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Sports ESPN's Tiger Woods documentary will explore golf star's racial journey from childhood until now

16:36  27 november  2020
16:36  27 november  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

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The one-hour documentary explores the significance of Woods becoming the first Black golfer to win a major championship at the Masters in 1997 and how it changed perceptions of him across racial and ethnic lines. The documentary is the latest project from ESPN ' s The Undefeated, which explores the

ESPN ’ s The Undefeated drops its “ Tiger Woods : America’ s Son” next Sunday at 7 p.m. ET, and By the looks of this trailer, the documentary will explore American society’ s complex relationship with The one-hour documentary will examine @ TigerWoods ' complex racial identity & the meaning of

There’s a scene early in the upcoming ESPN documentary “Tiger Woods: America’s Son” that’s striking because it’s something we haven’t seen Woods do seemingly in years — and that’s talk bluntly, and fearlessly, about race.

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Ten years ago, Tiger Woods sat in his boyhood home across from his father' s body, waiting on the men from the funeral home to arrive and carry Earl away. Tiger got the call and came straight to Cypress, passing the Navy golf course where he learned to play, turning finally onto Teakwood Street.

An interviewer asks a then 14-year-old Woods if he’s ever experienced racism at the different country clubs where he’s played. Woods, with a single brace covering the top part of his wide-eyed smile, answers without hesitation.

Tiger Woods holding a green ball © Michael Madrid, USA TODAY Sports Tiger Woods

“Oh, every day,” Woods responded. “Not every day, but every time I go to a major country club, always feel it, can always sense it. People always staring at you. ‘What are you doing here? You shouldn’t be here.’”

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Woods then says he wanted to win the Masters because of how, “Blacks have been treated there. (People say) they shouldn’t be there. If I win that tournament it might be really big for us.”

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“Since I’m Black, I might be even bigger than Jack Nicklaus,” Woods adds. “I might be even bigger than him. To the Blacks. I might be a Michael Jordan in basketball. Something like that.”

Woods said that in 1990; he was Golfstradamus.

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It's possible you've seen the clips of Woods before, but they hit differently now amid a massively divided nation and knowing Woods has morphed from someone who spoke about race freely to a man who does so reluctantly.

The documentary, done in partnership with The Undefeated, an ESPN asset that explores the intersections of sports, race and culture, doesn’t necessarily shed any new light on Woods. It airs at 7 p.m. ET on Nov. 29 on ESPN.

Tiger Woods, Donald Trump, Melania Trump posing for the camera: Tiger Woods poses with his son Charlie Axel Woods, daughter Sam Alexis Woods, mother Kultida Woods, and girlfriend Erica Herman along with U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump after being presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. © Scott Taetsch, Scott Taetsch-USA TODAY Sports Tiger Woods poses with his son Charlie Axel Woods, daughter Sam Alexis Woods, mother Kultida Woods, and girlfriend Erica Herman along with U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump after being presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

But it’s still a wonderfully told, at times emotional, and always extremely frank story about the powerful uniqueness of Woods. It examines how he’s both viewed himself over the decades and how Blacks have viewed Woods as both an inspirational, almost God-like figure while simultaneously questioning his authenticity.

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It’s required viewing for anyone who wants to understand not just Woods, but the history of golf and race.

The documentary, like its subject matter, is layered. It gives multi-faceted views on Woods, with interviewees both critical and supportive of him.

What's most stunning are the contrasting versions of Woods. In 1992, at the age of 16, Woods spoke of how he could be one of the leading figures in the Black community.

“(Black golfers) Jim Thorpe, Calvin Peete, they’re all past their prime,” Woods said, “and then there’s me, but there’s nobody in between. So I guess you could say I am the so-called next leader for the Black race. That is kinda sad to say that though because there’s nobody out there. It’s kinda hard to believe.”

It's difficult to reconcile that Woods with the one who released a bland statement following the death of George Floyd.

Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Clarence Page says in the documentary that Woods' statement sounded "...a lot more neutral than I would have sounded. It was like he was bending over backwards to be neutral. You can't be neutral on something like this. You have to be on one side or the other. And at this point people are turning to Tiger Woods as an opinion leader. I thought he let people down."

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Some of the best parts of the documentary are the reactions of Black golfers and caddies who watched Woods grow up, how he positively impacted them, and still does.

One such conversation happens with a group of golfers called the Pittsburgh Duffers, which started in 1952, and was formed because Blacks were prohibited from playing on white courses in the area. A member describes how he wasn’t allowed to play golf at  Oakmont Country Club in Pennsylvania, and instead played on the course directly next to it, where a fence separated the two courses. To them, the fence, which they could see through, stood as a metaphor.

The line of demarcation for Woods embracing his Blackness and then entering into more, well, complex territory was when he went on "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in 1997 and called himself “Cablinasian.” The word represented his multi-racial background (Caucasian, Black, Indian and Asian).

To some Black golfers, and others, Woods calling himself that represented Woods distancing himself from his Black heritage.

“What a lot of people saw or heard was, ‘Here’s one more effort by a young black man to avoid being Black,” says Page in the documentary. “Or avoid being called Black. Or avoid being associated with it.”

This is one of the most intelligent parts of the documentary. Not only does it refuse to avoid the racial complexities of Woods, it deconstructs them, embraces them, and gleefully juggles them all simultaneously and with skill.

Upcoming ESPN documentary examines Woods and racial identity

  Upcoming ESPN documentary examines Woods and racial identity A look at Tiger Woods through the prisms of race and identity will be the subject of an of an ESPN documentary debuting later this month. “Tiger Woods: America’s Son” will premiere on Nov. 29. The one-hour documentary explores the significance of Woods becoming the first Black golfer to win a major championship at the Masters in 1997 and how it changed perceptions of him across racial and ethnic lines. The documentary is the latest project from ESPN's The Undefeated, which explores the intersection of sports, race and culture. TheUndefeated.com launched in May 2016 to provide reporting and analysis centred on Black athletes as well as issues outside sports.

It does, in other words, what society sometimes fails to.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: ESPN's Tiger Woods documentary will explore golf star's racial journey from childhood until now

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This is interesting!