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Health & Fitness Too much sitting in adolescence linked to higher risk of depression

07:50  13 february  2020
07:50  13 february  2020 Source:   covermg.com

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Adolescents who sit for much of the day have a greater risk of depression by the time they reach adulthood, a UK study has found. Growing numbers of young people with depression and increased time spent sedentary could be two linked trends, researchers at University College London (UCL)

Adolescents who sit for much of the day have a greater risk of depression by the time they reach adulthood, a UK study has found. Growing numbers of young people with depression and increased time spent sedentary could be two linked trends, researchers at University College London (UCL)

a woman sitting on a wooden surface © Provided by Cover Media Teenagers who spend eight hours a day sitting down have an increased risk of developing depression when they reach adulthood.

Researchers at the University College London (UCL) found that adolescents who spend large amounts of the day sitting were more likely to have depressive symptoms, such as low mood and poor concentration.

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However, they discovered that just 60 minutes of light activity daily at the age of 12 was linked to a 10 per cent reduction in depression at 18. 

Aaron Kandola, lead author of the study, said that young people should be encouraged to get up and move more.

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Wednesday, 12 February 2020 Too much sitting in adolescence linked to higher risk of depression – study | Guadalupe Richards Researchers found that those

Adolescents who sit for much of the day have a greater risk of depression by the time they reach adulthood, a UK study has found. Our findings show that young people who are inactive for large proportions of the day throughout adolescence face a greater risk of depression by age 18.

  Too much sitting in adolescence linked to higher risk of depression © Getty "We found that it's not just more intense forms of activity that are good for our mental health, but any degree of physical activity that can reduce the time we spend sitting down is likely to be beneficial," he explained. 

The research team analysed more than 4,000 adolescents aged 12, 14 and 16, who wore accelerometer devices to track their movement for at least 10 hours over three days.

Sad and lonely teenager portrait in the city street © Getty Sad and lonely teenager portrait in the city street Between the ages of 12 and 16, physical activity dramatically declined, and there was an increase of almost two hours daily in sedentary behaviour. 

The researchers found that every additional 60 minutes of sedentary behaviour per day at age 12, 14 and 16 were linked to an average 10 per cent increase in depression, while those who spent consistently high amounts of time sitting down every day had a 28.2 per cent increase in depressive symptoms by the age of 18.

Sadness teenage girl sitting alone on the floor © Getty Sadness teenage girl sitting alone on the floor Senior study author Dr. Joseph Hayes wants schools to introduce initiatives to promote exercise in young people.

"Small changes to our environments could make it easier for all of us to be a little bit less sedentary," he added.

Too much sitting in adolescence linked to higher risk of depression – study .
Researchers found that those who did an additional hour of light activity each day saw a reduction in depressive symptoms when they reached 18. They analysed data on 4,257 adolescents, who were taking part in the University of Bristol’s Children of the 90s cohort study.The participants wore accelerometers to track their movement for at least 10 hours over at least three days, at ages 12, 14 and 16, except when washing or during water sports.These devices showed whether the child was sedentary, engaging in light activity such as playing an instrument, or moderate to physical activity such as running.

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