•   
  •   
  •   

Technology NASA releases new images of raging storm on Jupiter

18:36  13 july  2017
18:36  13 july  2017 Source:   afp.com

19 of the coolest images from NASA's Operation IceBridge

  19 of the coolest images from NASA's Operation IceBridge An image of the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Twin Otter passing underneath the P-3, captured by Operation IceBridge’s high-resolution camera. In 2009, NASA’s Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) stopped taking pictures after six years in orbit. ICESat-2 wasn't going to pick up the slack until 2015—and the project has since been delayed until 2018. That's a long time in the life of Earth’s rapidly changing polar regions, where ice is changing in thickness and span with troubling speed.

The Great Red Spot on Jupiter, taken by the Juno Spacecraft on its flyby over the storm on July 11, 2017 © Provided by AFP The Great Red Spot on Jupiter, taken by the Juno Spacecraft on its flyby over the storm on July 11, 2017 NASA on Wednesday released a series of stunning images of a raging storm on Jupiter, known as the Great Red Spot, snapped earlier this week as an unmanned probe zipped by.

The US space agency's Juno spacecraft flew over the storm late Monday, offering humanity's closest look yet at the iconic feature of our solar system's largest planet.

"For hundreds of years scientists have been observing, wondering and theorizing about Jupiter's Great Red Spot," said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

Jupiter Is Much Stranger Than Scientists Thought

  Jupiter Is Much Stranger Than Scientists Thought The Juno spacecraft has made several close flybys of the gas giant, revealing massive cyclones—and other weird features beneath its surface.

"Now we have the best pictures ever."

The pictures can be viewed at: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing

This picture released by NASA shows the Great Red Spot on Jupiter -- one of a number of breathtaking images taken by the Juno Spacecraft on a July 11 flyby of the solar system's largest planet © Provided by AFP This picture released by NASA shows the Great Red Spot on Jupiter -- one of a number of breathtaking images taken by the Juno Spacecraft on a July 11 flyby of the solar system's largest planet Scientists hope to learn more about what drives the storm, and Bolton said it would take some time to analyze the data captured by Juno's eight instruments as it passed over the tempest a height of 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers).

The Great Red Spot measured 10,159 miles (16,350 kilometers) wide on April 3 of this year, which is 1.3 times the size of the Earth.

It has been monitored since 1830 and has possibly existed for more than 350 years.

The search for a habitable second Earth

  The search for a habitable second Earth We’ve never had a better chance of finding extraterrestrial life -- if it exists.Scientists are torn on whether extraterrestrial life is abundant, rare or nonexistent. With 300 billion stars in the Milky Way, the late astronomer and futurist Carl Sagan figured there could be up to 10,000 advanced civilizations in our galaxy alone. Others, however, think not only are habitable planets rarer than thought, the odds of life forming are slight even on a promising world. In other words, we might be completely alone in our galaxy or even the universe.

Juno launched in 2011 and began orbiting Jupiter last year. Its next flyby is planned for early September.

"These highly-anticipated images of Jupiter's Great Red Spot are the 'perfect storm' of art and science," said Jim Green, NASA's director of planetary science.

"We are pleased to share the beauty and excitement of space science with everyone."

NASA Juno spacecraft photo of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter: The Great Red Spot on Jupiter is shown in this NASA Juno spacecraft photo released on July 12, 2017. Courtesy NASA/Handout via Close-up of Jupiter

NASA is looking for volunteers who will solve a very unusual task .
© Provided by Business Insider Inc NASA The US space agency Nasa is taking unusual approaches to developing radiation shields. With the help of crowdsourcing, she wants to develop origami-inspired, foldable radiation protection shields with which spaceships and astronauts are to be protected while traveling into the depths of space. From July 26, design proposals can be submitted via the Freelancer.com website.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!