Health & Fitness: 12 myths about anxiety far too many of us still believe - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Health & Fitness 12 myths about anxiety far too many of us still believe

09:50  23 october  2017
09:50  23 october  2017 Source:   netdoctor.co.uk

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Anxiety experts bust myths about the condition. Grappling with anxiety is tough enough without having to worry about everyday misconceptions. One such misunderstanding is that anxiety is uncommon when, in fact, almost five in every 100 people in the UK suffer from the condition.

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12 myths about anxiety far too many of us still believe © Andy Smith / Getty 12 myths about anxiety far too many of us still believe Grappling with anxiety is tough enough without having to worry about everyday misconceptions. One such misunderstanding is that anxiety is uncommon when, in fact, almost five in every 100 people in the UK suffer from the condition. A further nine in every 100 people battle mixed anxiety and depression. 

To bring some clarity to a hazy situation, we spoke to Mike Ward, Panic and Anxiety Specialist and founder of the London and Hampshire Anxiety Clinics, and Dr Monica Cain, counselling psychologist and CBT therapist at Nightingale Hospital:

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Myth 1: Anxiety is caused by a bad experience or stressful ordeal

Reality:Why someone feels anxious is complex – sometimes there might not even be a reason.

Mike says: "We have to be careful we don't put these things in to cause and effect. While a particular experience or level of stress that is deemed too much by the individual can cause anxiety, it's not always the case. Anxiety can be thought of the anticipation of the future, the appraisal of uncertainty and how we judge the uncertainty." 

Myth 2: Anxiety will cause damage to the body

Reality:While anxiety manifests in to physical symptoms, these will fade.

Dr Cain says: "One of the most common myths surrounding anxiety I hear from patients is whether it will do some long term physical damage to the body. Anxiety can have intense physical symptoms such as heart palpitations, rapid breathing and tightness in the chest area. These symptoms are often mistaken for a heart problem, although it is always important to check this out via a medical examination. Research shows that most anxiety attacks last about 20-30 minutes before physical symptoms begin to fade: our bodies simply cannot sustain intense levels of physical arousal for long periods of time. The flight/fight system is a short, sharp arousal to get us quickly out of danger, it will then tail off and we start to feel tired."

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"When we 're anxious we produce more adrenalin and go into what's known as 'fight or flight mode'," says Brotheridge. "The part of the brain called the amygdala becomes more active, in order to try and keep us safe from what we perceive as a 12 myths about anxiety far too many of us still believe .

a woman sitting in front of a window © Provided by National magazine company ltd (Hearst UK)

Myth 3: Anxiety attacks will make you faint

Reality: You may often feel dizzy, but it's unlikely you'll faint.

Dr Cain says: "As the breathing intensifies, we hyperventilate to provide more oxygen for the heart to distribute to the arms and legs. When we hyperventilate, we can often feel dizzy which causes people to think they will faint. In fact, a decrease in blood pressure causes fainting whilst during an anxiety attack there is an increase in blood pressure."

Myth 4: It's obvious when someone has anxiety or an anxiety disorder

Reality: You may be sitting next to someone at work – or even at the dinner table – and have no idea they are suffering.

Mike says: "It will be unique for every individual, many individuals manage their symptoms without others noticing, even for years, and it can go unnoticed by others. Particular behaviours could be noticed – such as, avoidance, reassurance seeking, use of substances and alcohol, or withdrawal from social events. Others may demonstrate the 'typical' physical symptoms associated with anxiety."

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Myth 5: Someone has to suffer panic attacks and other physical symptoms if they have anxiety

Reality: Anxiety manifests in many ways – sometimes this means NO external symptoms.

Mike says: "Some individuals report no physical symptoms, they just report the constant intrusive worrying thoughts. Although, when we begin to bring attention to how the body is part of this, individuals may become aware of how their breathing changes or subtle tensions appear in the muscles when they start to think in a particular way." 

Myth 6: Anxious people should avoid stressful situations

Reality: Confronting fears head on can sometimes dissolve the feelings of anxiety.

Mike says: "Managing anxiety will be very different for each person. Some individuals like to face their fears or phobias and are successful in dissolving the stress or phobia. It is also an opportunity to learn, grow and ask for the appropriate support to learn how to deal with particular situations resourcefully and effectively. Continually avoiding situations and phobias may strengthen the fear."

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Myth 7: Anxiety will just go away

Reality: Anxiety doesn't usually resolve itself. People need support.

Mike says: "It's not ideal to let an anxiety disorder get resolved on its own. Individuals learn how to deal with anxiety in their own way and become accustomed to living in a particular way to manage the symptoms. Although they continue to lead a daily life, the distress of anxiety can be hidden. I would advise people to seek the appropriate support to understand how to deal with their anxiety." 

Myth 8: Telling people that 'the anxious feeling will pass' calms them down

Reality: There are certain phrases you should just avoid.

Mike says: "Others include, 'Just get on with it,' 'Stop worrying,' 'Why don't you just think differently about it,' 'Snap out of it,' 'Don't panic yourself' and 'Remain calm'." 

Myth 9: Medication is a last-resort and should be avoided

Reality: For some people, medication is a useful buffer.

Dr Cain says: "Medication can be very helpful to bring anxiety levels down, so that we can problem solve as well as challenge unrealistic thinking. We start to lose the ability to think clearly and challenge negative automatic thoughts - such as 'catastrophising': if we are continuously experiencing high levels of anxiety."

a little girl sitting on a bed © Provided by National magazine company ltd (Hearst UK)

Myth 10: Anxiety impacts every walk of life

Reality: In severe cases, this could be true. But many people with anxiety are happy, functioning adults.

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Mike says: "Anxiety doesn't always affect a person's whole way of being, it could just be situational and associated to specific events. But, again, it is unique to every individual."

Myth 11: Those suffering from anxiety usually have a nervy disposition

Reality: Nope. You could be confident and outgoing and still experience bouts of anxiety

Mike says: "Many individuals may not have experienced anxiety at all, and then a particular experience could trigger an anxious state. There are particular traits and tendencies of behaviour and thoughts that do add to worry and nervousness – when people are in this mindset they may appear or feel nervous."

Myth 12: People can recover from anxiety

Reality: This is only partially true.

Mike says: "I'm not sure if 'recover' is the right word, but people can reduce and move on from their anxieties. With either the appropriate support and therapeutic interventions or the assistance of medication, individuals can learn how to deal with the anxiety differently."

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