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Sports Sasakamoose, Indigenous NHLer, dies at age 86 after presumed COVID-19 case

01:45  25 november  2020
01:45  25 november  2020 Source:   msn.com

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Fred Sasakamoose , who became the first Indigenous person to play in the NHL, is battling presumed COVID - 19 in a Saskatchewan hospital At the age of 20, Sasakamoose made history by skating onto the ice at Maple Leaf Gardens, becoming the first Indigenous person to play in the NHL after earning

According to Sasakamoose , "The priests never talked twice. After retiring from ice hockey, Sasakamoose became a band councillor on his home reserve and later chief for six years. ^ "First Indigenous NHLer, Fred Sasakamoose , hospitalized with presumed COVID - 19 ". globalnews.ca.

Fred Sasakamoose, one of the first Indigenous players in the NHL, has died after battling a presumed case of COVID-19.

  Sasakamoose, Indigenous NHLer, dies at age 86 after presumed COVID-19 case © Provided by The Canadian Press

He was 86.

Fred's son, Neil, announced his death on Tuesday in a video posted on Facebook.

Neil said last week that his father had been hospitalized in Saskatchewan for a presumed case of COVID-19 after experiencing wheezing and chest pains.

Sasakamoose played 11 NHL games with the Blackhawks in 1953-54, becoming one of the first Indigenous players in the then-six-team league.

During his time in Chicago, he faced off against greats like Maurice Richard and Gordie Howe.

Fred Sasakamoose, one of NHL's first Indigenous players, "presumed" COVID-19 positive

  Fred Sasakamoose, one of NHL's first Indigenous players, Fred Sasakamoose, one of the first Indigenous athletes to play in the National Hockey League, has been hospitalized over a presumed positive COVID-19 test. Sasakamoose's condition was first revealed through a Facebook post on his official page Friday. Fred's son, Neil, later announced through a video on Facebook Saturday that his father had been admitted to hospital after feeling shortness of breath and wheezing. Neil and his mother were first told that Fred tested positive for COVID-19, but were later notified that he was being treated as a "presumed" positive COVID-19 case and is currently in a local hospital's isolation unit.

Ramallah, Nov 24 (Petra) –– The Palestinian Health Ministry said Tuesday that it recorded 17 coronavirus deaths and 1,946 infections in the last 24 hours. Minister Mai Al-Kaileh said in the daily epidemiological report in Palestine that the recovery rate from the virus was 82.2

Tabulated data on provisional COVID - 19 deaths by age , sex, race and Hispanic origin, and comorbidities. Also includes an index of state-level and Weekly Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics. Provisional Death Counts for Coronavirus Disease 2019 ( COVID - 19 ).

He also had a storied junior career, playing several seasons with the Moose Jaw Canucks of the Western Canadian Junior Hockey League.

Sasakamoose was one of 11 children, though only five survived childhood. He was forcibly taken from his community in central Saskatchewan to a residential school as a child, and told a Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearing in 2012 that he had been sexually abused by other students there.

He also recalled being whipped and having coal oil poured over his head.

While at the school he encountered a reverend who was convinced he could make Sasakamoose into a big-time hockey player.

"He said to me, 'Freddie, I'm going to make you a champion,'" Sasakamoose recalled in a video released by Hockey Canada in 2017.

Indigenous hockey icon Sasakamoose hospitalized with potential case of COVID-19

  Indigenous hockey icon Sasakamoose hospitalized with potential case of COVID-19 Fred Sasakamoose, one of the first Indigenous players in NHL history, has been hospitalized due to a suspected case of COVID-19. The hockey pioneer was admitted to a health facility Friday for treatment after having symptoms for a couple of days, according to a Facebook post from the official account of his national hockey championship. He was presumed positive at the time and was awaiting test results. Sasakamoose's son, Neil, said SaturdayThe hockey pioneer was admitted to a health facility Friday for treatment after having symptoms for a couple of days, according to a Facebook post from the official account of his national hockey championship. He was presumed positive at the time and was awaiting test results.

The service links COVID - 19 related data like a health questionnaire and temperature check to The great irony is that George Orwell’s 1984 never arrived in 1984, but in 2020 Covid - 19 could perhaps more accurately be called ’Covid-1984’ for all the restrictive, authoritarian measures it has ushered in.

If Covid - 19 killed 30,000, and lockdown killed the other 30,000, then the lockdown was a complete and utter waste of time. and should never happen again. The great fear is that this would be a message this government does not want to hear – so they will do everything possible not to hear it.

Being someone young Indigenous people could look up to was important to Sasakamoose.

"To pave the way for Indian kids and the Metis, they look at you as a role model and they say 'Wow.' They look at my rings and my pictures. This is what I gain in life. This is what brought me to where I am," he said in the video.

"It's for you now to follow in the footsteps — maybe be better."

When his playing career came to an end, Sasakamoose returned to the Ahtahkoakoop Cree Nation north of Saskatoon. He became a band councillor and chief, and worked to develop minor hockey and other sports programs across Saskatchewan.

He was named to the Order of Canada in 2017, and given an honorary doctorate of law by the University of Saskatchewan earlier this year.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the convocation ceremony was virtual so Sasakamoose recorded a video message.

"I had a hard time of life," he said. "You want to be somebody, then it takes, you know, a little more effort."

Still, the Indigenous hockey pioneer wanted his story to be heard. His book, "Call Me Indian," is set to come out in April.

"Time will come when I am no longer here," Sasakamoose said in his convocation message. "But my voice you will always use."

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 24, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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