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Health & Fitness Leukaemia patient, 14, has weeks to find bone marrow donor

15:53  07 july  2020
15:53  07 july  2020 Source:   uk.style.yahoo.com

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The family of Lara Casalotti launches a campaign to find a bone marrow transplant donor for the yoga enthusiast who has leukemia .

A bone marrow donor is urgently needed for 5-month-old Arham. Battling two aggressive types of blood cancer - acute myeloid leukemia and For Arham to win his fight, his doctors are hoping to get to transplant after this round of chemo, and that means there are only a few weeks to find a matching

a close up of a woman: Amy Bartlett. A teenage girl fighting leukaemia for a second time has Amy Bartlett. A teenage girl fighting leukaemia for a second time has "weeks" to find a suitable bone marrow donor. See SWNS story SWMDcancer. Amy Bartlett, 14, from West Bridgford, Nottingham, was due to finish her two years of chemotherapy this June when she was told her cancer had returned. She was diagnosed in February 2018 after complaining about aches and pains in her joints, with doctors initially not knowing what the problem was. Blood tests confirmed that Amy had leukaemia, but stayed positive and was an “inspiration” throughout her chemotherapy treatment.

A teenager battling leukaemia is in a race against time to find a life-saving bone marrow donor.

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Bone marrow transplants may use cells from your own body (autologous transplant) or from a donor The transplanted stem cells find their way to your marrow , where — ideally — they begin In the days and weeks after your bone marrow transplant, you'll have blood tests and other tests to

Need help deciding if donating bone marrow is right for you? Get answers to frequently asked questions Ava, transplant recipient with her marrow donor , Michelle. A marrow transplant may be Learn how marrow donation works, the steps of a patient transplant, steps of donation , and

Amy Bartlett, 14, from Nottingham, was diagnosed with the disease aged 12, forcing her to endure two years of chemotherapy.

The student was due to finish her treatment on 4 July, only to be told her cancer had returned, with a bone marrow transplant offering the “highest chance of a cure”

A suitable match would “ideally” be found in the next two to three weeks.

Charities were forced to cancel bone marrow donor recruitment events after the coronavirus outbreak put a stop to large gatherings.

a little boy that is standing in the grass © Provided by Yahoo! Style UK

Chemotherapy ‘takes all your strength away’

Amy – once “playful, happy and energetic” – was diagnosed with leukaemia in February 2018 after she developed aches and pains in her joints.

“There's no logical explanation of why she’s got it, it's just one of those things,” said her father Leigh Bartlett, 48. “Some people get it.”

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As a registered bone marrow donor , you will be on standby to save a life. Join our fight against blood cancer online, it only takes 5 minutes. Register. Register to be a Potential Donor . We are an international nonprofit organization dedicated to the fight against blood cancer and blood disorders.

One factor weighed for bone marrow donation is age. Generally doctors request donors in the 18-44 age group. Be The Match® is a global leader in bone marrow transplantation. We conduct research to improve transplant outcomes provide support and resources for patients , and partner with a global

Amy reportedly told her mother Marie Bartlett, 51: “Mummy, it is okay; it’s better I get it than another smaller child.

“I am stronger and so have a better chance to beat it.”

Classed as high-risk, Amy underwent the most intensive course of chemotherapy that can be administered to a child with the disease, which lasted three months.

“She lost all of her hair, lost a lot of her strength and basically had to be in a wheelchair,” said Mr Bartlett. “She also had some reactions to some of the chemotherapy.”

Amy endured liver problems, steroid-induced diabetes and allergic reactions to the drugs she was taking.

“The first three to four months were really tough,” said Mr Bartlett.

“Slowly Amy’s strength started to come back, her hair started to grow.

“Day by day, you could see some recovery, but it’s never a full recovery because you’re constantly taking this chemotherapy. It really takes all your strength away from you.”

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Pancytopenic bone marrow failure. Susceptibility to cancer: Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Bone marrow /haematopoietic stem cell transplantation using related donors (where possible) is the only curative Molecular genetic testing is possible if the family-specific genetic variant has been identified.

Research has found that a small number of them are most important to transplant outcomes. The NMDP sets minimum matching levels that must be The patient 's blood will have the same blood type and dna of the donor . However, no, this will not change the person's personality, physical appearance

a person smiling for the camera: Amy Bartlett. A teenage girl fighting leukaemia for a second time has © Provided by Yahoo! Style UK Amy Bartlett. A teenage girl fighting leukaemia for a second time has "weeks" to find a suitable bone marrow donor. See SWNS story SWMDcancer. Amy Bartlett, 14, from West Bridgford, Nottingham, was due to finish her two years of chemotherapy this June when she was told her cancer had returned. She was diagnosed in February 2018 after complaining about aches and pains in her joints, with doctors initially not knowing what the problem was. Blood tests confirmed that Amy had leukaemia, but stayed positive and was an “inspiration” throughout her chemotherapy treatment.

‘Time is of the essence’

As June 2020 approached, the family started counting down the days until Amy’s treatment would supposedly end.

“They did a test on her three weeks ago and then the following day we got the phone call that changed it all really,” said Mr Bartlett.

“They said, unfortunately, they’ve detected leukaemia has returned in her body.”

That same afternoon, Amy was admitted to the Queen’s Medical Centre in Nottingham.

“They had to consider, what’s the right treatment path?” said Mr Bartlett.

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A bone marrow transplant replaces diseased bone marrow with healthy tissue, usually stem cells found in the blood. That’s why bone marrow transplants are also called stem The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) has a registry of potential donors that might be the match a patient needs.

After donation , bone marrow fully replaces itself in four to six weeks . According to the National Marrow Donor Program, the actual bone marrow donation procedure for transplants is not Used to treat leukemia and lymphoma, bone marrow donations save lives. If you’ve felt the urge to give to a

“Because [the] leukaemia came back, especially while she was still under chemotherapy, the first worry is the chemotherapy won’t work anymore.

“The unfortunate reality is she needs a different path to find the solution.

“That path is a going through a bone marrow stem cell transplant. In order to do that she needs a donor.”

Amy’s brother Marcus, 18, was tested but is not suitable. Siblings are a match around a third of the time.

“We need to find a match for Amy, ideally within the next two to three weeks, so time is of the essence,” said Mrs Bartlett

Feeling ‘in the hands of the medical experts”, the family is urging people to join a bone marrow register via DKMS, The Anthony Nolan Trust or the NHS British Bone Marrow Registry.

“Save somebody’s life,” said Mr Bartlett. “It might not be Amy’s, but it could be, you never know.

“That’s really the message I’m pushing. There’s a big misconception out there, which is you've got to go to the hospital, you’ve got to give blood and everything.

“The reality is it’s very straightforward. The big two, which is DKMS and the Anthony Nolan Trust, you can sign up online and they'll send you a pack through the post.

“You fill out the form, complete a swab, put it back in the prepaid envelope and return it and you’re on the register.”

Dr Mark Jesky, Amy’s consultant at Nottingham University Hospitals, added: “For children or adults whose leukaemia has sadly returned, undergoing a [bone marrow] stem cell transplant offers the highest chance of a cure.

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“Often these donors are volunteers as many patients do not have a suitable family match.

“Young men are particularly encouraged to register as they are the most frequent chosen donors.

“For the donor the process of donating is simple but for the patient this donation could give them a second chance at life.”

How could a bone marrow transplant cure leukaemia?

Bone marrow is soft, spongy tissue found at the centre of certain bones where blood stem cells reside.

Blood stem cells produce essential blood cells, like red blood cells that carry oxygen and white blood cells that fight infections.

Leukaemia stops bone marrow from functioning correctly. For many patients, the best hope of a cure is a bone marrow transplant, also known as a stem cell transplant.

In order for a bone marrow transplant to go ahead, the patient and the donor must have the same tissue type.

A patient’s immune system constantly checks for a protein, called human leukocyte antigen (HLA), found on the surface of many cells in the body.

The closer a HLA match the donor and patient are, the less likely the patient’s immune system will reject the new cells.


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