worse from there. The player Wolff was chasing, Bryson DeChambeau , didn’t make those kind of mistakes . After carrying a two-shot lead into Sunday, Wolff shot 5-overr 75. He finished at even-par 280 and lost to DeChambeau by six shots. While giving all respect to DeChambeau

While giving all respect to DeChambeau, Wolff was hardly convinced he'd played 10 strokes worse than Saturday when he shot 65 to take the lead.

"There were a couple shots, a couple 3 woods, that I hit that were really uncharacteristic," Wolff said. "Those were pretty bad, but, yeah, not 10 shots worse."

If part of it was his own mistakes, another part of it, in Wolff's view, were breaks that didn't go his way.

On the par-3 10th, he was standing just above the deepest bunker on the course, forced to grip halfway down the shaft of his wedge to make contact to pitch the ball onto the green. That led to a bogey.

On the par-5 12th, both his and DeChambeau's drives bounced in the rough. DeChambeau's ball careened into the fairway. Wolff's lodged in the deep grass. Both players made par, but by that point, Wolff trailed by three and needed something better.

Column: No fans could be advantage for Wolff in US Open

  Column: No fans could be advantage for Wolff in US Open Matthew Wolff deserved some cheers for the way he picked apart Winged Foot on Saturday afternoon to move into the lead of the U.S. Open. Patrick Reed and Bryson DeChambeau deserved something, too, and rowdy New York fans would have been sure to give it to them had they been allowed to be there to watch. They weren’t, of course, and the Open suffered because of it. So, likely, did the TV ratings, which already figured to take a hit because Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson were long gone. No stars. No buzz. No fun, unless you like watching scenes of players studying maps on the greens like they were preparing for the invasion of Normandy.

US Open third-round leaderboard. -5 M Wolff ( US ); -3 B DeChambeau ( US ); -1 L Oosthuizen (SA); Level H Matsuyama (Jpn), X Schauffele ( US ); +1 R Wolff , playing in only his second major after qualifying for this tournament by tying for fourth at last month's US PGA Championship, holed five

Matthew Wolff celebrated an "exceptional" performance on his US Open debut, despite finishing six shots behind champion Bryson DeChambeau . Playing in only his second major championship, Wolff slept on a two-shot lead after the third round but could not keep pace with DeChambeau 's

"A foot or a couple inches more, and I have a different lie, or it stays up on a ridge, or things like that, can be three, four shots," Wolff said. “If I’m that much closer to Bryson coming down the stretch, I’m sure he feels a little bit more pressure."

Wolff was trying to become the youngest player since Bobby Jones in 1923 to win America's championship. Instead, the reigning NCAA champion out of Oklahoma State ended up with his first runner-up finish — part of a two-man show that really was all about one guy, DeChambeau, by the end.

The matchup was billed as a showdown between two players who, for the first three days at least, shunned the normal U.S. Open doctrine — caring not as much about hitting fairways, and instead feeling perfectly comfortable relying on their power and strength to gouge short shots out of the rough.

The funny thing: Wolff hit two fairways to open the day and three fairways over the front nine. That was one more than he hit all of Saturday.

The Latest: DeChambeau moves into the lead at US Open

  The Latest: DeChambeau moves into the lead at US Open MAMARONECK, N.Y. — The Latest from the final round of the U.S. Open, golf’s second major of the year (all times EDT): ___ 3:05 p.m. Bryson DeChambeau has moved into the lead at the U.S. Open. DeChambeau birdied the fourth hole and is one of only two players under par for the day as the winds picked up at Winged Foot. Overnight leader Matthew Wolff was 2 over, picking up his second bogey on No. 5 to drop into second place at 3 under. Louis Oosthuizen is even for the day and remains third at 1 under. Justin Thomas is the only other golfer in the red, at 1 under. The leaders are through six holes. ___ 1:35 p.m. It was an ugly start to the final round for Rory McIlroy and Harris English.

Wolff , who edged Morikawa and DeChambeau for his first PGA TOUR victory at the 3M Open just over a year ago, finished 35th in His mistake in Detroit, Wolff said, was looking ahead and getting “antsy” to start the final round, a gaffe he is hoping to avoid Sunday. He said he has played this week

MAMARONECK-Matthew Wolff , playing in only his second major, stole the show at an unforgiving Winged Foot with a scorching start and steady finish to grab an unlikely two-shot lead over big-hitting Bryson DeChambeau after the third round on Saturday. Wolff , 21, began the day four shots behind

But on Saturday, he made five birdies on the front to shoot 30. On Sunday, he made three bogeys over the first eight holes. And even his eagle on the par-5 ninth felt like something less. He had to make it simply to stay one back after DeChambeau made a 40-foot putt for an eagle of his own.

Wolff was well aware that at most U.S. Opens, even par over four days would be something to celebrate. That score would’ve won four of the previous five Opens played at Winged Foot, which gave up exactly one below-par score — DeChambeau’s — over Sunday’s final round.

In fact, were it not for DeChambeau, this would’ve been some kind of walk to the 18th green for Wolff. He stuck his approach to 10 feet and got ready to line up a putt for what could've been his only birdie of the day.

But if there was any lingering doubt about who Sunday really belonged to, the ensuing scene on the green confirmed it.

DeChambeau, who was just behind Wolff on the same line, rolled in his clinching par putt and thrust his fists up to celebrate. Wolff followed with one of the most meaningless birdie attempts of his young career.

It stayed just right of the cup. He tapped in for par. And par for the course on a day that, in Wolff's words, “just wasn't meant to be.”

Eddie Pells, The Associated Press

Mickelson and late-night range session key for DeChambeau .
MAMARONECK, N.Y. — Two moments were key for Bryson DeChambeau winning the U.S. Open. The first one was early in the week, when he played a practice round at Winged Foot with Phil Mickelson. By then, DeChambeau already was sold on his plan of hitting driver every chance he could because it would be difficult for him and everyone else to hit many fairways. But it was during that practice round that Mickelson shared his experiences from 2006, when Lefty hit only one fairway in the final round and still nearly won. “He said, ‘In 2006, I had the best short-game week of my life,’ and that really stuck out to me for some reason,” DeChambeau said.

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