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Health & Fitness 'I became a mum after spending more than £60,000 on 17 rounds of IVF'

11:10  03 july  2020
11:10  03 july  2020 Source:   walesonline.co.uk

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  I’m Devastated My IVF Was Cancelled, But Working On The Front Line Is Giving Me Hope I’m Devastated My IVF Was Cancelled, But Working On The Front Line Is Giving Me HopeOn 18th March the British Fertility Society and the Association of Reproductive and Clinical Scientists released a joint statement for fertility staff, advising clinics to stop fertility treatments over the coming weeks in order to comply with social distancing measures and to alleviate the burden on the NHS.

But after spending £ 60 , 000 and enduring nine rounds of IVF Mrs Neal said: ‘ After reading how donor egg babies take in much of the pregnant mum ’s DNA Six months after the first round of IVF failed, Marie became pregnant on a second IVF attempt, but devastatingly, at six weeks she miscarried.

'If you want something enough, you'll get it': Businesswoman, 47, spends £ 20k to become a mother Underwent two rounds of IVF treatment in the UK before flying to South Africa Lisa and fiancé Michael welcomed Izobel 17 months ago and want another baby £ 20, 000 on IVF to become a first-time mum , after she claims she was told she'd 'left it too late'.

A new mum has revealed the hardship, heartache and unbridled joy of her IVF journey after giving birth to a healthy baby boy on her 17th attempt.

Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger, 43, welcomed little Kobe Mac Grainger into the world on Thursday, June 4 at the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, weighing 8lb 14oz.

But it will be many years before her precious son will understand the lengths his parents went to before they could have him.

In total, including travel costs, Kirsten believes the family spent more than £60,000 on private fertility treatment both in Wales and in Greece.

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A CAREER woman of 47, who never got round to having a baby, has forked out £ 20, 000 on IVF to become a first-time mum at 47 – after she began to go But the determined couple refused to give up and finally found out they were expecting after jetting off to South Africa for two more rounds of IVF .

She claims it was only when she met Steve Davies, a doctor originally from Tredegar who now runs an IVF clinic in Athens, that she knew she was going to become a mother.

a woman holding a baby: Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger, 43, from Beddau, gave birth to her son Kobe after 17 rounds of IVF © Rob Browne Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger, 43, from Beddau, gave birth to her son Kobe after 17 rounds of IVF

Kirsten, a senior business manager at British Gas, said: "Being a mum is amazing. It's everything I wanted it to be and more.

"I want to give hope to other women going through the same things I did. I also want them to know that seeking treatment outside the UK is not as scary as it seems.

"Without seeing Steve in Greece, I know I would not be a mum today."

Kirsten pursued a career in her 20s and 30s before tying the knot to rugby player Simon Grainger, a former Cardiff, Doncaster and Bedwas back row forward, at 36.

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  Coronavirus latest: IVF clinics to re-open as UK moves towards easing lockdown Clinics will have to show they are meeting conditions to provide safe and effective treatment during the outbreak before they are given the green light to restart treatment.Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, said: at Friday's Downing Street briefing: "Now that we are past the peak, I am delighted to announce the restoration of fertility services."People who are relying on fertility treatment have been worried during these unprecedented times not knowing when they could continue their journey to start a family.

They spent £ 40, 000 on four private rounds of IVF . 'We had our first round of IVF on the NHS in 2013 using ICSI — where sperm is injected directly into the egg. My parents gave us £ 8, 000 to pay for it, knowing how desperately I wanted to be a mum .

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"I'd always planned to start a family a year after getting married and then carry on with my career. How wrong was I?" she said.

"I think I was a bit naive and thought that fertility issues just happened to other people."

a close up of a man and a woman smiling for the camera: Kirsten with her husband Simon Grainger © Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger Kirsten with her husband Simon Grainger

At the age of 38, following several tests, she was diagnosed with unexplained fertility problems and was running out of time to have free IVF treatment on the Welsh NHS.

"The NHS is great when it comes to medical emergencies, but for fertility treatment you are more or less written off by the time you reach 40," said Kirsten, from Beddau, near Llantrisant.

"I knew I was running out of time and the waiting lists were so long [on the NHS]."

Kirsten opted to use a private IVF clinic for the first time at the age of 39 and admitted to getting the "trigger shot" - a hormonal injection so that eggs are matured for collection - incorrect on her first try.

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  Fertility Diary: Coronavirus Put IVF On Hold Welcome to Refinery29’s Fertility Diaries, where people chronicle their joyous, painful, and sometimes complicated paths to parenthood. History: I’ve had two miscarriages, and was just starting my fourth IVF cycle before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, interrupting our plans. Age: 43 Location: San Jose, CA Occupation: Research Director Household income: $250,000 (£202,574) April 2018 We officially start trying My husband and I just got married — I’mHistory: I’ve had two miscarriages, and was just starting my fourth IVF cycle before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, interrupting our plans.

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More than half have to pay for some or all of their medical care, with one in ten spending more than £ 30, 000 and a desperate few up to £ 100, 000 . Woman left heartbroken by four failed rounds of IVF had a hysterectomy to take away 'false hope'. EGGSCELLENT ADVICE.

"I was absolutely beside myself," she said.

Doctors said that one of the biggest fertility issues Kirsten faced was the fact she was unable to produce lots of eggs, which resulted in a lack of embryos.

"Some women might have, for example, 18 eggs and eight embryos after one round and be able to freeze some of them. But I never had that luxury," she said.

However, on her ninth round of IVF Kirsten did manage to fall pregnant.

She added: "It was amazing. I wanted to tell everyone. At that point I was very open and honest with people about what I was going through."

But six weeks later she was found to have suffered an early miscarriage, also known as a bio-chemical miscarriage.

"That was a turning point for me. At the private clinic in Wales it was all a 'numbers game' and I knew there was another way."

Through a mutual friend, Kirsten was told about an assisted conception unit in Athens, Greece called Embryogenesis - and she decided to call them in September 2018.

a man and a woman posing for a picture: Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger, 43, gave birth to her son Kobe after 17 rounds of IVF. She's pictured with her husband Simon Grainger © Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger, 43, gave birth to her son Kobe after 17 rounds of IVF. She's pictured with her husband Simon Grainger

"From the moment Steve said 'hello' I knew I would become a mother," said Kirsten, who said she had an instant connection with the doctor.

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A couple who spent thousands of pounds on controversial ‘add-on’ fertility treatments that experts say are useless and possibly harmful are set to become the first in Britain to Legal secretary Tracy Wint underwent two years of unsuccessful IVF treatment, spending more than £ 20, 000 in her desperation

"My mum and dad were on a cruise in October 2018 and they drove to the hospital to meet Steve and see the facilities.

"He took my mother and said he was going to give her all the fertility drugs I'd need to take back home. She then went next door to the pharmacy to pay for them. They are a lot cheaper and easier to access in Greece than in the UK."

After a couple of failed attempts, in which frozen eggs were taken from Kirsten and implanted back into her at a later date, the clinicians decided to go with a more "natural" method.

"It meant the egg collection was aligned with my normal menstrual cycle. There were no stimulation drugs or injections involved," she said.

a man and a woman taking a selfie: In Greece in July 2019 on round 16 of her treatment © Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger In Greece in July 2019 on round 16 of her treatment

A biopsy was taken from a layer of Kirsten's uterus which revealed that there was inflammation and a bacterial infection which could have been affecting implantation.

After being given antibiotics and having another try at the treatment, she fell pregnant.

"My pregnancy was brilliant. I didn't have any sickness or tiredness. I flew through it," she said.

"I think it was God's way of repaying us after the long and arduous journey we'd been through."

a person lying on a bed: Kirsten holding her son Kobe following a c-section at the University Hospital of Wales © Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger Kirsten holding her son Kobe following a c-section at the University Hospital of Wales Ian Moran holding a baby: Simon, a former rugby player with Cardiff, Doncaster and Bedwas, was there throughout the IVF journey © Kirsten Tuchli-Grainger Simon, a former rugby player with Cardiff, Doncaster and Bedwas, was there throughout the IVF journey

Kirsten said it "never, ever" crossed her mind to give up on becoming a mum.

In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF): Cost, process, success rate, diet and exercise tips

  In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF): Cost, process, success rate, diet and exercise tips Considering IVF? A doctor explains the process, plus diet and exercise tips to boost your chances of success. IVF is one of several techniques that exist to help people conceive when they have problems with fertility. Having a baby is not always easy and you can feel desperate if you don’t conceive quite as you predicted. There are many special treatments that can help you go on to have a natural healthy pregnancy. If you are having trouble getting pregnant, your first stop should be a chat with your GP to see if you are giving yourself the best chance.

"I read that a woman in Australia went through a world record 22 rounds of IVF, so I wasn't far off that," she joked.

"I now have a beautiful baby boy who has massive feet and hands just like his dad. He's a rugby player, for sure."

a person holding a baby: Kobe, who is now one month old, was described as a 'very content baby' © Rob Browne Kobe, who is now one month old, was described as a 'very content baby'

Kirsten, who is on maternity leave and enjoying life with her one-month-old son, is now planning on having a second child through IVF in Athens.

"My work were incredibly flexible with me. I went to Athens 11 times in one year and they allowed me to do my job remotely from there," she said.

"I was also very fortunate to have a great support network around me and my family were able to help with some of the costs.

"I know it was a lot of money, but if it had cost £100,000 we would have found the money from somewhere. We were desperate to have children."

a woman holding a baby: Kirsten now wants to encourage other women to seek treatment outside of the UK © Rob Browne Kirsten now wants to encourage other women to seek treatment outside of the UK

Kirsten, who is now planning on creating her own video blogs on her IVF experiences, added: "I firmly believe there is a good egg in every woman; you've just got to find it.

"With the right partnership, the right clinic and a positive attitude, you can make all your dreams come true.

"I want more women to talk about their fertility problems. A problem shared is a problem halved, and there are still many women who are suffering in silence.

"The issue is becoming more vocalised but in some people's eyes it's still a taboo subject.

"I urge women who have problems to seek help quickly as time is of the essence."

Couples face IVF ‘postcode lottery’ – report .
‘Vast’ differences in provision have been found.The British Pregnancy Advisory Service (Bpas) surveyed local health bodies and found “vast” differences between national guidance and the care provided to women with fertility issues.

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