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Health & Fitness Coronavirus self-isolation: how to self-quarantine, and the latest advice on who needs to in the UK

19:01  02 march  2020
19:01  02 march  2020 Source:   inews.co.uk

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Coronavirus information posters at Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, Tayside. (Photo by Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images) © PA Wire/PA Images Coronavirus information posters at Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, Tayside. (Photo by Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images) "If there's a chance you could have coronavirus, call 111 and isolate yourself from other people," say the NHS.

But what does that mean?

Quarantine and isolation is a way of restricting the movement of people who may have been exposed to an infectious disease in an effort to prevent the spread.

Those placed under quarantine or isolation may not have a confirmed medical diagnosis, but could pose a risk of spreading a virus due to exposure.

Here's everything you need to know about it:

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  Coronavirus self-isolation: how to self-quarantine, and the latest advice on who needs to in the UK © Provided by The i

Who needs to self-isolate?

Anybody who feels there is a chance that they could have contracted coronavirus needs to self-isolate, before calling 111 for advice.

But there are certain groups of people who are more at risk than others. You should self-isolate if you have travelled to any of the following places:

to Hubei province in China in the last 14 days to Iran, areas of northern Italy in lockdown or "special care zone" areas in South Korea since 19 February to other parts of mainland China or South Korea, Thailand, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia or Macau in the last 14 days and have a cough, high temperature or shortness of breath to other parts of northern Italy (anywhere north of Pisa, Florence and Rimini), Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos or Myanmar since 19 February and have a cough, high temperature or shortness of breath

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How do I self-isolate?

Travellers returning from areas hit heavily by the coronavirus will need to self-isolate (Photo: Danny Lawson/PA Wire)

The best place to self-isolate yourself is obviously your own home, where you should stay for the duration of your quarantine.

a group of people standing in front of a building © Provided by The i This means you shouldn't go to work, school or public areas, and not use any public transport or taxis.

If you need something from outside your home, you can ask friends, family members or delivery services to carry out errands for you.

But you're advised to try to avoid visitors to your home, though it is OK for friends and family or delivery drivers to drop off food and other supplies.

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What if I'm not at home?

Of course, it's possible that any coronavirus symptoms could arise while you're out and about.

If this is the case, the official advice insists that you do not go to a GP surgery or hospital, as that could spread the virus inordinately.

Instead, you should try to find a room to isolate yourself away from others. Ask for help if you need to, but try to stay at least two metres away from other people.

a person standing on a bed © Provided by The i Open a window for ventilation if you can, but otherwise touch objects and surfaces as little as possible, and call 111 for advice.

If you find yourself on public transport and become unwell, you should go back to your home or place of residence immediately.

How long should I self-isolate for?

(Photo: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images)

You may need to do this for up to 14 days to help reduce the possible spread of infection.

A women wearing a face mask at Leicester Square tube station, London, as the first case of coronavirus has been confirmed in Wales and two more were identified in England - bringing the total number in the UK to 19. (Photo by Kirsty O'Connor/PA Images via Getty Images) © PA Wire/PA Images A women wearing a face mask at Leicester Square tube station, London, as the first case of coronavirus has been confirmed in Wales and two more were identified in England - bringing the total number in the UK to 19. (Photo by Kirsty O'Connor/PA Images via Getty Images)

What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explaining they usually cause “mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses”, like the common cold.

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This particular strain originated in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, the largest city in central China, and is in the same family as SARS and MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome).

The symptoms of coronavirus are:

a cough a high temperature shortness of breath

But these symptoms do not necessarily mean you have the illness.

The symptoms are similar to other illnesses that are much more common, such as cold and flu.

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