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Health & FitnessAlmost a THIRD of doctors and nurses claim they are not confident enough on sun safety to advise patients how to avoid skin cancer

17:35  06 august  2019
17:35  06 august  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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Almost a third of doctors and nurses do not feel confident enough on sun safety to advise their patients on how to avoid harmful UV rays, research suggests.

A study of more than 1,500 medics in the US found just under 30 per cent do not believe they have the knowledge to keep the public sun safe.

As a result, less than half of those surveyed regularly advise their patients to wear sunscreen, sit in the shade and avoid tanning beds.

Scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warn most skin cancer cases come about due to UV rays from the sun or 'indoor tanning'.

Almost a THIRD of doctors and nurses claim they are not confident enough on sun safety to advise patients how to avoid skin cancer © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Almost a third of medics do not feel confident enough on sun safety to advise their patients on how to avoid harmful UV rays. This could be putting patients at risk of skin cancer (stock)

Nearly five million adults are treated for skin cancer every year in the US, the researchers wrote in the journal Preventative Medicine.

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As a doctor I often get asked by friends and family how to make the most of a medical visit. If you’ve had any recent tests at another medical facility that is not connected with your doctor , bring There’s almost always waiting involved at doctors ’ visits, so come prepared with your knitting, sudoku or your

Some patients may think it’s no big deal to be diagnosed with a nonmelanoma skin cancer . Create a regular schedule for skin checks, and talk to the doctor about what to look for on your own skin and when to Because of continued sun sensitivity, patients must avoid sunlight for a few days afterward.

And in the UK, there were 15,970 diagnoses of melanoma, the deadliest form of the disease, between 2014 and 2016, Cancer Research UK statistics show.

There has been a recent push in the US for doctors to promote skin cancer prevention and 'sun safe behaviours', the researchers wrote.

The latter includes using sunscreen, wearing protective clothing, sitting in the shade and staying indoors at midday, which is when UV rays are typically at their most intense.

In 2012, the US Prevention Services Task Force (USPSTF) released its first set of recommendations on 'clinical counseling on skin cancer prevention'.

The researchers, led by the behavioural scientist Dawn Holman, set out to uncover how many doctors in the US advise their patients on sun safety.

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Sun Exposure Can Protect You Against Cancer . Over the years, several studies have already No one is really certain why the FDA again refuses to listen to its scientists and doctors . Controlling your exposure to the sun is not always possible, and sometimes even the most vigilant of us forget to

They analysed data from the online 2016 survey DocStyles.

This includes information on 'skin cancer prevention counseling practices' for 1,506 GPs, internists, paediatricians and nurses.

Results revealed just under 30 per cent of those surveyed do not feel 'confident in their ability to provide advice about sun protection'.

As a result, less than half (48.5 per cent) of the medics regularly advise their patients on sun safety.

And only just more than a quarter (27.4 per cent) recommend people avoid 'indoor tanning'.

Of those who do give out advice, most only counsel patients with fair skin.

While people with pale complexions, light hair and freckles are more at risk of skin cancer, people with darker skin tones can also burn and develop the disease, the researchers warned.

The results further revealed most UV advice centres on wearing sunscreen, ditching sunbeds, avoiding the midday sun and wearing protective clothing.

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6 sun exposure myths that are damaging your skin Yes, you can burn in the shade - and more sunburn myths busted Melanoma skin cancer incidence rates have soared by 45 per cent since 2004, according to new figures released by Cancer Research UK. In people aged 25-to-49, melanoma skin cancer is the second most common cancer, but according to the charity almost 90 per cent of cases could be prevented if people took better care of their skin in the sun – both at home and on holiday. Getting sunburnt, just once every two years, can triple the risk of melanoma skin cancer.

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In the United States, more than a third of patients are referred to a specialist each year. Thank you for reading and if you have any thoughts on how to fix some of these pressing issues, or would like to contribute with our team on the next article, feel free to comment below or click here to submit an article.

However, the medics were less likely to advise patients to seek shade and check the UV index. This identifies the strength of the sun's radiation at a given place on a particular day.

The researchers stress providing a 'range of sun safety options' allows patients to 'find an approach that fits their preferences and activities'.

The study also found the medics were more likely to give advice if they had been practicing for more than 16 years, had treated sunburn in the past 12 months or were familiar with the USPSTF guidelines.

'Barriers to counseling' included a lack of time (58.1 per cent), more urgent concerns (49.1 per cent) and patient disinterest (46.3 per cent).

To overcome the time issue, future studies should look for ways of 'engaging other members of the medical team', such as 'health educators', in 'counseling efforts', the researchers added.

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