Technology: Greta Thunberg was right: There is an alternative to 'eternal economic growth': Don Pittis - - PressFrom - Canada
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Technology Greta Thunberg was right: There is an alternative to 'eternal economic growth': Don Pittis

12:45  26 september  2019
12:45  26 september  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Greta Thunberg invited to Montreal’s climate march

Greta Thunberg invited to Montreal’s climate march The 16-year-old Swedish activist arrived in New York City on Wednesday after she set sail in a zero-emissions sailboat from Europe.

15 year old activist Greta Thunberg speaks truth to power at the UN COP24 climate talks: "My name is Greta Thunberg . But to do that , we have to speak clearly, no matter how uncomfortable that may be . You only speak of green eternal economic growth because you are too scared of being unpopular.

Greta Thunberg . Swedish school strike activist demands economists tackle runaway global warming. But unless we recognise the overall failures of our current systems, we most probably don ’t stand a chance. This is an edited version of a speech given by Greta Thunberg at Davos this week.

a person posing for the camera: Climate activist Greta Thunberg glares at U.S. President Donald Trump at the U.N. shortly after her speech where she called endless economic growth a 'fairy tale.'© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Climate activist Greta Thunberg glares at U.S. President Donald Trump at the U.N. shortly after her speech where she called endless economic growth a 'fairy tale.' In a quote heard around the world this week a 16-year-old climate activist threw down the gauntlet.

Greta Thunberg's passion reached deep into our hearts when she angrily called on our leaders to stop the suffering and dying, to stop entire ecosystems from collapsing.

But with the next sentence in that widely quoted appeal for action, Thunberg did something many of the most powerful people in the world will find harder to swallow: she thrust a knife into the beating heart of conventional economics.

Bernier walks back 'mentally unstable' attack on Greta Thunberg - then calls activist a 'pawn'

Bernier walks back 'mentally unstable' attack on Greta Thunberg - then calls activist a 'pawn' Maxime Bernier has taken to Twitter to explain a series of controversial tweets the People's Party of Canada leader made calling Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg "mentally unstable." On September 2, Bernier posted a series of tweets in which he said Thunberg is "clearly mentally unstable. Not only autistic, but obsessive-compulsive, eating disorder, depression and lethargy and she lives in a constant state of fear." Bernier went on to suggest that Thunberg's climate activism is spreading irrational fears about the environment to get the rest of the world "to feel the same.

The journey of Greta Thunberg ’s activism reads like a Biblical tale: from sitting alone with a placard on a Stockholm street last August, to leading tens thousands of Greta Thunberg is not actually a messenger from God. Her youth, purity or lack of doubt are not evidence of her actually being right .

Donald Trump made fun of Greta Thunberg ’s emotional climate-change speech at the United Nations in a late-night tweet Monday. We are at the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth .

"We are at the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. How dare you!"

To most economists, money and endless economic growth are no fairy tales, they are essential to how the world works, how lives are improved, how people earn their living.

But there is another way of understanding economics that comes under the general title of sustainable prosperity, and a Canadian economist is one of the world's principal exponents of how such a system would work.

Business contribution

Tomorrow, as students and many others participate in the strike for climate change, there are signs business would like to show support. Mountain Equipment Co-op will close its doors. Upmarket fashion brand Patagonia has offered space for sign-making. Amazon's Jeff Bezos has announced he will buy electric delivery vans once they become available. Canada's financial sector has expressed concern.

Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg says she's coming to Montreal

Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg says she's coming to Montreal The 16-year-old is set to attend a scheduled climate protest on Sept. 27 to call on governments to take concrete action to combat climate change. Thunberg is currently in New York to spread her message of the importance of fighting against the climate crisis. She had previously expressed her interest in coming to Montreal for the march, according to Ben Clarkson, a spokesperson for La Planète s'invite au Parlement, which is organizing the event. "The invitation was met warmly by Greta's representative," he said in August.

Swedish teenage climate alarmist Greta Thunberg is one of four winners of the 2019 Right Livelihood Award, known as the Scandinavian country’s so-called alternative to the We are in the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth .

We are in the middle of a climate breakdown, and all they can talk about is money and fairytales of eternal economic growth , says climate activist Greta Thunberg .

Asked by host Laura Lynch on CBC Radio's The Current this week about talk of business contributions to the climate change fight, environmentalist Bill McKibben was skeptical.

"The talk is growing, but it's not about how the financial sector is fighting climate change," said McKibben, a founder of the group 350.org, "It's about how the financial sector is continuing to propel climate change."

McKibben cited a list of the world's biggest banks that continue to invest in the carbon-intensive industries that are making climate change worse. Four of Canada's big banks — RBC, TD, Scotia and BMO — are in the global top 10.

Canadian economist and author Peter Victor, who studied at UBC and taught at Toronto's York University, says that conflict between words and investment is the crux of the collision between the traditional way of thinking about business — the idea of investing for endless growth — that has to be overcome to stop climate change.

Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg 'doesn't understand' Alberta, environment minister says

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Greta Thunberg 's UN Speech refers to a passionate speech delivered by climate activist Greta Thunberg at the United Nations climate action summit in late September 2019. Know Your Meme is an advertising supported site and we noticed that you're using an ad-blocking solution.

Thunberg is right – change is coming. There are leaders of countries and businesses making commitments to tackle climate change. Local governments, like California, are trying to move ahead on their own when their countries abdicate their responsibility. And, as Thunberg exemplifies, younger

And clearly, for most economic thinkers trapped in the long-held view that boosting GDP with industrial growth is the most important job for governments and business, Victor's newly reissued book Managing Without Growth: Slower by Design, Not Disaster may be difficult reading.

"Most economists would really take the position that there is no choice: If you don't have growth, the system would collapse," said Victor this week from a cabin somewhere near Algonquin Park.

Prosperity without growth

Victor has created a low-growth simulation model for the Canadian economy to demonstrate that there is a choice. Getting from here to there may be difficult, but in principle he says his work shows there are no economic reasons why Canada cannot be prosperous in the absence of traditional, industrial, GDP-style growth.

As he describes in a slightly out-of-date 2013 video lecture embedded below, the concept of economic growth is a relatively recent post-war invention. According to the 2016 book The Rise and Fall of American Growth, the growth era may be ending in any case.

Alberta truck convoy plans counter-protest to climate rally with Greta Thunberg

  Alberta truck convoy plans counter-protest to climate rally with Greta Thunberg EDMONTON — A group oil and gas supporters is planning a counter-rally when Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg shows up at the Alberta legislature. Glen Carritt, who organized the United We Roll convoy that travelled to Ottawa in February, says a similar convoy will start in Red Deer, Alta., on Friday morning and make its way to Edmonton.Carritt says the trucks are expected to arrive at the legislature at noon, when a climate rally is to begin with 16-year-old Thunberg.He says Albertans in the oil and gas sector are frustrated with celebrities visiting the province and telling them how to run their business.

Greta Thunberg addressed world leaders through tears: 'How dare you! You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words.' In November, when she was a ninth grader, Thunberg staged a strike for two weeks outside the Swedish parliament, demanding that the government cut

Climate activist Greta Thunberg , 16, addressed the U.N.'s Climate Action Summit in New York City on Monday. Here's the full transcript of Thunberg 's speech, beginning with her We are in the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth .

But endless growth could be replaced by shifting growth.

"Even in an economy that is not growing, you can have a lot of dynamic change," said Victor. "We need some sectors to grow if we're going to switch from fossil fuels to renewables, for instance."

And we will still have to keep busy, not least in figuring out ways of making our economy keep ticking in the face of climate change. Building sea walls to protect a city does not increase output like building a new factory or increasing oil output, but it is useful.

So are many things that are not traditionally seen as helping the economy grow, including creating art, looking after friends and family, participating in political activity — things not properly captured in GDP and therefore not contributing to growth. Maybe economists can recalibrate our system to value those activities.

Studies of well-being have indicated that faster growth does not give people more free time or make people happier. A low-growth economy could do that.

Repeated analysis has shown that the current understanding of economic growth is using up the planet's resources at a rate that cannot be sustained. As the title of Victor's book implies, disaster would end growth one way or another, just more abruptly.

According to Victor, adapting to a low-growth economy will be complex and demanding, but there will be many compensations, such as not destroying the planet and not driving the rest of the world's plants and animals into extinction. Of course, that was Thunberg's point.

Follow Don on Twitter @don_pittis

Climate change activist Greta Thunberg visits glacier in Jasper National Park .
JASPER, Alta. — Climate change activist Greta Thunberg has visited a glacier in Jasper National Park on her way to Vancouver to attend a climate rally. In a tweet to her followers, the Swedish teenager thanked scientist John Pomeroy of the University of Saskatchewan and Parks Canada's Brenda Shepherd for educating her on the effects of the climate on the national park in Alberta. Shepherd is an ecologist for Parks Canada and Pomeroy is the director of the Global Water Futures Program, a university-led freshwater research project.Pomeroy says they spent about six hours on the Athabasca Glacier, talking about how it has retreated due to climate change.

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