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Weekend Reads Turkey: Recep Erdogan insults Emmanuel Macron and urges him to use “common sense”

15:43  17 september  2020
15:43  17 september  2020 Source:   ouest-france.fr

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Erdogan and French President Emmanuel Macron have traded barbs for weeks over the issue – Turkey accusing the French leader of arrogance and despair after he called for a tough EU stance. France also angered Turkey by sending fighter jets and vessels to the region in support of Greece.

Emmanuel Macron (@ EmmanuelMacron ). La situation en Méditerranée orientale est Last month Macron called for EU sanctions against Turkey for what he described as “violations” of Greek and “Despite all this, we want to believe that common sense will prevail … it should be known that our

Turquie : Recep Erdogan insulte Emmanuel Macron et l’exhorte à faire preuve de “bon sens” © Geert Vanden Wijngaert / Bloomberg via Getty Images Turkey: Recep Erdogan insults Emmanuel Macron and urges him to use “common sense” ” The President of Turkey Recep Erdogan judged that Emmanuel Macron was an" ambitious incapable "and responsible for" disorder "in the Eastern Mediterranean, a region rich in gas very disputed ... The French president supports Greece in his arm of iron with Turkey.

Decidedly, Recep Tayyip Erdogan does not seem to carry Emmanuel Macron in his heart ... After having estimated that the French president had colonial aims in Lebanon and played the caïds in the eastern Mediterranean ( an area rich in gas fields but hotly contested with Greece and other countries), he qualified on Thursday as "ambitious incapable" because of his firm support for Athens in the gas crisis against Turkey. During a video conference with the local leaders of his party, the Turkish president justified his strong foreign policy and attacked the French head of state in particular, who recently increased criticism against him.

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Erdogan and French President Emmanuel Macron have traded barbs for weeks over the issue -- Turkey accusing the French leader of arrogance and despair after he called for a tough EU stance. France also angered Turkey by sending fighter jets and vessels to the region in support of Greece.

NNA - Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan Thursday said France was being led by an "incapable" president as he stepped up his personal feud with Emmanuel Macron . Erdogan and Macron have traded insults for months after finding themselves on opposite sides of conflicts ranging

"Why is Turkey in Syria, in Libya, in the Eastern Mediterranean, some wonder. (...) If Turkey gives up everything, could France get rid of the disorder that the ambitious incapable who directs provoked and embrace a policy of common sense? ”he said. Relations between Paris and Ankara have deteriorated considerably in recent weeks due to the support given by France to Greece in the conflict between it and Turkey in the eastern Mediterranean.

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Turkey is claiming the right to exploit hydrocarbon deposits in a maritime area which Athens considers to fall under its sovereignty. The two countries have shown their muscles with martial declarations, military maneuvers and shipments of ships to the area. France has clearly shown its support for Greece by deploying warships and fighter jets in the region, an initiative strongly denounced by the Turkish president.

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Moscow has dismissed a report by Parisian newspaper Le Monde claiming President Vladimir Putin told his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron that Russian “internet troublemaker” Alexey Navalny may have poisoned himself.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday warned Germany against the adoption of a He hailed the two countries' ties as being "at the highest level" but said Turkey would consider "We will do the necessary evaluation after the vote," Erdogan said. But he added: "I want you to know that

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The tone between the two countries rose last week when the French head of state declared that "the Turkish people who is a great people deserve something else, ”in an apparent allusion to the actions of the Turkish government and their consequences.

Mr. Erdogan also accused Thursday the countries of the region and the European Union to set "the traps" towards Turkey and to have their own "calculations" concerning the region. “With the support of our nation, we will continue to do what is good, just and beneficial for our country,” he said.

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In France, the pandemic deepens the political divide as death toll continues to rise .
In, France the pandemic has become political. Seen from Paris, the COVID-19 virus is on the point of spinning exponentially into disaster. Seen from the south, specifically from France's third largest city, Marseille, it feels like "an affront," in the words of the city's deputy mayor. That's because the national government in Paris decreed on Wednesday that, as of Saturday, all cafés, restaurants and bars in the Marseille-Aix-en-Provence region would have to close. The region is now classed by the government as a "maximum alert zone," a new category two steps up from the previous "red zone" category.

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