Weekend Reads: Chaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters - PressFrom - Canada
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Weekend ReadsChaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters

20:21  13 august  2019
20:21  13 august  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

Police called in as groups of pro-Hong Kong, China protesters clash in Toronto

Police called in as groups of pro-Hong Kong, China protesters clash in Toronto Police were called in to help maintain order as thousands of protesters gathered in Toronto Saturday in support of Hong Kong’s months-long, citywide uprising calling for democratic reform. Gloria Fung, president of Canada-Hong Kong Link, says her group joined with Toronto Hong Kongers Alliance to organize a march outside Toronto's Old City Hall. Fung said they did not expect pro-China protesters to show up as well. She accused them of "intimidation" and "harassment.

Hong Kong police clashed with protesters on Monday as demonstrations stretched into their 10th week of rallies. Police made several arrests as tear-gas

Pro-democracy protests rocking Hong Kong are growing increasingly violent, with footage emerging of police chasing protesters into a subway station over the

Chaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters© Thomas Peter/Reuters Antigovernment protesters and the police clashed on Tuesday at Hong Kong’s airport, one of the world’s busiest transportation hubs.

HONG KONG — Bearing batons and pepper spray, Hong Kong riot police officers clashed with anti-government protesters who crippled the airport on Tuesday for the second straight day, chaos that underscored the deepening unrest gripping the city.

The mayhem at the airport — unprecedented in the Asian financial hub known for efficiency and order — came hours after mass protests forced the airport to suspend check-ins for the second consecutive day. The city’s embattled leader, Carrie Lam, had pleaded earlier for order after days of escalating street violence.

Police step in as pro-Beijing protesters show up at Calgary rally in support of Hong Kong

Police step in as pro-Beijing protesters show up at Calgary rally in support of Hong Kong Police stepped in to maintain order in Calgary on Saturday as pro-Hong Kong and pro-Beijing protesters faced off. Dozens met for a rally in Crescent Heights in support of pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong who have been met with police violence during Chinese-government crackdowns in the region.

HONG KONG — Anti-government protesters brought chaos to Hong Kong ’ s airport for a second consecutive day Tuesday, forcing airlines to suspend check-in for departing flights, as demonstrators extended their standoff with authorities who have been unable to quell months of dissent.

Live updates as police withdraw from Hong Kong ' s airport after attempting to disperse protesters who have grounded flights. Watch live as violent clashes erupt between riot police and protesters who are sitting in at Hong Kong ' s airport .

Thousands of demonstrators had occupied parts of Hong Kong International Airport’s departures and arrivals halls on Tuesday afternoon, with some using luggage trolleys to block travelers from reaching their departure gates. The Hong Kong Airport Authority later closed check-in services and advised all passengers to leave as soon as possible.

Chaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters© Thomas Peter/Reuters Chief Executive Carrie Lam emerging from behind police barriers that surround her office, in Hong Kong on Tuesday.

Monday was the first day that demonstrators had seriously disrupted operations at the airport, one of the world’s busiest, and another sign that the two-month-old protest movement is turning to increasingly desperate measures, amid threats from Beijing and the refusal of Ms. Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, to meet their demands.

Montrealers rally in solidarity with Hong Kong demonstrators

Montrealers rally in solidarity with Hong Kong demonstrators Dozens of people dressed fully in black held a public demonstration at the foot of Mount Royal on Saturday afternoon, to express solidarity with the massive pro-democracy protests taking place in Hong Kong. “We want the people in Hong Kong to know that they are not alone,” said Guy Ho, a rally participant who first arrived to Canada over 40 years ago. “We are standing with them, even though we’re on the other side of the world.” At the rally,

AIRPORT authorities in Hong Kong have cancelled all remaining flights today after protesters swarmed the main terminal. Man-Kei Tam, director of Amnesty International Hong Kong , said: “ Clashes between protesters and police over the weekend escalated to another level especially on

Read More. Hong Kong airport flights cancelled as protesters clash with police in streets. The Vamps were caught up in the protests at the airport as James McVey and Brad Simpson told Good Morning Britain that they had been stranded in the airport for 24 hours and had been forced to alter

The clashes began late in the evening when police vans arrived outside the departures hall, which was full of black-clad protesters. Some of the protesters went outside, blocked the vans with makeshift blockades and threw plastic bottles at them.

Minutes later, some of the officers began running after the protesters outside the terminal, wrestling some to the ground with batons. As midnight neared, thousands of protesters were still in the airport, while bewildered travelers, fresh off arriving flights, walked past them and into the sweltering night.

The protesters at the airport on Tuesday were particularly angered by the tactics used by the police against demonstrators on Sunday, including firing tear gas into a train station and sending officers into crowds dressed as demonstrators to make arrests. With tensions running high at the airport late Tuesday, a group of demonstrators surrounded and attacked a man they accused of being a mainland Chinese police officer impersonating a protester, causing him to faint.

14-year-old heading home to Vancouver from Hong Kong forced to dodge violence

14-year-old heading home to Vancouver from Hong Kong forced to dodge violence A 14-year-old Vancouver boy finally reached home Wednesday, after a 48-hour delay and narrowly avoiding getting caught up in the violence at the Hong Kong airport. “He saw everything,” said Edward Yuen, describing how his son, Ernest, just missed catching the last Cathay Pacific flight out of Hong Kong on Monday while waiting for a flight attendant to escort him. He then tried to fly on Tuesday when a few flights were allowed to leave, but had to flee the airport as riot police entered and clashed violently with protesters.

Hong Kong police clashed with protesters on Monday as demonstrations stretched into their 10th week of rallies. Police made several arrests as tear-gas smoke filled the air at Hong Kong ’ s Taikoo Mass Transit Railway station. READ MORE: on.rt.com/9zrx.

Back on Hong Kong Island, protesters have mostly left Sheung Wan, where police earlier fired In a video circulated online, chaos was seen in a train carriage as passengers screamed and ran for Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam visits a Tai Po hospital on July 15 to see a police officer

Hong Kong is facing its worst political crisis since the former British colony returned to Chinese rule in 1997 as a semiautonomous territory. The intensifying unrest this month has stoked widespread anxiety in the financial hub, in part because Beijing has started to warn protesters in increasingly strident terms to stand down or face consequences.

Chaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters© Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times Some demonstrators used luggage trolleys to stop passengers from reaching their departure gates.

As of Tuesday night, arriving flights were still scheduled, along with some departures, apparently for passengers who had managed to clear immigration before check-in closed. But Cathay Pacific Airways, Hong Kong’s flag carrier, told its customers to postpone “nonessential travel” out of the city for the rest of the day and on Wednesday.

Demonstrators had staged a days-long sit-in in the arrivals hall over the weekend that did not noticeably disrupt services.

On Tuesday, the United Nations’ human rights chief, Michelle Bachelet, said there was evidence that the Hong Kong police had violated international standards for the use of less-lethal weapons like tear gas.

'People are actually scared': Hong Kongers in Canada watch nervously as tensions simmer back home

'People are actually scared': Hong Kongers in Canada watch nervously as tensions simmer back home With tensions simmering in Hong Kong, many with a connection to the city in Canada are watching nervously as pro-democracy protesters resist what they fear is the tightening grip of the Chinese government. Canada is home to thousands of people of Hong Kong descent, with many feeling helpless as they watch police and protesters clash. But in their own way, some are also organizing to express solidarity with the protesters through rallies and demonstrations half a world away. "That's not the Hong Kong that we grew up with," said Mimi Lee in Toronto. "Police should be protecting citizens and now they are not.

Hong Kong protesters clashed with police on Saturday in a town near the boundary with Protesters threw umbrellas and hardhats at police , who retaliated by swinging batons and firing pepper spray. "Our lovely town has become chaos ," said Ryan Lai, 50, a resident of Sheung Shui, where

Hong Kong police and protesters clashed in cat-and-mouse encounters across the city, marking a shift in tactics during a tenth straight weekend of unrest in the former British colony where many are chafing at Chinese rule.

In a news conference with combative reporters on Tuesday morning, Hong Kong’s leader, Carrie Lam, urged protesters to obey the law.

“The stability and well-being of seven million people are in jeopardy,” Mrs. Lam said, her voice breaking slightly. “Take a minute to think about that. Look at our city, our home. Do we really want to push our home to the abyss where it will be smashed into pieces?”

During street clashes this summer, the Hong Kong police have regularly fired tear gas, rubber bullets and bean bag rounds to disperse protesters, even in residential areas and crowded shopping districts. On Sunday night, in addition to using tear gas in a train station, the police beat protesters and chased some down an escalator at another station.

Chaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters© Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times Protesters held signs and handed leaflets to arriving travelers.

The authorities, for their part, accused protesters of attacking officers with bricks and gasoline bombs.

[Here’s a guide to what prompted the Hong Kong protests and how they evolved.]

On Tuesday, Mrs. Lam was frequently interrupted by journalists who demanded an explanation for what protesters have called blatant police misconduct. She looked more visibly emotional than she has at other recent public appearances.

“Will you apologize to the girl?” one reporter asked, referring to a woman who was hit in her right eye on Sunday, apparently by a projectile fired by police officers, during the city’s 10th straight weekend of mass demonstrations.

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly OTTAWA — Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland is condemning violence in Hong Kong as tension escalates between pro-democracy protesters and police. She made the remarks in a joint statement issued Saturday with her counterpart in the European Union, Federica Mogherini. The statement says that both Canada and the EU support Hong Kong's "high degree of autonomy" within China, as well as its residents' right to peaceful assembly. But they are urging restraint in the wake of "a rising number of unacceptable violent incidents.

Hong Kong police fired volleys of tear gas to disperse pro-democracy protests on Sunday and baton-charged the crowd blocking a key road in the government

Metro stations in Hong Kong resumed regular service on Monday and streets were being cleaned of debris as the city recovered from another night of Ramping up the use of force against protesters , police fired volleys of tear gas at protesters across the territory on Sunday and staged baton charges

“Why have you never condemned the police?” another asked.

Chaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters© Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times The Hong Kong Airport Authority said operations had been “seriously disrupted.”

Toward the end of the briefing, Mrs. Lam said that police operations were not determined by “someone like myself, who is outside the police.”

Also on Tuesday, medical professionals held rallies at several local hospitals against the police’s tactics and in solidarity with the woman who was hit in the eye on Sunday. The Hong Kong newspaper Apple Daily reported that the injured woman is a veterinary nurse.

The rallies are a “direct response to what happened on Sunday,” Dr. Alfred Wong, a cardiologist who works at Tuen Mun hospital in northwest Hong Kong, said at a gathering there that drew several hundred of his colleagues.

The wave of protests began in early June, in opposition to legislation that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China, where the courts are controlled by the Communist Party.

[Read how the protests have put Hong Kong on a collision course with the Communist Party.]

They have since morphed into calls for more direct elections, a call for Mrs. Lam to resign and an investigation of the police, among other demands.

Beijing, which views the unrest as a direct challenge to its authority, has warned the protesters to stop and has leaned on Hong Kong’s political and business elite to close ranks behind Mrs. Lam, a career civil servant.

Much of the pressure on the business community has focused in recent days on Cathay Pacific, one of the territory’s best-known international brands. The Chinese government has forced it to bar staffers who support or participate in the protests from doing any work involving flights to mainland China.

Canada upgrades travel warning as Hong Kong protests take over airport

Canada upgrades travel warning as Hong Kong protests take over airport Canada upgrades travel warning as Hong Kong protests take over airport

Protesters crowded the airport at Hong Kong . AP. Protesters returned to the airport on Monday in response to an increasingly aggressive Another 40 were taken to hospital following clashes on Sunday night which saw police let off tear gas in an underground train station, according to local media.

@flyspicejet Hong Kong down with protests . International airport closed. Demonstrations in full swing in Hong Kong . " Hong Kong ' s radical demonstrators have repeatedly used extremely dangerous tools to attack police officers, which already constitutes a serious violent crime, and also shows the

On Tuesday afternoon, Rupert Hogg, the airline’s chief executive, warned employees against participating in Tuesday’s airport demonstration because it was not sanctioned by the government.

“It is important that you do not support or participate in this protest,” Mr. Hogg said in an internal email. “Again, we would be concerned about your safety if this protest becomes disorderly or violent.” Cathay also said on Tuesday that it had suspended an officer for misusing company information the day before.

As if to eliminate any possible ambiguity about the airline’s stance on the unrest, Cathay’s largest shareholder, the Hong Kong-based conglomerate Swire Pacific, issued a statement on Tuesday condemning “all illegal activities and violent behavior.”

So far, the disruptions have not affected cargo flights in or out of Hong Kong’s airport, which handles more cargo traffic than any other airport in the world. But more and more airfreight is carried nowadays in the bellies of wide-body passenger planes, and these shipments have invariably been disrupted.

On Tuesday, the Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute released the results of a public survey showing that Mrs. Lam’s popularity rating in early August had reached a record low for any chief executive.

But Dixon Ming, a researcher at the institute, told reporters that the protesters could also lose public trust if they continued to target the city’s public transit system.

The continued disruptions at the airport on Tuesday left some travelers frustrated and angry. Some described themselves as supporters of the protest movement who had grown disillusioned with it.

“Why are you not letting me in?” one traveler told a group of protesters outside an entrance to the airport’s departure gates, video footage showed. “I support you, but I think your strategy is wrong.”

Maisa Sodebayashi, a Brazilian who works in a car factory in Japan, said on Monday afternoon that she had been stranded in the airport for about 24 hours and counting, after landing there on a connecting flight to Rio de Janeiro.

Ms. Sodebayashi, 32, said that while she understood the protesters were fighting for democracy, she also wanted to go home.

“Honestly, I don’t know what to do,” she said, standing beside a customer service desk.

Reporting was contributed by Raymond Zhong, Austin Ramzy, Gillian Wong, Katherine Li, David Moll and Daniel Victor from Hong Kong, and Nick Cumming-Bruce from Geneva. Elsie Chen contributed research.

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly.
OTTAWA — Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland has condemned violence in Hong Kong amid escalating tension between pro-democracy protesters and police. She made the remarks in a joint statement issued Saturday with her counterpart in the European Union, Federica Mogherini. The statement says that both Canada and the EU support Hong Kong's "high degree of autonomy" within China, as well as its residents' right to peaceful assembly. But they are urging restraint in the wake of "a rising number of unacceptable violent incidents.

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