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USHigh-flying ladybug swarm shows up on National Weather Service radar

17:25  05 june  2019
17:25  05 june  2019 Source:   latimes.com

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A huge blob that appeared on the National Weather Service 's radar wasn't a rain cloud, but a massive swarm of ladybugs over Southern California. Meteorologist Joe Dandrea says the array of bugs appeared to be about 80 miles wide as it flew over San Diego Tuesday. But Dandrea tells the Los

But in reality, the massive blob showing up Tuesday evening on the National Weather Service ’s radar in San Diego County was just a lot of ladybugs . Rather, they’re spread throughout the sky, flying at between 5,000 and 9,000 feet, with the most concentrated mass about 10 miles wide.

High-flying ladybug swarm shows up on National Weather Service radar© Jeff Vendsel / Independent Journal

At first glance, it looks like a rain cloud.

But in reality, the massive blob showing up Tuesday evening on the National Weather Service’s radar in San Diego County was just a lot of ladybugs.

Joe Dandrea, a meteorologist with NWS San Diego, said from the radar, the ladybug bloom appears to be about 80 miles by 80 miles, but the ladybugs aren’t in a concentrated mass that size. Rather, they’re spread throughout the sky, flying at between 5,000 and 9,000 feet, with the most concentrated mass about 10 miles wide.

Tornado and severe weather warning issued for New York City

Tornado and severe weather warning issued for New York City The National Weather Service has issued a tornado warning for parts of New York and New Jersey, as well as Pennsylvania. “Emergency Alert,” read a message sent to surprised New Yorkers by the NWS. “Tornado warning in this area till 9:30 p.m. EDT. Take shelter now.” Severe thunderstorm warnings were in effect for parts of Manhattan, Brooklyn and Staten Island, and John F. Kennedy International Airport reported “flight disruptions” from the severe weather as torrential rains swept the area. In addition the NWS issued a severe thunderstorm warning for eastern Long Island, including Hampton Bays, Riverhead and East Quogue until at least 10:00 p.m.

Spotted: A Swarm Of Ladybugs So Huge, It Showed Up On National Weather Service Radar . A huge blob that appeared on the National Weather Service 's radar wasn't a rain cloud, but a massive swarm of ladybugs over San They were flying about a mile above the ground, she said, in the

But in reality, the massive blob showing up Tuesday evening on the National Weather Service 's radar in San Diego County was just a lot of ladybugs . Joe Dandrea, a meteorologist with NWS San Diego, said from the radar , the ladybug bloom appears to be about 80 miles by 80 miles, but the

After seeing it on the radar, Dandrea called a spotter near Wrightwood in the San Bernardino Mountains to ask what they were seeing.

“I don’t think they’re dense like a cloud,” Dandrea said. “The observer there said you could see little specks flying by.”

California is home to about 200 species of ladybugs, including the convergent lady beetle, according to the University of California Integrated Pest Management Program.

In early spring, after temperatures reach 65 degrees, adult convergent lady beetles mate and migrate from the Sierra Nevada to valley areas where they eat aphids and lay eggs.

In the early summer, once the aphid numbers decline, beetles become hungry and migrate to higher elevations, according to the UC program.

It wasn’t immediately known what type of ladybugs were causing the phenomenon.

But at least it wasn’t locusts.

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