Health & Fitness: An Online Community Are ‘Pimping’ Their Mobility Aids To Change The Conversation Around Disability - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Health & Fitness An Online Community Are ‘Pimping’ Their Mobility Aids To Change The Conversation Around Disability

18:00  22 november  2019
18:00  22 november  2019 Source:   closeronline.co.uk

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becomes disabled . has a change in their impairment or health condition that could mean they face Disability Confident is creating a movement of change , encouraging employers to think differently Many people with physical impairments have mobility aids to assist them. You may only need to take

Hannah Hoskins © Credits: Instagram/not_your_grandmas_gb Hannah Hoskins

When recent photographs emerged of Lena Dunham using a cane, she swiftly addressed them on Instagram. ‘I could choose to be embarrassed by these paparazzi pics […] but I’m really not,’ the Girls writer and director wrote. ‘This is what life is like when I’m struggling most with chronic illness. An Ehler-Danlos syndrome flare means that I need support from more than just my friends... so thank you, sweet cane!’

‘For years, I resisted doing anything that would make my physical situation easier, insisting that a cane would “make things weird.” But it’s so much less weird to actually be able to participate than to stay in bed all day.’

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Disability in mobility can either be a congenital or acquired with age problem. A People with Disabilities Program volunteer rides a motorized wheelchair around the lobby of the National Museum of the United States Air Force. Mobility is related to changes in a person's body as they age as well.

Synopsis: An overview of mobility aids for seniors and persons with disabilities including manual and electric wheelchairs and motorized scooters. Reduced mobility is something that many of us do not think twice about, but it is something that millions of people all over the world live with everyday.

Lena then went onto explain that the photograph encapsulates ‘the two-fold life of a woman with chronic illness,’ adding ‘we still rock our dreams and goals and passions (and fashions) and we live many lives in one day.’

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A post shared by Zooey Deschanel (@zooeydeschanel) on Feb 19, 2013 at 10:17pm PST

According to Hannah Hoskins – a 29-year-old woman who has fibromyalgia and uses mobility aids - posts like Lena’s are significant. ‘It’s so important,’ Hannah tells me over the phone, adding that people like Hollywood actress Selma Blair – who publicly documents her experience of multiple sclerosis - are also contributing to the conversation. ‘The more people see it, the more it’s normalised,’ Hannah says.

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For people with disabilities , barriers can be more frequent and have greater impact. Learn about what these barriers are for the disabled . “Factors in a person’s environment that, through their absence or presence, limit functioning and create disability .

Mobility aids are designed to help people with their independence and reduce pain. Mobility aids are devices designed to help people who have problems moving around enjoy greater freedom and Typically people who have disabilities or injuries, or older adults who are at increased risk of falling

Four years ago, Hannah was diagnosed with fibromyalgia - a misunderstood, chronic condition that causes widespread pain around the body, problems with mental processing (known as ‘fibro fog’), extreme fatigue, muscle stiffness and headaches. Hannah has used a plethora of aids since her diagnosis and has noticed how ‘differently’ people react when confronted them. ‘People treat you differently when you use a walking stick,’ she explains. ‘They ask stuff like "what's wrong with you?" and you're like, You're a stranger - I'm not gonna give you my medical records.’ This experience, according to Hannah, is commonplace within the disabled community. ‘It happens all the time,’ she explains, adding that a friend was once ‘chased down the street’ after refusing to answer a stranger's questions.

  An Online Community Are ‘Pimping’ Their Mobility Aids To Change The Conversation Around Disability © Instagram/not_your_grandmas_gb

Hannah believes that people question mobility aids because of ‘the underrepresentation’ of the disabled community. ‘It’s just not spoken about enough,’ she adds. ‘We don’t know how to deal with disabled people.’ Determined to change the conversation, Hannah customised her clinical-looking ‘grandma’ walker and spray-painted it bubble-gum pink. She then worked with a designer Charlotte Peacock (@twin_made) - who made her a leopard print bag and seat cover - and named the walker ‘Sheila’ (after the 2006 Sheila’s Wheels advert – think three women in pink dresses singing about cheaper car insurance).

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Let the community answer your question. A lot of people who need mobility aids are afraid to get them. I was , at first. And, even though I’ve had both my rollator and my chair for over a year, I still get nervous and anxious Yes, I love my mobility aids and think anyone who needs one should get one.

Mobility impairment refers to the inability of a person to use one or more of his/her extremities, or a lack of strength to walk, grasp, or lift objects. Mobility impairment may be caused by a number of factors, such as disease, an accident, or a congenital disorder and may be the result from neuro-muscular and

a woman wearing a red dress: Hannah Hoskins with 'Sheila' © Credits: Hannah Hoskins with 'Sheila' Hannah Hoskins with 'Sheila' a person sitting in a chair: The Sheila © Credits: The Sheila The Sheila

‘Everyone started treating me differently,’ Hannah says. ‘They would talk to me like a normal person because they could see my personality in the walker and the way that it looked. They are suddenly reminded that I am a human being and not a mobility aid.'

Encouraged by her experience, she started a Facebook group called Pimp My Mobility Aid – which later branched out into an Instagram (notyourgrandmas_gb) - to teach others how to customise their aids. ‘People are now swapping tips and dyeing their own compression gloves,’ she explains. ‘One lady has stitched herself a wheelchair cover, another has added pink ribbon to hers with glow in the dark stickers.’

A walker customised with tape by a member of Pimp My Mobility Aid. Courtesy of @BowlingAlleyCats via @not_your_grandmas_gb © Credits: Courtesy of @BowlingAlleyCats via @not_your_grandmas_gb A walker customised with tape by a member of Pimp My Mobility Aid. Courtesy of @BowlingAlleyCats via @not_your_grandmas_gb

Although, it’s more than just ‘adding a bit of colour’ Hannah explains, insisting personalisation is about ‘taking ownership’ of your aid. ‘It's really, really difficult getting your first mobility aid because you're admitting that there's something that you've lost,’ she adds. ‘There's a grieving process - a lot of people talk about it as being the death of person that you thought you would be.’

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A disability is any condition that makes it more difficult for a person to do certain activities or interact with the world around them. These conditions, or impairments, may be cognitive, developmental

If your illness or disability is typically “invisible,” people may question why you’re using a mobility aid at all, while others may think their one-liners are funny. We asked our Mighty community to share the most ridiculous things they’ve heard people say about their mobility aids . For those readers who

‘It’s a very, very difficult journey,’ Hannah says, while adding that ‘other people’ often make it harder. Family members sometimes question a person’s decision to use a mobility aid. ‘A family member might say ‘Oh you’re not that bad, you don't need to use a mobility aid, or it just doesn’t look right,' Hannah explains. 'A lot of doctors don’t suggest [them] either.’

Hannah believes that mobility aids are often seen as a personal failing, as opposed to tools of freedom. ‘Mobility aids offer you a really good lifeline of being able to continue as much of your life as possible,’ she adds, insisting that’s why her aids are brightly coloured and outrageous. ‘It’s about a celebration about freedom,’ she adds.

Hannah is on the cusp of launching her own business – with the help of a crowdfunding page - called ‘Not Your Grandma’s', which will offer printed walking sticks. The designs will feature phrases like ‘nope’, ‘not today’ and ‘can’t touch this.’ Hannah hopes that they will start a conversation: ‘Someone might ask why it says, "don’t touch this", and you can explain that touching someone’s mobility aid is like touching them.’ According to Hannah, this is a common occurrence. ‘People at work used to play with my stick and move it. What people don’t understand that is if you move it, that’s an issue for me.’ Hannah’s mobility aids, she says, will offer people the ‘language’ to take ownership, while educating people who don’t understand.

Mobility aids offer you a really good lifeline of being able to continue as much of your life as possible.

Not only is Hannah changing the rhetoric around mobility aids, she’s also launching a podcast – ‘Am I Disabled Now?’ – which will offer listeners advice on how to navigate disability. ‘80 per cent of people who are disabled become disabled,’ she says. ‘So you have a whole group of people learning to be disabled; you’re not given a booklet. Everyone wants to handed a blue badge and a booklet that says this is how it is. And that’s what I’m trying to offer people, that it’s OK to still be learning.’

‘A lot of people are hurting [so] the colourful mobility aids and the community we are trying to create means that they don’t feel so alone,’ she continues ‘There’s someone else there to guide you through. And maybe we can’t hand you a blue badge, but we can talk to you about how you deal with that.’

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The strength and conditioning workout to enhance your mobility .
Stronger in winter = quicker in spring.‘I think there has been a disconnect between accessible mobility and strength training and running performance,’ says Harvey. ‘So I made sure that Running Foundations requires minimal equipment and that each of the workouts takes no more than 30 minutes to complete. Everything is running focused. There are lots of single-limb exercises with a focus on stability and strength. It’s designed to get runners moving correctly and becoming less susceptible to injury.

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