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Health & Fitness After weeks of COVID-19 cases, Russian doctor craves quiet

10:51  23 may  2020
10:51  23 may  2020 Source:   msn.com

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MOSCOW (AP) — As he strides down the sidewalk outside Moscow's Filatov Hospital in blue jeans and garish crimson shoes, Dr . Osman Osmanov shows no signs of

Virus Outbreak Russia Doctor 's Ordeal. In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr . Osman Osmanov, center, puts on protective gear before his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia . Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia 's coronavirus

In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov has a rest after his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov has a rest after his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

MOSCOW (AP) — As he strides down the sidewalk outside Moscow's Filatov Hospital in blue jeans and garish crimson shoes, Dr. Osman Osmanov shows no signs of the rigors he's just been through.

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Now, after weeks of seemingly endless work, he is struggling to remain stoic. “I am not at the end of my rope," he said, “but I feel tired.” Stay informed daily on the latest news and advice on COVID - 19 from the editors at U.S. News & World Report.

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In this photo taken on Saturday, May 16, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov walks through a disinfectant sluice after his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Saturday, May 16, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov walks through a disinfectant sluice after his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

But behind the veneer of calm is a yearning for relief from countless days of laboring to save the lives of the stream of coronavirus victims who come into the hospital on gurneys, frightened and struggling to breathe.

In this photo taken on Saturday, May 16, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov waits as a medical worker paints his protective gear during a rest on his shift at the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Saturday, May 16, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov waits as a medical worker paints his protective gear during a rest on his shift at the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

“Frankly speaking, I just want to be in silence for a couple of days. I would like to go somewhere in the mountains where there is no cell phone signal, so I can sit quietly and have some air," the 40-year-old intensive care physician told The Associated Press at the end of yet another long shift at the epicenter of Russia's coronavirus outbreak.

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Four doctors who received Russia ’s Sputnik V Covid - 19 vaccine have subsequently tested positive for the virus, sparking doubts about its effectiveness. According to the chief infectious disease specialist in the region, they caught Covid - 19 after being vaccinated, but before protection had fully formed.

" Russia 's top doctor is an ABSOLUTELY TERRIBLE business man after not wanting to trade the COVID - 19 vaccine for entry into America. In addition, I represent Russia in the UNESCO International Bioethics Committee. I remain an expert in this area, but for effective work I have to

In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov starts his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov starts his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

He smiles hesitantly when he expresses the wish, as if confessing a secret.

In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, and Dr. Vitaly Mushkin, right, prepare a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration for computer tomography screening at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, and Dr. Vitaly Mushkin, right, prepare a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration for computer tomography screening at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's 326,000 coronavirus cases and 3,249 deaths, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours at a time.

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The data is based on 20 cases of Covid - 19 from 16,000 volunteers given the Sputnik V vaccine or a dummy injection. So far there are no safety issues, with Russian researchers saying there were "no unexpected adverse events" 21 days after volunteers received their first of two injections.

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In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, right, and Dr. Konstantin Glebov, center left, and Dr. Vitaly Mushkin perform tracheal intubation of a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, right, and Dr. Konstantin Glebov, center left, and Dr. Vitaly Mushkin perform tracheal intubation of a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

The demands are intense; the rewards are gratifying.

In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, and Dr. Konstantin Glebov, center left, perform tracheal intubation of a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, and Dr. Konstantin Glebov, center left, perform tracheal intubation of a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

“When a patient starts suffocating, you should calm him down. People are just scared," he said. “If you come and give him some oxygen, put him in a prone position, the situation changes right in front of your eyes."

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In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, and Dr. Konstantin Glebov, center left, perform tracheal intubation on a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, and Dr. Konstantin Glebov, center left, perform tracheal intubation on a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

“Sometimes all you need is to calm down a patient, and then he feels much better,” Osmanov said.

In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, drinks a coffee as he has breakfast before his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, drinks a coffee as he has breakfast before his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

In the early days of the outbreak, he said, he watched the crisis unfold with some scientific detachment.

In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, has breakfast before his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, has breakfast before his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

“At first, it was interesting, of course. Everyone took it as something new," he said. “I had an impression at first, that we were fighting an invisible enemy.”

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In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, puts on protective gear before his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, puts on protective gear before his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

Now, after weeks of seemingly endless work, he is struggling to remain stoic.

In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov puts on protective gear before his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov puts on protective gear before his shift at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

“I am not at the end of my rope," he said, “but I feel tired.”

In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, left, and his colleagues treat a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, left, and his colleagues treat a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

There is no end in sight for Osmanov's punishing workload. Although new case counts have begun falling, to 8,849 on Friday, down from more than 10,000 a day last week, Russia on Friday recorded its highest one-day death toll of 150.

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In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, and his colleagues treat a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin) © Provided by Associated Press In this photo taken on Friday, May 15, 2020, Dr. Osman Osmanov, center, and his colleagues treat a coronavirus patient on artificial lung respiration at an intensive care unit of the Filatov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Moscow accounts for about half of all of Russia's coronavirus cases, a deluge that strains the city's hospitals and has forced Osmanov to to work every day for the past two months, sometimes for 24 hours in a row. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

“The current situation doesn’t allow" for rest, he said. “So we’re just hoping that soon it will all end, we will win and it will all be fine.”

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