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Technology Toronto city council approves 4.24% residential property tax hike for 2020

11:15  20 february  2020
11:15  20 february  2020 Source:   cbc.ca

William B.P. Robson: Seriously Toronto, another tax hike? A $1.4 billion surplus isn’t big enough?

  William B.P. Robson: Seriously Toronto, another tax hike? A $1.4 billion surplus isn’t big enough? William B.P. Robson: Seriously Toronto, another tax hike? A $1.4 billion surplus isn’t big enough?Toronto city council has just approved an extra increase in property taxes — another 1.0 per cent in 2020 and 2021 on top of a previously approved 0.5 per cent hike, and a full 1.5 per cent for four years starting in 2022. Mayor John Tory, previously a staunch supporter of holding the line on property taxes, pushed it. The vote went 22-3 in favour — a convincing margin considering most politicians hate to vote for higher taxes. Even many conservative commentators praised the hike as necessary to support social services and better infrastructure.

Toronto city council approved its .5 billion operating budget and its .4 billion 10-year capital budget at a special meeting on Wednesday. On Wednesday morning, council approved new property tax rates for 2020 . Residential property taxes will rise 4 . 24 per cent in 2020 , council

City council has rubber stamped a property tax hike that is part of a .53 billion 2020 The two percent property tax hike was passed by a vote of 21-3 and is part of an overall 4 . 24 per It means the average Toronto homeowner will see an increase of 8 on a home that is valued at 0,000.

Joe Cressy wearing a suit and tie: Coun. Joe Cressy says: 'We have said since day one as a city, that the province needs to reverse these cuts, but we're not going to stand by and let our residents down.' © Paul Borkwood/ CBC News Coun. Joe Cressy says: 'We have said since day one as a city, that the province needs to reverse these cuts, but we're not going to stand by and let our residents down.' Toronto city council approved its $13.5 billion operating budget and its $43.4 billion 10-year capital budget at a special meeting on Wednesday.

On Wednesday morning, council approved new property tax rates for 2020. Residential property taxes will rise 4.24 per cent in 2020, council decided.

For the average homeowner, the property tax increases mean roughly an additional $130 this year.

The 4.24 per cent includes:

  • A two per cent inflationary increase in average residential property taxes to support city operating budget expenses.
  • A 1.5 per cent increase in the city building fund to support transit and housing capital projects.
  • A .74 per cent increase in average residential property taxes that results from a tax shift from industrial and commercial properties to residential properties in line with city policies and provincial law.

Mayor calls budget 'good, responsible, realistic'

"This is a good, responsible, realistic, forward-looking budget for a very fast growing and very successful city," Mayor John Tory told reporters on Wednesday at a news conference.

Dan Fumano: Why falling property assessments won't mean lower property taxes

  Dan Fumano: Why falling property assessments won't mean lower property taxes Every year, whether land values are going up or down, experts working in the field say the same confusion persists about the relationship between property assessments and taxes. And this year, the confusion may be particularly widespread. That’s because while last year’s assessments saw declines in the upper end of Vancouver’s housing market, 2020 marks only the fifth time since B.C. Assessment’s inception in 1974 — and the first time in 20 years — that the province’s assessed values saw an overall decline . (B.C.’s overall assessment values also decreased in 2000, 1999, 1987 and 1983).

2020 Property Tax Rates will be available when City Council determines the 2020 Tax and Rate Supported Budget in February 2020 . Estimated taxes on a residential property with an Assessed Value of 5,600 Estimated property tax = Assessed Value x Residential Total Tax Rate = 5

On Wednesday, city council approved this year’s .5-billion operating budget by a vote of 21-3. The .4-billion, 10-year capital budget was passed at a previous meeting. Toronto Mayor John Tory. The 2020 residential tax hike includes a 2% inflationary increase, amounting to an additional to the

"The budget is balanced in the sense that the revenues meet the expenditures as is required by law. But I believe it is also balanced in the context of balancing all the competing interests and different interests that the city has."

Tory acknowledged that many Toronto residents are facing financial challenges, but said the operating budget includes $79.4 million in new investments in "key" areas, preserves existing services and finds efficiencies in city government.

These key areas include $27.8 million for safety and security, $15.3 million for poverty reduction, $9.5 million for transit and $5.9 million for climate change.

"I understand that people, in many cases, are finding life stressful on a financial basis today, but together with a modest tax increase, we're also doing things to try to make their lives more affordable," Tory said.

Saskatoon pro-life group vows to try again after council rejection

  Saskatoon pro-life group vows to try again after council rejection Carole Tokaruk thinks her right to free speech was denied by Saskatoon city council and she plans to keep trying to get Respect for Life week proclaimed. Council voted unanimously on Monday to deny an appeal of the decision by the city clerk’s office to reject a proclamation request by Saskatoon Alliance for Life, a pro-life group. The Respect for Life proclamation was not rejected solely because the abortion issue is considered controversial or divisive. Part of the justification city clerk Joanne Sproule explained to city council on Monday included a lack of evidence that the group was a registered non-profit company or a charity.

A tax hike that is expected to raise billions of dollars for transit and housing has been approved by city council following an hours-long debate. On Tuesday afternoon, council voted 21-3 in favour of Mayor John Tory’s plan to increase and extend an existing levy on property taxes known as the city

Last year, city council approved a property tax hike of 4.4 per cent for 2019. Funding for downtown arena study approved . But city officials said Wednesday that they don't expect to report back on candidate sites until January or February 2020 . By far the biggest item approved was million for

"It will cost a lot more in the future if we don't invest in transit and affordable housing and community safety now."

Budget means more police, TTC staff, paramedics, librarians

The mayor says the operating budget means the city will be able to hire 300 police officers, 121 TTC operators, 62 paramedics and 21 librarians to staff youth hubs.

"These are people who will be visible to the taxpayers, to the people of Toronto every single day, on the street, delivering services to people, driving buses, saving lives, keeping us safe," Tory said.

Tory also acknowledged that the budget relies upon $77 million from the federal government for refugees and he said he expects Ottawa to "step up again." City officials have said that refugees are under federal jurisdiction.

"I have been talking to them about that. I've had lots of positive feedback. No cheques yet, but I am confident that they will understand that the responsibility is not a one-off deal that happened last year, that we'll get that funding again," he said.

City puts plan to tax vacant homes on hold, but the idea isn't dead quite yet

  City puts plan to tax vacant homes on hold, but the idea isn't dead quite yet A proposed tax on vacant homes in Toronto will likely be delayed by at least another year after the concept was found to be in need of more investigation during the city’s 2020 budget discussions.On Tuesday, Coun. Brad Bradford asked the city's chief financial officer to complete a report on the proposal by the second quarter of 2020, after the city's upcoming budget has been set.

TORONTO -- A budget that includes funding to hire additional police officers, paramedics and TTC operators will go to city council for final approval The operating budget, which was unanimously approved by Mayor John Tory’s executive committee last week, includes a two per cent property tax

The residential tax hike includes a 0.5 per cent levy to help fund a shortfall in the extension of the Bloor-Danforth subway line into Scarborough -- an extension that Ford loudly supported and voted for. Council is still debating other matters in the budget but the property tax issue has been the main

As for the capital budget, the city said in a news release on Wednesday: "The plan meets the city's most critical needs for transportation, the environment, real estate and emergency service facilities. The plan invests a total of $13.2 billion in transit, nearly doubling the investment in state-of-good-repair this year."

Province must reverse municipal cuts, Cressy says

Coun. Joe Cressy, who represents Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York, said the city needs to increase property taxes to make up lost revenue after the Doug Ford government cut $7 million from municipal services last year.

"We have said since day one as a city, that the province needs to reverse these cuts, but we're not going to stand by and let our residents down."

In the release, the city added that it considered the needs of its most vulnerable residents.

"As part of the 2020 budget process, programs and agencies considered the impact on all Torontonians, analyzing the effect of budget changes on equity-seeking groups, such as residents with low incomes," the release reads.

"The budget includes more than $25 million in poverty reduction and anti-violence community investments to make city services and programs more accessible."

The overall average budgetary increase is 1.43 per cent, the city said.

COVID-19: Edmonton warns motorists against speeding on bare streets as city sees sharp increase in one week .
Edmonton’s traffic safety team is asking motorists to ease off the gas on bare city streets, alarmed by a 200 per cent increase in speeding 50 km/h over the limit in one week. Fewer cars in front of you on the roads doesn’t mean speeding is OK, city spokeswoman Althea Livingston said in a statement Thursday morning. There was a 30 per cent decrease of vehicles on Edmonton roads last week with many residents staying at home amid the COVID-19 pandemic. But speeding at extreme speeds has increased, Livingston said. “By driving at safe speeds, drivers can help ease the burden on police and health resources so they can focus on COVID-19,” Livingston said in the statement.

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