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Technology The most productive countries where people work least hours

17:15  02 december  2019
17:15  02 december  2019 Source:   lovemoney.com

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a close up of a green plant: A close-up of a cannabis plant in a production facility in Kelowna, B.C. © Flowr Corporation A close-up of a cannabis plant in a production facility in Kelowna, B.C.

New Brunswick is adding illegal cannabis to the list of activities that can be reported for investigation.

According to the government, it would be an amendment to the Safer Communities and Neighbourhoods Act.

“The federal decriminalizing of cannabis has limited our ability to effectively use this legislation when dealing with properties engaged in illegal cannabis-related activities,” said Public Safety Minister Carl Urquhart in a media release.

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“This amendment would ensure the continued provision of a civil legal process to shut down such properties.”

The purpose of the safer communities legislation, according to the province, is to protect against the harmful effects of specified illegal activities including the use of properties for selling illegal drugs.

Prior to October 2018, cannabis was included in the legislation.

Cannabis remains a regulated commodity under federal legislation. The Safer Communities and Neighbourhoods Act currently covers other regulated commodities and activities, such as the unlawful sale of liquor and illegal gaming.

READ MORE: 9 people charged in illegal sale of cannabis outside dispensary, Toronto police say

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The proposed amendment would add to the definition of "specified use" the possession, consumption, purchase, sale, distribution or cultivation of cannabis in contravention of federal legislation.

“We are concerned about illegal cannabis-related activities,” said Urquhart.

“This amendment will ensure that residents who have concerns regarding these activities can make a confidential complaint for investigation.”

According to the government, the Safer Communities and Neighbourhoods Act provides for a confidential complaint-driven process which holds both commercial and residential property owners and their tenants accountable for specific illegal activities that have been proven to be habitually occurring and have adversely affected the health, safety or security of any individual or group in a community or neighbourhood.

It targets and, if necessary, shuts down properties, including lands, through a civil legal process.

Liberals face prickly decision over fate of controversial Challenger jets .
OTTAWA — The clock is ticking on the federal government's fleet of Challenger executive planes, as outdated technology on two of the four aircraft mean they will no longer be allowed to fly in many countries — or even in Canada — in the next few years. The need to replace the Challengers was flagged to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in a memo from officials following the election, but making such a decision could be easier said than done given the controversy that has long attached itself to the planes.

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