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Weekend Reads 'No truth' to story Bruce McArthur cannibalized victims, detective says

01:05  04 february  2018
01:05  04 february  2018 Source:   cbc.ca

Bruce McArthur murder investigation unusual with missing bodies, expert says

  Bruce McArthur murder investigation unusual with missing bodies, expert says An organized killer is one who leaves no body behind — making a murder investigation all the more challenging for police and prosecutors, an expert says. Thomas Hargrove, founder and chairman of the U.S.-based Murder Accountability Project, told the Star that an unrecovered body, or bodies, “speaks to a very organized killer.” Hargrove spoke to the Star on Wednesday, several days after the arrest of Bruce McArthur, 66, who has been charged with two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Andrew Kinsman, 49, and Selim Esen, 44. The bodies of Kinsman and Esen have not been found. At a news conference last Thursday, police said they believe there are more victims. Hargrove said there are both organized and disorganized killers, with disorganized killers tending to be more opportunistic and “they kill when they can.” “Often they don’t own cars because nobody would sell them a car or allow them to have a driver’s licence.” Disorganized killers disproportionately have mental illness or mental challenges, he added. But organized killers are different, Hargrove explained. “They plan. They look for victims — they can still be opportunistic — but they look for particular victims and they make a plan to avoid detection and capture.” Hargrove described murder investigations where no body has been found as “devilishly hard to solve.” The murder charges against McArthur haven’t been tested in court. “It’ll be a difficult case to get a conviction on.

a fire truck parked in a parking lot: Toronto police were at a home on Mallory Crescent in Leaside Saturday to continue investigating the Bruce McArthur case.© James Morrison-Collalto/CBC Toronto police were at a home on Mallory Crescent in Leaside Saturday to continue investigating the Bruce McArthur case.

Forensic pathologists are sifting through the contents of at least 15 planters in connection with the Bruce McArthur case, the lead investigator confirmed, as police continued their work Saturday at a property in Toronto where human remains were found.

Det.-Sgt. Hank Idsinga told CBC Toronto Saturday that human remains may not be found in all of the planters. "But we have seized anything that the canine units have hit on," he said in an email.

Idsinga also refuted a story published at an online gossip site suggesting that McArthur may have cannibalized the alleged victims.

Bruce McArthur was barred from Gay Village as part of sentence for 2001 assault

  Bruce McArthur was barred from Gay Village as part of sentence for 2001 assault Bruce McArthur was barred from Gay Village as part of sentence for 2001 assault Bruce McArthur was barred from an area that included the city’s Gay Village and prohibited from spending time with male prostitutes as part of the conditional sentence he received for assaulting a man with a metal pipe almost 15 years ago.McArthur, 66, is now facing charges of first degree murder in the disappearances of Andrew Kinsman and Selim Esen, both gay men, from the Church and Wellesley area last year. Police believe there are more victims.

"There's no truth to that at all," he said in his email when asked about the report at Radaronline.com.

Also Saturday, police were back at the home on Mallory Crescent, from which they've removed bags of items in addition to planters as they probe the case of accused killer McArthur, who stands charged with five counts of first-degree murder in connection with the disappearances of Andrew Kinsman, Selim Esen, Dean Lisowick, Majeed Kayhan and Soroush Mahmudi.

a man sitting at a table in a restaurant: Bruce McArthur, 66, is accused of killing five men, and police believe there may be more victims.© Bruce McArthur/Facebook Bruce McArthur, 66, is accused of killing five men, and police believe there may be more victims.

McArthur, 66, a Toronto-based landscaper, worked and stored tools at the Leaside home.

Police were at the home over the last few days with sniffer dogs and ground-penetrating radar in an effort to identify areas that could be excavated as they continue their search for human remains.

What we know so far about Bruce McArthur

  What we know so far about Bruce McArthur Toronto police are calling the case ‘unprecedented,’ and the likes of which Toronto has never seen , alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur has been charged with five counts of first-degree murder.READ MORE: Are police doing enough to find missing people in Toronto’s Gay Village?Here is what we know so far about the man at the centre of this case: Bruce McArthur was first arrested and charged with two counts of first-degree murder on Jan. 18 in connection with the disappearance of Andrew Kinsman and Selim Esen, both reported missing from the Church and Wellesley streets area at separate times last year.

Police were also warming the ground in order to do whatever excavation work is deemed necessary.

Earlier in the week, Idsinga reiterated his belief that there are more victims and that he expects more charges to be laid against McArthur.

Investigators were searching more than 30 properties where McArthur may have worked, including some in Peel, York and Durham regions.

But, Idsinga said, it could take months for all skeletal remains that are found to be identified.

No more human remains in search for serial killer victims at Leaside home .
No human remains have been found buried in the backyard of a Leaside home where the remains of at least six individuals were discovered in planter pots, Toronto police said Tuesday.A garage at the house, which is owned by Karen Fraser and Ron Smith, was used by Bruce McArthur to store his landscaping equipment. McArthur, 66, has been charged with five counts of first-degree murder in the disappearances of Andrew Kinsman, Selim Esen, Majeed Kayhan, Soroush Mahmudi and Dean Lisowick. Police have described the deaths as the work of a serial killer.

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