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Technology The UK will fine technology companies who fail to protect children

15:50  22 january  2020
15:50  22 january  2020 Source:   engadget.com

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Technology companies that have produced used by children will need to radically redesign their systems after the UK laid down new privacy standards. The general gist is that it will no longer be viable to simply turn a blind eye to children on these services, selling ads off the back of their

Technology companies will be required to assess their sites for sexual abuse risks, prevent self-harm and pro-suicide content, and block children The UK Information Commissioner’s Office, which was tasked with creating regulations to protect children online, will enforce the new rules from autumn

Technology companies that have produced used by children will need to radically redesign their systems after the UK laid down new privacy standards. The Information Commissioner's Office's new code of conduct covers everyone from social media platforms to the makers of internet-connected toys. And failure to comply with the new rules, expected to come into force by 2021, will see hefty fines being meted out.

a young girl standing on a stage

The "Age Appropriate Design Code" has 15 general principles of design that these companies will need to meet in order to protect children. The general gist is that it will no longer be viable to simply turn a blind eye to children on these services, selling ads off the back of their personal data. Instead, the general obligation will be to protect the privacy of these children at the expense of making a quick buck.

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The fine , which represents a drop in the ocean for a company that brought in .7bn (£31.5bn) in global revenue in 2017, was the maximum available to the regulator under old data protection legislation. The fine would inevitably have been significantly higher under the GDPR.

With new rules for technology companies to protect children online announced by the UK Information Commissioner’s Office, we want to hear about the non-mainstream sites children and young people access. From autumn 2021, companies will have to consider 15 principles in order to

These principles include rules on setting privacy protections to the highest possible default and ensuring geolocation is off by standard. If you want to make a GPS-enabled device, you'll need to demonstrate that there's sufficient reason to use location services, and get consent. The rules also prohibit the use of nudge techniques -- making a Yes button bright and green while the No button is hidden in grey below -- to force consent in these cases.

In addition, providers will need to act proactively to hunt down content that could lead to sexual abuse, exploitation and self-harm. Or, at least, to maintain an adequate system of reporting and identification -- and tell users about it -- to ensure that such content isn't rife on the platform. Failure to do so, and to uphold their own stated acceptable use policies, will be treated as a breach of the GDPR.

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Google agreed on Wednesday to pay a record 0 million fine and make changes to protect children ’s privacy on YouTube, as regulators The move is the latest enforcement action taken by regulators in the United States against technology companies for violating users’ privacy, indicating

Young children are protected by a federal law that requires parental consent before companies can collect and share their personal information. YouTube has its own app for children , called YouTube Kids; the company also launched a website version of the service in August.

And in order to ensure that these companies, which lobbied hard against the rules, toe the line, there are hefty penalties for failure. Regulators, when empowered by law, say that they'll take a common-sense approach to upholding the rules. And when they find failures, can dish out fines up to $22.1 million, or 4 percent of turnover, whichever is higher.

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