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Health & Fit Dentists say they support limits on opioid prescriptions

19:35  26 march  2018
19:35  26 march  2018 Source:   cbsnews.com

These Americans are most likely to receive opioid prescriptions

  These Americans are most likely to receive opioid prescriptions New data from the CDC shed more light on the nationwide opioid epidemic About half of adults with a disability receiving Medicare benefits received at least one opioid prescription in a year, and they’re more likely to be from the suburbs, small cities or rural areas.Opioid prescriptions were highest in places with lower median household incomes and higher unemployment rates and those aged 55 to 64 years old rather than younger Americans, according to research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which analyzed data of almost 3.

But the American Dental Association has now released a new policy saying they now support statutory limits of seven days for dental opioid prescriptions . CDC data shows that the overall national opioid prescribing rate declined from 2012 to 2016. " Dentists are the number one opioid

Older Americans Support Limits on Opioid Prescriptions . University of Michigan/AARP poll finds doctors aren’t explaining the addiction risks of More than 1 in 4 older adults (29 percent) said they filled a prescription for an opioid medication in the past two years, most for arthritis-related pain

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, opioids killed more than 42,000 people in 2016.: opiods-pills-and-bottle-promo.jpg © CBS News opiods-pills-and-bottle-promo.jpg

During the time when opioid prescriptions were declining across the board nationwide, dental prescriptions were on the rise, according to a new study published Monday in the Journal of the American Dental Association.

But the American Dental Association has now released a new policy saying they now support statutory limits of seven days for dental opioid prescriptions. These limits have not been embraced by the largest organization of doctors – the American Medical Association – which has so far resisted opioid prescription limits.

"As president of the ADA, I call upon dentists everywhere to double down on their efforts to prevent opioids from harming our patients and their families," said ADA President Joseph P. Crowley, D.D.S. "This new policy demonstrates ADA's firm commitment to help fight the country's opioid epidemic while continuing to help patients manage dental pain."

Study Shows Opioid Prescriptions Come From Doctor Offices, Not Emergency Rooms

  Study Shows Opioid Prescriptions Come From Doctor Offices, Not Emergency Rooms A new study shows where people are getting their opioid prescriptions from.A new study from the University of Southern California showed that opioid prescriptions very rarely come from emergency rooms, but are almost entirely written in doctor’s offices.

Some prescription opioids are made from the plant directly, and others are made by scientists in labs using the same chemical structure. Prescription opioids are used mostly to treat moderate to severe pain, though some opioids can be used to treat coughing and diarrhea.

Thus, placing further limits on opioid prescribing across the board would only serve to further narrow the options chronic pain patients have to MassHealth maintained that the new limits are appropriate for maintaining a balance between access to opioids for pain management and patient safety.

"Limiting quantity as opposed to duration would have been better," said Dr. Andrew Kolodny, Co-Director of the Opioid Policy Research at Brandeis University. But he added, "[The new policy] suggests the dentists are stepping up to the plate. It's a worthwhile effort because overprescribing for acute pain is a big deal." 

The new study shows the increase in dental opioid prescriptions from 2010 to 2015 was sharpest among young people ages 11 to 18 years of age, which is a group known to be at risk for drug addiction. CDC data shows that the overall national opioid prescribing rate declined from 2012 to 2016.

"Dentists are the number one opioid prescriber for adolescents and the prescribing rates were already though the roof," said Kolodny, adding that the crisis was well underway when dental prescriptions were rising, "By 2010 the CDC had already announced the [opioid] epidemic."

Controversial supplement kratom is an opioid, FDA says

  Controversial supplement kratom is an opioid, FDA says Kratom, which is made using an Asian plant, isn’t “just a plant,” the FDA says — it’s an opioid. If it looks like an opioid and acts like an opioid, it’s an opioid.That’s the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s reasoning when it comes to kratom, an Asian plant-based dietary supplement that’s been touted as an aid for opioid withdrawal, pain, anxiety and depression. The regulator analyzed kratom at a molecular level and looked at how it may behave inside the body and affect the brain.

Prescriptions for opioid painkillers have been dropping since 2011, but the trend accelerated last year with a decline of 10 percent from January through December, according to the The declines come amid a flurry of new insurance company policies and state laws setting limits on opioid prescribing .

Dentists say they support limits on opioid prescriptions . New study showing dentist opioid prescriptions rose from 2010-2015 while national trend declined. Supporters of the ban say the flavored products target kids, but adult users worry they will be forced to return to traditional tobacco.

The American Dentists Association is also calling for mandatory continuing education of all dentists and the organization says they support having dentists register with Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs.

Another study also released Monday in the Journal of American Dental Association shows that researchers found that for dental pain, using opioids was "equal if not superior" to Tylenol or ibuprofen. This is in line with another recent study showing that for patients with stubborn backaches or hip or knee arthritis, opioids worked no better than over the counter drugs. 

Opioid manufacturers and distributors are facing an avalanche of lawsuits from states, cities and counties blaming the industry for starting the opioid epidemic.

The latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control indicate 42,000 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016.

Alex Derosier contributed to this story.

Walmart to limit opioid prescriptions at pharmacies amid epidemic .
Walmart Inc. announced Monday the retail giant will begin to restrict opioid prescriptions in an effort to help stem the deadly drug epidemic. Walmart announced Monday the retail giant will begin to restrict opioid prescriptions to help Walmart and Sam’s Club pharmacies are set to limit customers’ opioid prescriptions to a seven-day supply, with up to a 50 morphine milligram equivalent maximum per day, the company said in a news release.

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