Weekend Reads: Japan will have to dump radioactive Fukushima water into Pacific, minister says - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

Weekend ReadsJapan will have to dump radioactive Fukushima water into Pacific, minister says

10:05  10 september  2019
10:05  10 september  2019 Source:   reuters.com

Cathay Pacific Chairman Slosar resigns, to be replaced by Swire executive

Cathay Pacific Chairman Slosar resigns, to be replaced by Swire executive Cathay Pacific Chairman Slosar resigns, to be replaced by Swire executive

Japan ’s environment minister says the water will need to be dumped . Tokyo Electric Power will have to dump radioactive water from its destroyed Fukushima nuclear power plant directly into the Pacific ocean, Japan ’s environment minister said on Tuesday.

The operator of Japan 's paralyzed nuclear plant in Fukushima has decided to release radioactive tritium into the Pacific Ocean. Kanji Tachiya, a fishing cooperative chief, told Kyodo News the release of radioactive water will "create a new wave of unfounded rumors" that will affect business.

Japan will have to dump radioactive Fukushima water into Pacific, minister says© Reuters/ISSEI KATO FILE PHOTO: Storage tanks for radioactive water are seen at tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Okuma

TOKYO (Reuters) - Tokyo Electric Power will have to dump radioactive water from its destroyed Fukushima nuclear power plant directly into the Pacific Ocean, Japan's environment minister said on Tuesday.

After the plant was crippled by an earthquake and tsunami in 2011, Tokyo Electric, or Tepco, has collected in tanks at the wrecked sites more than 1 million tons of contaminated water from the cooling pipes used to keep fuel cores from melting.

The utility says it will run out of space by 2022.

Scientists monitoring new marine heat wave off B.C. coast similar to 'The Blob'

Scientists monitoring new marine heat wave off B.C. coast similar to 'The Blob' A new marine heat wave spreading across a portion of the Pacific Ocean off the coast of British Columbia is on track to become the second largest of its kind in the last 40 years, according to officials in the United States.

The Fukushima Daiichi plant's manager, Akira Ono, said the firm had no plans to release contaminated water into the Pacific , but agreed that decommissioning Fukushima three years on. For visitors and workers alike, the journey to the plant begins at J-Village, a former training complex for the Japanese

Japan ’s nuclear watchdog says the radioactive water that has accumulated at the battered Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant must be “We have to dispose of the water ,” Shunichi Tanaka, chairman of the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA), told a media conference after visiting

"The only option will be to drain it into the sea and dilute it," Yoshiaki Harada told a news briefing in the capital. "The whole of the government will discuss this, but I would like to offer my simple opinion."

A final government decision on disposing of the tainted water awaits a report from an expert panel.

Harada did not say how much water would need to be put into the ocean.

Tepco officials were not immediately available for comment.

Any green light to dump the waste into the sea, however, could anger neighbors such as South Korea, which summoned a senior Japanese embassy official last month to explain how the country would deal with the Fukushima water.

Ties between the East Asian nations are already at a low ebb following a compensation dispute over Koreans forced to work in Japanese factories in World War Two.

Coastal nuclear plants commonly dump into the ocean water that contains tritium, an isotope of hydrogen that is hard to separate and is considered to be relatively harmless.

Tepco, which also faces opposition from local fishermen, admitted last year that the water in its tanks still contained contaminants beside tritium.

(Reporting by Tim Kelly; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Osaka reaches quarterfinals at Pan Pacific Open.
OSAKA, Japan — Top-seeded Naomi Osaka reached the quarterfinals at the Pan Pacific Open by beating qualifier Viktoriya Tomova 7-5, 6-3 on Wednesday. Osaka, who was broken twice early in the match, is looking to win her first title in her hometown after finishing runner-up in 2016 and 2018. She will next meet either Yulia Putintseva or Russian qualifier Varvara Flink. Also, fourth-seeded Angelique Kerber won her first match since Wimbledon, beating American qualifier Nicole Gibbs 6-2, 6-4. "The goal now is to finish the year as well as I can, to put all the energy which I have into this run in Asia and to play well in the next few weeks," Kerber said.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!