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Technology Australia unveils its plan to force Google and Facebook to pay the media

15:20  31 july  2020
15:20  31 july  2020 Source:   20minutes.fr

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Australia 's biggest media companies have lobbied hard for the proposal. It was a "watershed moment" in efforts to end Facebook has previously suggested it could remove Australian news from its platform if such requirements were imposed - arguing the cost to its business would be negligible.

Australia will force Facebook Inc and Alphabet Inc’s Google to pay Australian media outlets for news content, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said on Friday. Australia will become the first country to require Facebook and Google to pay for news content. Both companies have spent years fending off

An initiative that should be opposed by the tech giants

Josh Frydenberg, Ministre des finances australien a ce vendredi rendu public un projet de loi visant à contraindre Google et Facebook à rémunérer les médias pour leurs contenus © NEWS CHINA Josh Frydenberg, Australian Minister of Finance on Friday released a project to law to force Google and Facebook to pay media for their content SOCIAL NETWORKS - An initiative that should be fought by the tech giants

"It is nothing less than the future of the Australian media landscape which is at stake with these changes, ”Australian Finance Minister Josh Frydenberg said at a press conference as Australia unveiled its bill on Friday to force Google and Facebook to pay the media for their content.

A "binding code of conduct"

Josh Frydenberg has made public this "binding code of conduct" supposed to govern relations between media in great financial difficulty and the giants that dominate the Internet, after 18 months of negotiations that failed did not bring the two parties together.

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Australia plans to force Google and Facebook to pay when they recycle local media content. Canberra says its lever will be fair competition rules rather Australian Treasurer Josh Frydenberg switched tack Monday in his long campaign to force digital giants to pay : He declared there had been

Australia will become the first country to require Facebook and Google to pay for news content provided by media companies under a royalty-style system that will become law this year, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said. " It ' s about a fair go for Australian news media businesses. It ' s about ensuring

In addition to the obligation to pay in exchange for content, the code deals with issues such as access to user data, the transparency of algorithms and the order in which content appears in the information flows of the platforms and the results research.

Frydenberg said the bill would be presented to parliament in the coming weeks and would include "significant penalties" which if violated would cost affected groups hundreds of millions of dollars.

Media suffering since the health crisis

The code will eventually apply to any digital platform using content from Australian media, but it will initially focus on Facebook and Google, two of the richest companies and most powerful in the world.

The Australian initiative is being followed closely around the world at a time when the media is suffering in a digital economy where ad revenue is increasingly captured by Facebook, Google and other large tech firms.

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(Adds details about how Australia plans to require Facebook and Google to pay for news content). SYDNEY, July 31 (Reuters) - Australia will force Facebook Inc FB.O and Alphabet Inc's GOOGL.O Google to pay Australian media outlets for news content, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg

Australia will force Facebook Inc and Alphabet Inc's Google to share advertising revenue with local media firms, the country's treasurer said on The government scrapped its initial plan to come up with a voluntary code by November and has asked ACCC to submit its draft mandatory code by July

The media crisis has been made worse by the economic collapse caused by the coronavirus pandemic. In Australia dozens of newspapers have been closed and hundreds of journalists sacked in recent months.

Facebook and Google hostile

Facebook and Google are strongly opposed to any measure that would force them to share advertising revenue. They hinted that if mandatory payments were introduced they could simply boycott the Australian media.

But the Australian minister warned that the future code would prohibit any "discrimination" against the Australian media on the part of these companies. “Today’s bill will attract the attention of many regulatory agencies and governments around the world,” he predicted.

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